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Mark C.    1,796

(Batch of teapots with no holes from the chamber  to the spout....)

you could sell them as diet teapots?

Or tea habit reduction teapots

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Babs    385

(Batch of teapots with no holes from the chamber  to the spout....)

you could sell them as diet teapots?

Or tea habit reduction teapots

Well at that moment, I was not thinking laterally, there was only one place I was going, to where the hammer hangs. After thinking, on doing the pour test, oh I forgot one etc...

AND no dogs jumped into t he truck that morning ,funny that, they just looked from afar with that "well it could have been worse" look they give from time to time.

And Marcia, didn't have my phone handy or I would have captured some of those antics.....hmm

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glazenerd    816

Well, guess I get to add to the list of epics in my pottery career.

 

I had filled my 16CF with thrown items from using my new wheel. I knew many of them still had higher moisture content, others were fairly dry. I candled the entire load at 130F for 16 hours, and then did a high candle at 190F for another 12 hours. I used a mirror to check for steam: checked it several times over a 30 minute period. No steam /moisture showed up, so I let it begin to climb to inversion temps. I checked on it about 4pm, when I opened the studio door I could see steam rolling off the top of the kiln. I quickly shut it down at 1189F, and slightly cracked the lid: the steam just poured out.  I must be getting old, I saw no visible signs of steam when I put the mirror up there several times.   I dread opening it when it cools.

 

Nerd

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Mark C.    1,796

Just get the shop vac out and get ready to vac up the shards as somewhere most likely something blew up.

Beginner pots are always to thick and take special care. Welcome to throwing 101.

The 16 hour candle should have done it except 130 is not hot enough to drive out the moisture -same deal with 190-need to increase slowly above those temps. Glad your electricity is next to free there in the rust belt.That would have cost me about 30$

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Nerd,

It could be steam coming from the bricks if it has been damp. My bricks have caused rusting spots on the steel jackets. It isn't from the pots because it is even on the floor ring.

 

When I am drying out large paper clay slabs, I first turn on the kiln for a few hours, then off just to dry it some. Humidity down here is usually low in the 80% range. Once I program the slow bisque, I hold it at 200 F for several hours, then continue slowly.Be

Marciacause of the nubs on the back of the slabs, and they rest on coils, there is ample room for steam to escape.

 

Marcia

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glazenerd    816

Mark: just over $3 -- remember though 3" brick with 1" fiber..  Those doing high firings or long ramp holds need to consider that when purchasing (for others)

 

Marcia:

I sure hope so, I know there was no steam on the mirror: does have me stumped. Woke up this morning to a bad thought, wondering if a stray cat got it there. I do leave the kiln door open, and I do leave the studio door open: and it has happened before...but I saw it before I closed the door last time.

 

Nerd

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glazenerd    816

Just came in from opening the bisq load: nothing cracked, nothing exploded: more importantly- no critters!

Marcia: will go with your call--moisture in the bricks.   Very weird event!  Back to firing.

Nerd

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Mark C.    1,796

Just came in from opening the bisq load: nothing cracked, nothing exploded: more importantly- no critters!

Marcia: will go with your call--moisture in the bricks.   Very weird event!  Back to firing.

Nerd

Nothing Epic about that

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Mark C.    1,796

If you have not yet blown up some pots I suggest doing it so you know what it like. It not if its when .May as well get it over.

I'm still pondering a 16 hour preheat.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I built a catenary kiln in Upstate NY and the bricks got wet while construction was underway. My first firing was like a cloud maker with so much steam coming from the bricks. It did eventually dry out.

 

Marcia

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Mark C.    1,796

I blew a small bottom piece out of two tumblers last week-they where very wet in middle of load-I only candled them 3 hours-should have done 4 hours.

I blew up a small off the hump lid as well. So small a mess I did not need a vacuum .

I would not call it epic.

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Chilly    329

Epic failure - failing to paint a blue picture and sell it for stupid money.  (Or a lump of clay entitled catastrophe and ditto.)

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