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Qotw: What Form Do You Least Enjoy Creating, Whether Thrown Or Handbuilt, And Why?


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#21 ChenowethArts

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Posted 23 September 2016 - 08:32 AM

Plates and platters are my Achilles heel.  In my mind, I know that they are not difficult to throw and I have the extreme compression part pretty well under control....but then; when it is time to trim it seems like I have more trimmings scattered around me than I have plate/platter.  And, I seem to end up with pieces that are too thin that warp like crazy when fired, or so thick that they might get confused with one of those slide-on weights for barbells (hmmm, maybe there is a market for that).  I think I make one platter each year just to remind me why I don't enjoy making them.

 

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#22 Diesel Clay

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Posted 23 September 2016 - 09:06 AM

I can't bring myself to make yarn bowls. As a knitter, I think they're a poorly designed tool. As a potter, most of them are just ugly. It's not always the potter's aesthetic choices, they're just bad as a form.
I make a knitting jar with a wide opening in the lid instead.
edited to add photo.

SO your knitting stays with that lid till it is finished, well there's a way to make those last wee bitties get finished, unless you have an endless supply of jars.. I guess you could have
I guess with a wide enough mouth you can get everything through except maybe a big throw!
Or you just break the yarn!

The opening is large enough to get most projects through, even sweater parts. You're right, though, you are committed if you're working on an afghan or something else large.its a fair sized jar: it starts as 3 lbs.

#23 What?

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Posted 23 September 2016 - 09:41 AM

I guess it would be a tea pot. I have never attempted one. I have bought a few over the years; never used one of them. I am not a tea person. The thought of making basically a covered jar with a handle and spout; to many pieces. Now I will have to make some. Thanks a lot.



#24 SydneyGee

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Posted 23 September 2016 - 11:14 AM

Never have made a Yarn bowl-with no plans on making them. I have not had enough requests on them.

I struggle on tumblers and do not like making them

Any time i make a new form I need to get enough requests so I know the market wants it. 

Whatever comes in something is going out as my make list is always 30-35 forms-I do not let it get over than.

Forms long gone from that list are planters,pincushions (nobody sews much anymore)oil lamps ,aromatherapy lamps,colanders ,tea sets,saki sets,Jugs.Water crocks with spigots-

They have all been replaced with better sellers-casserroles are going away soon as well-slow sales

 

That is interesting you do not get requests for tea sets/planters. It seems all people want of me are teapots and small planters! Mini succulent gardens are an exploding fad down here...


 

 

 

Might as well admit it, i'm addicted to clay....


#25 SydneyGee

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Posted 23 September 2016 - 11:24 AM

I guess it would be a tea pot. I have never attempted one. I have bought a few over the years; never used one of them. I am not a tea person. The thought of making basically a covered jar with a handle and spout; to many pieces. Now I will have to make some. Thanks a lot.

 

To me, they are a very fun challenge. I love making the lips to hold the lid (although, it makes them a lot more fragile and I have to be careful not to bump the insides). The hardest part is making 2 or 3 lids to fit, mine tend to shrink unevenly thus I throw several and hope one matches :rolleyes: Attaching the nozzle is also a learning curve, so is the form of the handle.... hmmm a lot of work but I drink a lot of tea...

 

 

Sydney, 

I feel your pain. I had problems with long chalice stems for my communion sets. In the end I ended up making a chuck using basic plumbing parts that I use on my Griffin Grip. They are readily available at Lowes. You can see it in action at my blog site.

 

best,

Pres

 

I desperately want a giffin, but I just can't see myself spending the $$$ just yet when I don't really sell enough vases/long neck forms to justify the cost! I can tap-center bowls/mugs in under a minute, so for now I will stick with rolling wads of clay for adhesion and trimming the old-fashion way!

 

 

I love to belly out vases, but I honestly just hate trimming them. I struggle with finding/making chucks that hold the form well to trim (I prefer to throw a little thicker on a vase since I work with soft clay then trim afterwards). There are few forms I don't like making, but plenty I dislike trimming ie: anything with a long or delicate neck, or something very tall and narrow.

 

The neck got warped when I was trimming it on the chuck.

 

 

 

attachicon.gif34.jpg

 

Why are you trimming them upside down? Why not just wet the bottom and stick it to the wheelhead and trim bottom to top? That is how I trim almost all my jars with skinny necks. Is that the wrong way or something. I just always did it that way.

 

Just realized maybe you put a foot on them? I dunno. All my jars and stuff have flat bottoms so I lick and stickum to the wheelhead and start trimming to get final shape I want.

 

 

I trim them upside down because I love feet. I put a very distinct foot on almost everything I make, it just appeals to me and screams "I was handmade!" (:


 

 

 

Might as well admit it, i'm addicted to clay....


#26 Babs

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Posted 24 September 2016 - 06:30 AM

Ssydney g throw a chuck which will allow your pot to be trimmed to nestle,secure it with a few dobs of clay and be supported by its shoulder. Can use the chuck again and again

#27 No Longer Member

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Posted 24 September 2016 - 06:59 PM

I'll say what I like most. i like making oysters most; why, cause you really have to try really hard to screw up an oyster..... ;) :lol:


Fit'in to hang this shizzle up fo' good....


#28 GiselleNo5

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Posted 24 September 2016 - 11:31 PM

 

I think large bowls. They take a lot of clay and IMO not challenging nor elegant. I'd much rather go taller with an interesting form.

Just my opinion. I promised one to a friend.(sigh)

 

Marcia

 

It's hard to make a large bowl interesting! The bigger the bowl the more work it is to make it look interesting and its just a bowl, so the insides is always filled with stuff and the outside is hard to see unless your looking at it below the table level. They are just not very rewarding to get super creative with.

 

 

I spent hours decorating these huge bowls with wildflowers then realized ... shoot ... can't really see the flowers when they're in use so what was the point ... The upshot is that I'm not going to make my super time intensive designs on the exterior of low bowls any more. Lesson learned the hard way.

 

So this round of throwing I made some bowls that will be slip trailed on the outside and just glazed a solid color. Well, I took a risk and carried on the slip trailing on the inside. Just a little, and I'll wipe down the texture a bit so it's not hard to clean. But so far I'm pretty excited with what it looks like and I'm going to explore ways to decorate bowl interiors without adding lots of texture. :D 


I create order from chaos. And also, chaos from order.

 

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#29 Pres

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Posted 25 September 2016 - 09:55 AM

Ssydney g throw a chuck which will allow your pot to be trimmed to nestle,secure it with a few dobs of clay and be supported by its shoulder. Can use the chuck again and again

A thick smoothed out bead of a silicone on the top/inside edge of a bisqued throwing chuck will do two things of help:

 

Less damage to the pot being trimmed as the silicone is cushiony,

The silicone will hold the piece in place a little better.

 

 

best,

Pres


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#30 SydneyGee

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Posted 26 September 2016 - 01:11 PM

Ssydney g throw a chuck which will allow your pot to be trimmed to nestle,secure it with a few dobs of clay and be supported by its shoulder. Can use the chuck again and again

 

 

 

Ssydney g throw a chuck which will allow your pot to be trimmed to nestle,secure it with a few dobs of clay and be supported by its shoulder. Can use the chuck again and again

A thick smoothed out bead of a silicone on the top/inside edge of a bisqued throwing chuck will do two things of help:

 

Less damage to the pot being trimmed as the silicone is cushiony,

The silicone will hold the piece in place a little better.

 

 

best,

Pres

 

 

I have never had luck with chucks. We have a million at the studio for every shape and form of tall neck vase or cylinder. I have ruined more pieces by marring them / dropping them / off centering / spinning them off the wheel than any other way. I like to think I am gentle and meticulous with adhering them to the chuck and wheel, but maybe I am just accident prone :rolleyes: 

 

I could try that silicone trick.... or just throw forms I can trim easily and save for a giffin :P


 

 

 

Might as well admit it, i'm addicted to clay....


#31 ayjay

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Posted 26 September 2016 - 04:29 PM

I think (after much deliberating) that it has to be goblets  -  it could have been tall long-necked things but the main problem with those is the trimming, not the throwing.

 

I shall try the silicone in the chuck, it sounds like a plan.



#32 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 08:29 AM

wine snobs don't like opaque goblets because you can't observe the color. 


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#33 Diesel Clay

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 04:06 PM

Sydney, are the bisqued chucks soaked prior to use?
If they're absorbing the water out of the clay wads holding them in place, they'll slip.

#34 ayjay

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 04:18 PM

wine snobs don't like opaque goblets because you can't observe the color. 

 

I've not yet made any that I thought were good enough to offer for sale, but my breakfast Orange juice seems to work OK, that's what I use them for.

 

Soaking the chuck is a good idea too, I usually just give them a squirt from my water sprayer, it's obviously not enough.



#35 Pres

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Posted 27 September 2016 - 06:27 PM

I think (after much deliberating) that it has to be goblets  -  it could have been tall long-necked things but the main problem with those is the trimming, not the throwing.

 

I shall try the silicone in the chuck, it sounds like a plan.

I made a chuck of simple plumbing parts to fit on my Griffin Grip that works really well for trimming 8-12" stems. I have some pictures on my web site I think.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . . http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

#36 SydneyGee

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 11:51 AM

Sydney, are the bisqued chucks soaked prior to use?
If they're absorbing the water out of the clay wads holding them in place, they'll slip.

 

Well that is a great idea :blink: I will try that, I have really been wanting to make some flat-sided bottles for flowers to decorate my desk at work.

 

 

 

Tao-Caicai-s-new-classical-ceramic-vase-


 

 

 

Might as well admit it, i'm addicted to clay....


#37 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 28 September 2016 - 12:08 PM

Sydney, are the bisqued chucks soaked prior to use?
If they're absorbing the water out of the clay wads holding them in place, they'll slip.

I don't soak my bisqued chucks. I do use a soft cloth between them and porcelain pieces I am trimming. I don't use wads. I just set my piece in the chuck and trim away.

Marcia


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