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Qotw: What Form Do You Least Enjoy Creating, Whether Thrown Or Handbuilt, And Why?

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Babs    385

Ssydney g throw a chuck which will allow your pot to be trimmed to nestle,secure it with a few dobs of clay and be supported by its shoulder. Can use the chuck again and again

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GiselleNo5    464

 

I think large bowls. They take a lot of clay and IMO not challenging nor elegant. I'd much rather go taller with an interesting form.

Just my opinion. I promised one to a friend.(sigh)

 

Marcia

 

It's hard to make a large bowl interesting! The bigger the bowl the more work it is to make it look interesting and its just a bowl, so the insides is always filled with stuff and the outside is hard to see unless your looking at it below the table level. They are just not very rewarding to get super creative with.

 

 

I spent hours decorating these huge bowls with wildflowers then realized ... shoot ... can't really see the flowers when they're in use so what was the point ... The upshot is that I'm not going to make my super time intensive designs on the exterior of low bowls any more. Lesson learned the hard way.

 

So this round of throwing I made some bowls that will be slip trailed on the outside and just glazed a solid color. Well, I took a risk and carried on the slip trailing on the inside. Just a little, and I'll wipe down the texture a bit so it's not hard to clean. But so far I'm pretty excited with what it looks like and I'm going to explore ways to decorate bowl interiors without adding lots of texture. :D 

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Pres    896

Ssydney g throw a chuck which will allow your pot to be trimmed to nestle,secure it with a few dobs of clay and be supported by its shoulder. Can use the chuck again and again

A thick smoothed out bead of a silicone on the top/inside edge of a bisqued throwing chuck will do two things of help:

 

Less damage to the pot being trimmed as the silicone is cushiony,

The silicone will hold the piece in place a little better.

 

 

best,

Pres

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SydneyGee    57

Ssydney g throw a chuck which will allow your pot to be trimmed to nestle,secure it with a few dobs of clay and be supported by its shoulder. Can use the chuck again and again

 

 

 

Ssydney g throw a chuck which will allow your pot to be trimmed to nestle,secure it with a few dobs of clay and be supported by its shoulder. Can use the chuck again and again

A thick smoothed out bead of a silicone on the top/inside edge of a bisqued throwing chuck will do two things of help:

 

Less damage to the pot being trimmed as the silicone is cushiony,

The silicone will hold the piece in place a little better.

 

 

best,

Pres

 

 

I have never had luck with chucks. We have a million at the studio for every shape and form of tall neck vase or cylinder. I have ruined more pieces by marring them / dropping them / off centering / spinning them off the wheel than any other way. I like to think I am gentle and meticulous with adhering them to the chuck and wheel, but maybe I am just accident prone :rolleyes: 

 

I could try that silicone trick.... or just throw forms I can trim easily and save for a giffin :P

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ayjay    119

I think (after much deliberating) that it has to be goblets  -  it could have been tall long-necked things but the main problem with those is the trimming, not the throwing.

 

I shall try the silicone in the chuck, it sounds like a plan.

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ayjay    119

wine snobs don't like opaque goblets because you can't observe the color. 

 

I've not yet made any that I thought were good enough to offer for sale, but my breakfast Orange juice seems to work OK, that's what I use them for.

 

Soaking the chuck is a good idea too, I usually just give them a squirt from my water sprayer, it's obviously not enough.

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Pres    896

I think (after much deliberating) that it has to be goblets  -  it could have been tall long-necked things but the main problem with those is the trimming, not the throwing.

 

I shall try the silicone in the chuck, it sounds like a plan.

I made a chuck of simple plumbing parts to fit on my Griffin Grip that works really well for trimming 8-12" stems. I have some pictures on my web site I think.

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SydneyGee    57

Sydney, are the bisqued chucks soaked prior to use?

If they're absorbing the water out of the clay wads holding them in place, they'll slip.

 

Well that is a great idea :blink: I will try that, I have really been wanting to make some flat-sided bottles for flowers to decorate my desk at work.

 

 

 

Tao-Caicai-s-new-classical-ceramic-vase-

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Sydney, are the bisqued chucks soaked prior to use?

If they're absorbing the water out of the clay wads holding them in place, they'll slip.

I don't soak my bisqued chucks. I do use a soft cloth between them and porcelain pieces I am trimming. I don't use wads. I just set my piece in the chuck and trim away.

Marcia

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