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Darran

Decorating Fine Relief-Part 2

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Got some great tips and advice and tried some out.

I've added some photos to the gallery to show what's working and was not.

My glazing technique is still a bit rough but at this stage I'm grateful for all your help in fingind the process.

From the advice I've been given so far am I right in thinking;

-For super fine work, like the owl and fox I would be best using an oxide or making out of porcelain and using a very light wash?

-for the thicker line work, like the green man or cat plate, use an underglaze and wash back. Then clear glaze over the top?

 

I'm well aware of the limitations of my glazing skills so would like to offer some molds for others in the forum to try. Let me know if you want to try one, all I ask in return is you feedback on how things turn out. Once we get to perfect the technique the forum gets to name it.

 

Thanks again for all you advice and words of encouragement

Cheers

 

Darran

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What is a laser cut sprig mould? You are getting some great impressions.

 

I think you can split the decision into two areas, the application properties of the 'stuff' and the fired properties of the 'stuff'.

 

You have a scale of oxide really.

Pure oxide and water all the way to an underglaze (basically a glaze that doesn't melt, could call it a slip, maybe not enough clay for that) Each will have properties you may and may not like so try them both out. Why not try some mix of oxide, clay and flux to make your own underglaze. Also plenty of ways to remove the stuff from high spots so try them all too :D

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Hello Old Lady

As long as the drawing have clear outline it shouldn't be too difficult. Send me copy of a drawer and I will be more than happy to have a go.

The more people I have tinkering with them the better.

Thank you

Darran

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What is a laser cut sprig mould? You are getting some great impressions.

 

Hi Joel

Thanks for the advice.

What is a laser cut sprig mold? Good question. It's the closest thing I can find to describe the process.

Like a sprig mold, pressing the clay into a mold to get a raised relief pattern. I looking to replicate the process but to make a whole picture at once. Similar to screen printing. This should allow people to transfer complex images onto clay quickly and cheaply.

The laser cutting bit, well that's what's used to make the templates. Think of like a printer that burns away the image.

Does that make sense?

Wold it be worth while making a simple video from a potters perspective?

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Hello Preeta

That's the beauty of the technique you can etch it onto most things. But my findings so far;

Acrylic - etches nicely and hard wearing but the clay sticks to it on larger molds or stamps. Best to use for smaller stamps or molds under 1inch

 

Plaster board/ dry walling- etches really well and etches deeply as well,but very brittle, only good for a couple of uses.

 

Beech wood- again, really good to etch and hard wearing but you can get a bit of wood grain on the raised part of the molds

 

MDF medium density fibreboard - by far the best. Etches like wood, doesn't stick and a mold can be used about 50 time (although not tried it that many times yet).

 

As for price. A 300mm x 300mm sheet ( enough to do 6 mug designs templates cost £3 for acrylic or less than £1 for MDF.

 

As for getting them laser etched, most cities will have a maker space you can go and use one. A design around a mug would take 15 min to etch no matter now complex.

 

Hope that helps

 

Thaks

Darran

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