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Damp Boxes Vs Plastic Bags Tied Tightly


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#1 AndyL

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Posted 09 May 2010 - 10:17 AM

Any thoughts on what's more useful? Damp Boxes (plastic totes w/Lid & plaster bat poured in bottom) or tightly tied plastic bags?

#2 Lucy

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Posted 09 May 2010 - 11:01 AM

I use both. I keep a damp box for small pieces I am going to add to larger pieces. Some of these are kinda fragile so I don't even want the plastic bag touching them. I use plastic bags, mostly dry cleaner bags, on larger sculptural pieces that I'm working on. What I like about the bags is that I can leave the bag off a while, wrap it tightly or more loosely, cover just one part, spray the inside of the bag instead of the clay, and turn it inside out when it builds up condensation. So, the bags are better for me when I'm actively working on a piece and the damp box is good for when I make something and want to set it aside for a good while.

#3 Ingrid

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Posted 10 May 2010 - 11:01 AM

I made a 'damp box' that works for all multiple sized pieces.
If you have the space, wrap three sides of a Rubbermaid or other plastic shelving system
in heavy duty plastic drop cloths. Be sure to cover the bottom! Then take a sheet of plastic the length of the shelving system and secure to top. By leaving the edges free you can simply roll up the 'door' and lay on top of the new 'damp box'. To ensure a tight system, I clamp the bottom edges to the shelving system.

It is very easy to throw vessels on bats and simple place them on the shelves. I then roll down the 'door' and clamp the bottom.

#4 Denice

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Posted 12 May 2010 - 08:44 AM

Any thoughts on what's more useful? Damp Boxes (plastic totes w/Lid & plaster bat poured in bottom) or tightly tied plastic bags?

Andy The geographical area you live in and the location of your studio. My last studio was in a damp basement, I loosely covered large work and had a rubbermaid shelf wrapped in heavy plastic for smaller pieces, the basement was so damp I had to take my work upstairs to finish drying. My husband and I recently downsized and built a new house, I know have a dry studio with lots of light and windows, but I had to rethink my damp box situation. I still cover large pieces with wet sheets and plastic but I bought a cabinet for smaller work. I found it at Home Depot, it's about 2'wide 6'tall and 18" deep has vents in the back and adjustable shelves. I only paid 30.00 for it I figured if it didn't work I could find another home for it. It works great, I can dry pieces as slow as my old damp basement and holds a lot of work.
Denice (Wichita, KS)

#5 anna

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Posted 16 May 2010 - 10:22 AM

For peoples with space in there studio.
An old fridge or freezer that is out of order can be used, both for keeping claybreads, as for already (partialy) made works.
All the moist stays inside.
No rapping, boxes or plastic needed.

anna

#6 Mudlark

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Posted 16 May 2010 - 10:13 PM

For peoples with space in there studio.
An old fridge or freezer that is out of order can be used, both for keeping claybreads, as for already (partialy) made works.
All the moist stays inside.
No rapping, boxes or plastic needed.

anna


I've used an old fridge for ages. They need a periodic wash with a household chlorine solution to prevent mould growing as some moulds are dangerous to health.

mudlark




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