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Bailey Quick Trim Bat


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#1 claydame

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 01:22 PM

I'm fairly new to pottery and find trimming a real hassle. Has anyone tried the Bailey Quick Trim Bat? What's your opinion of it?




#2 scoobydoozie

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 01:42 PM

Hi, ClayDame. You should probably repost this in the "In the Studio Forum" instead of the Potters Council forum. You'll probably get some answers here, but would get more in the correct forum. I'm looking forward to seeing what everyone has to say as I've seen the product also and am curious if anyone has tried it.

#3 claydame

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 03:22 PM

Hi, ClayDame. You should probably repost this in the "In the Studio Forum" instead of the Potters Council forum. You'll probably get some answers here, but would get more in the correct forum. I'm looking forward to seeing what everyone has to say as I've seen the product also and am curious if anyone has tried it.



Thanks scoobydoozie. I'll do that. Obviously, I'm new to this forum to! haha!

#4 GA_Clayman67

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 04:02 PM

I'm fairly new to pottery and find trimming a real hassle. Has anyone tried the Bailey Quick Trim Bat? What's your opinion of it?




I'm back into pottery after a 25 year layoff and one of the FIRST things I did was scout around for anything that would shorten and/or simplify the trimming process.
I ordered the Bailey Quick Trim bat and cannot recommend it highly enough! The challenge is still getting the pot centered for trimming, but once you've done it, the quick release magnets
hold the piece beautifully (they're cushioned so you don't damage the piece) and you'll whip through the process in no time!

I'm now planning to get the larger bat for platters and large bowls. Let there be no hesitation in your mind -- this is one FINE product!!

Art Carlson
Whistle Tree Pottery

#5 Idaho Potter

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 09:19 PM

There are tons of us that use the Giffin Grip which automatically centers your pots. It even has an arrangement whereby you can center and hold altered pots that are no longer round. Is the Bailey Quick Trim that much cheaper and is the price difference worth having trouble centering your pots?

#6 SShirley

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Posted 17 November 2011 - 08:23 AM

There are tons of us that use the Giffin Grip which automatically centers your pots. It even has an arrangement whereby you can center and hold altered pots that are no longer round. Is the Bailey Quick Trim that much cheaper and is the price difference worth having trouble centering your pots?




Idaho Potter,

I've had a Giffin Grip for about 15 years and I've never known about an arrangement to hold altered pots. What do you mean? Also, I have had issues with it easing up on it's "grip" and letting the pot move during trimming. Probably operator error, but I've never been able to figure out the problem. And the little arms usually make jab marks in the sides of my pots. Still, even with it's problems, I still use it a lot. (I hate wasting the wads of clay to trim without it.) I was personally intrigued by this Quick Trim Bat and will check it out next time I'm in a clay store. Getting the pot into the center doesn't seem that daunting, but I would really like to keep it there.

Sylvia

#7 Idaho Potter

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 08:06 PM

The arrangement for altered uses slides that you can adjust individually and tighten down with butterfly nuts. After you approximate the "center" of the altered pot you move the slides in until the "arms" grab onto the pot in three places and hold it there. The slides do not engage the rings on the lower part of the Giffin Grip. Extra work, but I like to be able to put a clean foot on even a pot where the only round left is the bottom. I don't know if they still sell the adjustable sets, but check out their online store.

As to the easing of the arms. Yep, had that happen, too. Near as I can figure, it happens when I get a lead foot and the wheel is going too fast. I just check the arms once in awhile to see if they've loosened. If you are getting more than a scuff mark from the arm holders, you probably just need to let your pots dry a little more.

#8 clay lover

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Posted 27 November 2011 - 03:10 PM

The arrangement for altered uses slides that you can adjust individually and tighten down with butterfly nuts. After you approximate the "center" of the altered pot you move the slides in until the "arms" grab onto the pot in three places and hold it there. The slides do not engage the rings on the lower part of the Giffin Grip. Extra work, but I like to be able to put a clean foot on even a pot where the only round left is the bottom. I don't know if they still sell the adjustable sets, but check out their online store.

As to the easing of the arms. Yep, had that happen, too. Near as I can figure, it happens when I get a lead foot and the wheel is going too fast. I just check the arms once in awhile to see if they've loosened. If you are getting more than a scuff mark from the arm holders, you probably just need to let your pots dry a little more.


If the arms are loose, take the grip off the wheel head and look at the tiny metal washer sort of ring under the rubber o ring that holds the 2 side of the grip together. You got more than 1 of those when you bought the grip, add one to the set up. It will tighten the 2 side together and stop the loosening!Posted Image

#9 JBaymore

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Posted 27 November 2011 - 03:43 PM

I'm fairly new to pottery and find trimming a real hassle. Has anyone tried the Bailey Quick Trim Bat? What's your opinion of it?


Personally, it looks to me like a solution in need of a real problem. There are so many easy and cheap solutions to this task.

best,

................john

PS: Rather than re-hash..... I'll post this link to my thoughts (from LONG ago) on "The Grip" too: http://www.potters.o...bject22656.htm/
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#10 OffCenter

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Posted 28 November 2011 - 10:14 AM

I have a Griffin Grip but prefer to trim on the wheel head with lumps of clay or open and non-symmetrical forms on the hump, but I've got to say the Bailey Quick Trim has this beautiful simplicity about it (sort of like it's the Mac and the Griffin Grip is the PC) that makes me want it even though I'll probably still end up preferring lumps and humps.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#11 Mariede

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Posted 28 November 2011 - 01:48 PM

Hi, I'm new to this site but have been receiving the e-mails for a couple of years. I also have the Bailey Quick Trim and really do love it. Its wonderful to be able to trim something with an uneven or altered edges, and after drawing the centering lines on the bat itself, I find centering (even the altered items) to be quite simple. However, I did find that a few of the more straight sided items were marred by the edges of the magnets. Perhaps it's operator error-pushing the magnets too tightly to the leather hard item. To correct this problem, I've put 1/4" to 1/2" thick foam pieces in between the magnet and the item being trimmed and that does help. Again, I LOVE THIS ITEM and would highly recommend it.

#12 ~janie

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Posted 28 November 2011 - 09:22 PM

I am lucky, I love to trim!

I center my pot on a bat, then take my sponge full of water and squeeze the water out around the pot. Tap the pot to set up suction, and trim and trim! Without clay lugs, I can run a trimming tool to the bat, if needed. To remove, just pick up your bat and twist gently, the pot comes loose!

For unusual shapes, I use a chuck and a bit of clay. Lugs to hold the chuck, the bit of clay on top of the chuck to secure the pot.

For me, trimming makes my pots look 'finished'.

#13 SShirley

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Posted 29 November 2011 - 09:14 PM

I tried to think of a cheap way to mimic this system, since I can't afford to buy it. So I got a pizza pan at Wal-mart for 97 cents, and four welding magnets at harbor freight for $5. I partially wrapped the magnets with scraps of foam held on by carpet tape. The pizza pan is held to a bat with an old bat grabber. It works GREAT on pots that aren't real tall. I haven't tried it on anything tall yet, but I have my doubts. If anybody is interested, I can post a photo.

Sylvia

#14 phill

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Posted 06 December 2011 - 07:28 PM

i actually really enjoy trimming. it is one of my favorite parts of pottery!

i used to find centering the piece really annoying and tedious. however, after apprenticing with S.C. Rolf you learn a few things. he taught me a sweet way to center your pots and it works with small and large things alike.

the gist: put your pot upside down on the wheel aiming for the middle. turn your wheel on slow-medium speed (slow enough where it wont slide off the wheel when running) and tap the pot towards the center where it is off. the centrifugal force aids in making the pot become centered.

how to start: at first, this method is a little frustrating because it seems hit or miss, literally. however, steve (rolf) can center his pots in two or three hits almost every time, making centering go by in about 1 second. okay so i have your attention right? he told me to start by using an old coffee tin, like a folgers one and put some wads of clay in it to weigh it down. then if it slides off the wheel, who cares! he said just practice 5 minutes before or after your throwing session every time, and you will be pro at it in no time at all.

ps - once the pot is centered, put some wads down to keep it there by holding the pot down with one hand and putting 3 wads equidistant from each other.

so, my advice is dont spend your money! steve rolfs method works for many things, like odd shapes too. the only things it doesnt work with are lips of pots that are differing heights to the point where the pot sits at a slant on the wheel.


also, with anything pottery, i always revert back to a warren mackenzie saying: "just make pots." the more you make, the easier trimming becomes, the easier throwing, glazing, firing, cleaning, decorating, everything becomes. you just get used to the material. art takes time. dont rush it! just work hard.

#15 claydame

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 09:00 PM

I'm fairly new to pottery and find trimming a real hassle. Has anyone tried the Bailey Quick Trim Bat? What's your opinion of it?



#16 claydame

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 09:03 PM

Wow you guys are great! Thank you for all your input. It's been very helpful. I think I'll keep my money for the time being and see if I can master the Folger can and ultimately my pots with that method.

#17 Sojourner

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 09:41 PM

I am lucky, I love to trim!

I center my pot on a bat, then take my sponge full of water and squeeze the water out around the pot. Tap the pot to set up suction, and trim and trim! Without clay lugs, I can run a trimming tool to the bat, if needed. To remove, just pick up your bat and twist gently, the pot comes loose!

For unusual shapes, I use a chuck and a bit of clay. Lugs to hold the chuck, the bit of clay on top of the chuck to secure the pot.

For me, trimming makes my pots look 'finished'.


What kind of bat are you doing this on? I assume a masonite or wonderbat would work poorly with this method ... don't know about the Medex bats, they're supposed to be both waterproof and not waterproof (manufacturer claims they have similar release properties to the duron and wonderbat bats, yet be waterproof, kind of confusing) and I don't own a single plastic bat.

#18 Sojourner

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 09:45 PM

i actually really enjoy trimming. it is one of my favorite parts of pottery!

i used to find centering the piece really annoying and tedious. however, after apprenticing with S.C. Rolf you learn a few things. he taught me a sweet way to center your pots and it works with small and large things alike.

<snippage>
... at first, this method is a little frustrating because it seems hit or miss, literally. however, steve (rolf) can center his pots in two or three hits almost every time, making centering go by in about 1 second. okay so i have your attention right? he told me to start by using an old coffee tin, like a folgers one and put some wads of clay in it to weigh it down. then if it slides off the wheel, who cares! he said just practice 5 minutes before or after your throwing session every time, and you will be pro at it in no time at all.


This guy can tap center with his eyes closed

I wish I could center that fast eyes open!

#19 phill

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 06:46 PM

This guy can tap center with his eyes closed

I wish I could center that fast eyes open!


hahaha i was just about to post that! nice find

#20 Mark C.

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 10:41 PM

Tap centering is a skill one can easily learn-I was taught it in collage in the 70's
Throw 30 cereal bowls-wait one day- trim 30 bowls while tap centering
when you have finished you will have this skill for life

That said I own a dedicated wheel just for trimming with two giffen grips-one set for larger forms one for small forms and off center work-which is where tap centering comes in then tighten the off center grips,Also own the huge giffen platter trimer which he developed after years of guys like me asking him for one. Brian does listen to customers
The baily looks like the magnets stick up and would thump your fingers-I have not tried it.
Mark
Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com




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