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cstovin

Engobes And Mid-Fire Glazes

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HI all

I have been scouring Google, and I can't find much information on using englobes and combining them with mid-fire glazes?  I know the studio I used to take lessons with would for example roll a leaf into a plate, cover the surface with a black englobe and then fire; after it was initially fired, he would then use a combination of mid-fire glazes - 

 

I can't remember if this was the correct sequence; what glazes work well (cone 6) with englobes, or anything about how to even approach this :)

 

Any info would be much appreciated!

C

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if you are searching for englobes, you may not find it.  try without the letter L.  engobe is the word for a covering on greenware that you may or may not later cover with glaze.

 

your description does not have much info in it,  what are you trying to end up with?  many of us use slip and glaze on pots in various ways.

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One thing I have noted in my use of engobe is that if I apply it in one thick coat it cracks and looks quite unpleasant. 

 

Several light coats is better. 

This is all I know. 

Oh, one more fact: Engobes are generally matte so if you want a glossy, food-safe finish you must cover with clear. 

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I was trying to find out what mid-fire glaze combinations you could use with a black or red engobe?  I can't remember what they used to do at the art center I used to go to; and I can't find much information on using engobes with mid-fire glazes. 

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you appear to be looking for information on a general subject, covering a pot with an engobe and then covering the pot and engobe with a glaze.  yes, you can do that.

 

that is as unspecific a question as asking someone how to use paint.   for a house, a picture, a car, or what is not mentioned.  there is not enough information in your question for anyone to give you an answer.

 

yes, you can use engobe and glaze together on the same pot.  mid fire has no meaning in that context because you can use engobes with all temperatures.  

 

are you looking for specific recipes for a particular cone or type of clay?  more info, please.

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The approach I use on anything when I do not have enough specificity from feedback from here and other resources is simple: try it and see. (& take notes & pictures.) 

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what is the red engobe made of? red iron oxide? ask at the studio or look at their fact sheet. if it is it probably will turn black under the glaze. 

 

are you trying to do this work at home now? are you affiliated with a studio and have access to their glazes and other materials? what kind of materials do you have or are you trying to start your own studio and wondering what materials to buy?

 

i am a little lost of what you are trying to do.

 

if you are at a studio where you have access to their material then study their test tiles. hopefully they will have tiles which shows one dip glaze and two dip glaze examples along with colour combination examples. study those tiles and see which ones look translucent. and then test, test, test. if you talk to others you might have some answers but not all that you seek.

 

if you are starting a studio then i'd say go with underglazes than engobes. or even slip that you could use mason stains on. 

 

another way to deal with imprints are oxides that you can use on bisqueware. 

 

where you are located will also help with answers. 

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