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cagl84

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Hi guys! My name is Courtney. I have been studying fine arts at Florida Altlantic University, focusing on ceramic sculpture. I have been visiting my dad, jrgpotts, for the summer. And of course making a mess of his studio. Sorry dad!

I would love some feedback on the form and on the glazing. I am a hand builder. Most of my work is organic inspired. I try to focus on movement and fluidity in my forms. I utilized two glazes. The dark area is a combination of a basalt glaze with an high cobalt percentage as the base coat and Lynnette's Opal, from john britt's mid range glazes book (pg 118), over top. The lighter area is Lynnette's Opal with copper/rutile and cobalt/rio washes over the textured area. 

Thanks in advance!

 

Courtney

 

 

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Very nice organic forms. Not sure the light opal shiny surface does much for the form. The forms are the strong point. Now you need to explore surface treatment to best enhance the form. Maybe a breaking glaze on the texture , or a stoney matt. Inside  contrast or same. These are further design decisions. try making several maquettes and try different surfaces on them to see what works best for you.

 

 

Nice to have access to your dad's studio.

 

Best,

Marcia

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I think the word Marcia wanted was maquette. Spell check can't always spell!

Fred, 

That is funny. I corrected it once but didn't notice the second time. Machetes are better used down here in the jungle.I have corrected it.

Marcia

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Hi Courtney!

I'll chime in on what Marcia & Fred have stated (excluding references to working with a sharp blade *grin*). Definitely continue to explore surface treatment. The differences between the smooth surfaces and the undulating rolls may not need as much color contrast as your glaze choices present.  The form looks to be strong enough to hold its own with, perhaps, more subtle contrast...perhaps a stain, terra sigulata, or just a matte finish juxtaposed next to a gloss (or heavily textured) surface area.

Thanks for being brave/adventurous enough to share your work on the forum.  I read that as a desire to grow...and we all need to embrace that idea!

 

Looking forward to seeing more of your work,

-Paul

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Hi Courtney:

If these are your beginners pieces, then I will be waiting with anticipation to see your mature artist pieces. :) Been looking at them for two days trying to decide what period they remind me of: there is something Roman/Greek about them. Plenty of surface/texture to explore color/ tone/ and depth with. I guess I would have to classify them as abstract: certainly every person viewing them would see different expressions in them: a good thing!! I do however think I would stay away from earth tones, the pieces have an earthy/natural raw look to them. Need to go through the gallery from NCECA this past March, seen a  glaze I think would look sharp on these.

**If you want an additional unique texture to them: just have Fred Sweet roll his beard across them before leatherhard!!!.. ROFL..sorry.

 

Nerd

 

Edit: I would be curious to know your inspiration for them?... think I know but

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As everyone else has stated, the forms are strong in themselves. It is the use of the multiple or breaking glaze on the deep relief that causes a problem. Imagine what camouflage would be like on your pot. Your present treatment of the surface is much the same. Now imagine using a white interior as you have with possibly a pearl luster, and an exterior with a plane medium range color or unglazed, stained surface.  You have so many shadows produced by the deep relief, that not much is needed.

 

Good beginnings, and high hopes for your future. . . 

 

best,

Pres 

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Courtney, 

Not sure any glaze is necessary.  Could you post a photo of greenware or bisque?

 

I do like the blue, though.  The photos make me think of breaking waves.

 

Cynthia

here it is bisque with washes on the punctured texture

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post-74459-0-56883700-1469408582_thumb.jpg

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Hi Courtney:

If these are your beginners pieces, then I will be waiting with anticipation to see your mature artist pieces. :) Been looking at them for two days trying to decide what period they remind me of: there is something Roman/Greek about them. Plenty of surface/texture to explore color/ tone/ and depth with. I guess I would have to classify them as abstract: certainly every person viewing them would see different expressions in them: a good thing!! I do however think I would stay away from earth tones, the pieces have an earthy/natural raw look to them. Need to go through the gallery from NCECA this past March, seen a  glaze I think would look sharp on these.

**If you want an additional unique texture to them: just have Fred Sweet roll his beard across them before leatherhard!!!.. ROFL..sorry.

 

Nerd

 

Edit: I would be curious to know your inspiration for them?... think I know but

The inspiration for this piece is actually another piece I did last semester. It was the beginning of the class, and the professor wanted to gauge our building knowledge. Requirements were it had to be 30 in tall, 25-50 lbs of clay, and express the concept of home and/or identity. And we only had 2 days to build it. So I built without any planning or intent, other than what "felt" right.

It was a very fun and stressful assignment. And I created something I am very proud of. It's not perfect, and there are areas that wish were different. But I really wanted to continue exploring the form. And that what I was attempting.

Here is the "inspiration"- although that sounds very pompous to be inspired by myself LOL

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As everyone else has stated, the forms are strong in themselves. It is the use of the multiple or breaking glaze on the deep relief that causes a problem. Imagine what camouflage would be like on your pot. Your present treatment of the surface is much the same. Now imagine using a white interior as you have with possibly a pearl luster, and an exterior with a plane medium range color or unglazed, stained surface.  You have so many shadows produced by the deep relief, that not much is needed.

 

Good beginnings, and high hopes for your future. . . 

 

best,

Pres 

Thanks for the camo analogy. I can see that.

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Here is the "inspiration"- although that sounds very pompous to be inspired by myself LOL

Actually in the clay arts, that sounds very normal. "You" will come out in every piece you make unless you are replicating for some reason. The whole idea of art is expression: so you did a good job of expressing yourself.

Nerd

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I might be off here, but I prefer the way it looked as bisque. The simpleness of the color really highlights the form, maybe go more of a matte silky white or something. Either way interesting work.

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I certainly prefer the bisque version. It emphasises the shapes and textures, and the sculptural quality. I think the shapes are so strong they get confusing when colours are added. Fantastic - literally!

 

Girts

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Bciske has a technique which I think would suit these forms, ie bisque stain/oxide wash off, then soda wash before the higher firing, The soda gives a subtle sheen, the washed stains take nothing away from his forms, check his stuff out he has a bit in the Gallery here.

Your forms are strong, I don't think they require the glazes you are trialling. Just MO .

Lucky you, dad with studio!

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Bciske has a technique which I think would suit these forms, ie bisque stain/oxide wash off, then soda wash before the higher firing, The soda gives a subtle sheen, the washed stains take nothing away from his forms, check his stuff out he has a bit in the Gallery here.

Your forms are strong, I don't think they require the glazes you are trialling. Just MO .

Lucky you, dad with studio!

Thank you. I will look him up. It sounds very intriguing.

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Unfortunately,  she lives in Virginia and was just visiting for a while.  She outshines me in the pottery category.

 

Jed 

It was very nice to have full access to your studio. It got my creative juices flowing, and now my head is buzzing with ideas. Which is wonderful! Except of course for the fact that now I am home and have no where to work. =/ Guess I'll just have to come and visit again! =)

 

Also, I had to get my talent from somewhere, dad!

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It is a real pleasure to experience this.

my daughter resisted clay, I guess because I was always covered in clay or stealing time to do clay.

Where is she now in her spare time? Attending pottery classes, even disappears when she comes home!!

I love it.

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wherever you are in virginia, you can find a place to learn and work.  toss a stone far enough and you will hit a potter. (thank heavens i am over the border in west virginia because one more knock on the head will the the end of me.)

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wherever you are in virginia, you can find a place to learn and work.  toss a stone far enough and you will hit a potter. (thank heavens i am over the border in west virginia because one more knock on the head will the the end of me.)

=)

I have been researching places with open studio time. So far I have found two places. One has open studio time everyday from 9-7ish but they require me to take one of their pottery classes first. I'm not opposed to that, however the class times are not the most convenient for me. The other place doesn't require a class. However they only have open studio time one day a week. So it comes down to time in studio and of course the money for their memberships/drop in rates.  But I'm still looking. =)

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Well I love love love your forms. Would like to see them with very matte glaze or no glaze at all. Have you ever thought of combining different colored clays (naturally colored ones) in making your pieces? Might be cool. 

 

Glazing can be so hard. One reason I started to raku a  lot was that I got tired of making nice forms only to wreck them with my glazing which was usually a poor glaze choice for the form.  . A shino glaze might work well on your forms.  And I can also see them as wall pieces.  Gl and show us your progress.  rakuku

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