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#61 RonSa

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Posted 25 December 2016 - 09:06 AM

Unrelated to the story, I've often thought that wood turning and throwing pottery on the wheel have many similarities. I've even seen people throw with firm clay carving away the excess in a way very similar to wood turning. :)

 

 

Thank you, and yes I'm finding there are as many similarities as there are differences. I just learned a major difference... Glazes.

 

During the class I took another adult student mentioned while watching me trim a bowl that I should try woodturning


Ron


#62 JBaymore

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Posted 25 December 2016 - 11:08 AM

 

I am pretty much self-taught and taught by YouTube videos to throw on the wheel. I had nobody to tell me specifically but I finally figured out a few months in that nearly every form starts with a cylinder. It follows that if you are very good at making cylinders (which I had never focused on making because I personally find a plain old straight sided cylinder pretty boring as a shape) you have the foundation to make almost any form you want from there. One of the biggest breakthroughs I had was from a little sentence in a wheel throwing book; it made me realize that I was curving my bowls up and out all at the same time which was causing them to buckle and collapse if I took them too much bigger, so I ended up with very thick bowls and lots of clay to trim at the base. After I learned that from the book I started pulling up, then angling out before curving the shape I wanted. I now use less than half the amount of clay I was using for bowls. Before, was I making bowls? Yes. Did they look nice? Sure. I could have gone on making them that way forever. But it was the wrong way because it wasn't having the result I wanted. 

 

 

You are beautifully describing right there one simple story that shows why basically books and online content do not take the place that good hands-on, in-person instruction will do.  Those "revelations' that you came upon are some of the most BASIC points taught in the very first couple of intro throwing classes.  Someone watching you throw would pick up on the fact that you did not understand those concepts in an instant from watching what you were doing, ... and give you the necessary feedback. 

 

best,

 

.......................john


John Baymore
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#63 GiselleNo5

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Posted 25 December 2016 - 05:21 PM

 

 

I am pretty much self-taught and taught by YouTube videos to throw on the wheel. I had nobody to tell me specifically but I finally figured out a few months in that nearly every form starts with a cylinder. It follows that if you are very good at making cylinders (which I had never focused on making because I personally find a plain old straight sided cylinder pretty boring as a shape) you have the foundation to make almost any form you want from there. One of the biggest breakthroughs I had was from a little sentence in a wheel throwing book; it made me realize that I was curving my bowls up and out all at the same time which was causing them to buckle and collapse if I took them too much bigger, so I ended up with very thick bowls and lots of clay to trim at the base. After I learned that from the book I started pulling up, then angling out before curving the shape I wanted. I now use less than half the amount of clay I was using for bowls. Before, was I making bowls? Yes. Did they look nice? Sure. I could have gone on making them that way forever. But it was the wrong way because it wasn't having the result I wanted. 

 

 

You are beautifully describing right there one simple story that shows why basically books and online content do not take the place that good hands-on, in-person instruction will do.  Those "revelations' that you came upon are some of the most BASIC points taught in the very first couple of intro throwing classes.  Someone watching you throw would pick up on the fact that you did not understand those concepts in an instant from watching what you were doing, ... and give you the necessary feedback. 

 

best,

 

.......................john

 

 

Unfortunately for various reasons it was not an option to take a class. I live in a tiny town with limited pottery resources so pottery workshops, community studios, and college classes are few and far between and prohibitively expensive. At any rate though it's all taken me longer to learn on my own than it would have if I'd taken a class, I am very focused on figuring it out one way or another! I wanted to learn throwing for about three years before I ever got to try. 


I create order from chaos. And also, chaos from order.

 

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#64 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 09:27 PM

Have you looked into any of Antionette Badenhorst's online classes at Teachinart.com 

They run 6 weeks. She covers many throwing topics and focuses on Porcelain. 

Several others teach on that as well including me. See if they can fit into you schedule.you can run the

videos at you leisure and go to a chat room for discussions each week after a certain lesson.

http://teachinart.com/index.html

Marcia


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#65 glazenerd

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 08:01 AM

 

Mark said: Try knocking your pot off center and making it good again before its all pulled up to get feel for this. This is not for beginners .

Well, I am a beginner. I get freakin happy if a blob of clay goes around without being wonky. Sure Sure- you old pros going around kicking dirt in my face. Where is the love man?..... :D < like my new dentures?

 

Nerd



#66 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 09:02 AM

ew, clay in dentures. Not good. Besides getting a good start with a teacher, practice is the only way to really develop what you've learned.

Marcia


Marcia Selsor, Professor Emerita,Montana State University-Billings
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#67 Mark C.

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Posted 08 January 2017 - 05:04 PM

Nerd for those new dentures try additive A it really grips and adds flexibility .


Mark Cortright
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