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cstovin

How To Mark Your Prices.....

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Hi all

I thought I had seen some posts on here before, but I couldn't find them, so forgive me.  I have seen the hang tag approach, and thought that was cute, but ....

 

When a person has a lot of different items, some functional and some non-functional - what do you feel is the most aesthetically pleasing way to put prices on your work so they do not distract from your work or your booth?

 

Forgive me again but:

Hang tags:  I hate hang tags: to me, they look sloppy; they fly all over in the wind; they litter your booth floor when they fall off; people always have to turn them over to read them.  Overall, I just think they make my booth look more like a thrift type booth than more upscale.

 

Round Sticky Dots:

These do have some advantages over hang tags; they don't fly around; however I still find they fall off and litter the floor of the booth; they don't stay on, so if things don't sell, I always have to reprice everything once they get unpacked again for the next show.  They do look slightly better to me than hang tags, but one other disadvantage is they are small; not everyone can read them.

 

Tent Cards: I tried these, but where I have so many items that vary in price and usage, it was almost like every item has to have it's own tent card; then they don't stay put either

 

So: What is your favorite method of marking your prices on your items so they still appear clean, professional, and pleasing - yet people don't have to search for the prices, can read the tags, and they stay where they are intended?

 

Thoughts?

Would love to hear what works for you and why.

 

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I use the 1/2 round removable white stickers-they stay on. I buy them by the case. They used to be made by avery now avery dropped that smaller size and they are made by Maco-stock # MR-808

called multi-purpose labels removable adhesive.

I did a show yesterday in the sunshine and not one stick came loose-you need to stick them on the glazed surface not the unglazed bottom of a pots for them to stick

I have used these for over 40 years with none of your problems 

 

If the 1/2 is not large enough as you mention use the 3/4 size. I have a gallery that I use that size on and it plenty big for any info on the tag as well as the price.

same deal -removable adhesive

 

I like the hang tag idea but I would spend to much time working with them with the amount of pottery I go thru.The stickers work well for me.

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Thank you - I actually didn't realize the round labels were sold with "removable " adhesive.  That is one thing I dislike about those, is that you peel them off to reprice, or whatever, and can't get the darn little things off :)

 

I am picky aren't I  :unsure:

 

Still would like to hear what works well for others

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I use little ceramic price markers, in two sizes. The small ones are for individual items, with the price written on with a dry-erase pen. The larger ones are for my "staple" items, the things that are displayed in bunches. The item name and price are applied with clear mailing labels.

 

I made these so they wouldn't move in a windy situation, and it saves time compared to pricing all of the staple items individually. I get lots of compliments on the price markers from customers. So much that I sometimes want to say "but what do you think about the pots?"

 

The only downside is that the dry-erase pen frequently gets smudged or erased by customers, so I have to keep an eye on them and fix them on a regular basis.

 

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post-1612-0-32086500-1467738479_thumb.jpeg

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I use little ceramic price markers, in two sizes. The small ones are for individual items, with the price written on with a dry-erase pen. The larger ones are for my "staple" items, the things that are displayed in bunches. The item name and price are applied with clear mailing labels.

 

I made these so they wouldn't move in a windy situation, and it saves time compared to pricing all of the staple items individually. I get lots of compliments on the price markers from customers. So much that I sometimes want to say "but what do you think about the pots?"

 

The only downside is that the dry-erase pen frequently gets smudged or erased by customers, so I have to keep an eye on them and fix them on a regular basis.

 

attachicon.gifimage.jpeg

 

This is brilliant!

 

I think I may try this for my studio tour! 

 

Mea, try writing it with a Sharpie instead of dry erase. You can get it back off with nail polish remover, alcohol, or even a dry erase marker but I would definitely try it out on one first before you do all of them. :) 

Pugaboo likes this

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Mea, try writing it with a Sharpie instead of dry erase. You can get it back off with nail polish remover, alcohol, or even a dry erase marker but I would definitely try it out on one first before you do all of them. :)

 

I just tried this and it worked! Could not smudge it with my fingers, but it came right off with nail polish remover. I'm a little wary about travelling with nail polish remover in my gear, but I will try it for my next show and see if it creates any problems. This is exactly the type of solution I was seeking ... something that can withstand customer fingers, but still can be changed by me any time.

 

Thanks Giselle!!

 

 

EDIT: After doing some reading about the potential hazard of keeping nail polish remover in a hot car, now I don't want to risk it. But again, this was the type of idea I'm looking for. Permanent for everybody except the person with a "key" to change it.

GiselleNo5 likes this

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hair spray works for sharpie removal.  i have only a large can, do not use it so i don't know if it is available in a "travel size" container.

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What I read is that all flammable liquids shouldn't be stored in a hot car. Sometimes my gear stays packed in my car for months.

 

I might try a combination of Mark's approach and Giselle's idea. Small, clear, removable labels, and a Sharpie. When I need to change the price, I can peel the sticker off.

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What I read is that all flammable liquids shouldn't be stored in a hot car. Sometimes my gear stays packed in my car for months.

 

I might try a combination of Mark's approach and Giselle's idea. Small, clear, removable labels, and a Sharpie. When I need to change the price, I can peel the sticker off.

 

Coloring over it with a dry erase marker will work too and then you don't have to worry about the flammable liquid. That might work better for you. The reason I discovered how to get rid of Sharpie marks is that I drew out a schedule with permanent marker on a white board thinking I was so clever but then discovered that the dry erase marker made it come right back off! 

Rae Reich likes this

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What I read is that all flammable liquids shouldn't be stored in a hot car. Sometimes my gear stays packed in my car for months.

I might try a combination of Mark's approach and Giselle's idea. Small, clear, removable labels, and a Sharpie. When I need to change the price, I can peel the sticker off.

 

 

Coloring over it with a dry erase marker will work too and then you don't have to worry about the flammable liquid. That might work better for you. The reason I discovered how to get rid of Sharpie marks is that I drew out a schedule with permanent marker on a white board thinking I was so clever but then discovered that the dry erase marker made it come right back off!

 

Holy cow, Giselle ... this works! It's a little time consuming, but I think that will be offset by all the time I save not fixing the erased prices. I will try it at my next show and see how it goes.

GiselleNo5 likes this

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Mea -your pricer markers really look great-they add a certain upscale sense.In your booth setting I think they would add as well. people like to discover things.

I have seen small smooth polished Japanese garden style rocks as price points as well.They have a similar feel.

In my setting I want every pot to be priced-no asking me about how much it is-even with that folks often miss the sticker. I had a guy ask about two bowls that where $120 each on the 4th show. Somehow he was blind to the sticker or maybe the price??Both had stickers

I tend to stick the small 1/2 inch rounds near the mug handles and others near the foot.

I do not think they make it look cheap but I keep them small in that 1/2 inch size.

My booth racks are to stuffed to allow your style of pricing. Mine as yours evolved over time. Its a pain to change prices which I tend to redo every year after xmas.Thats my biggest problem with the stickers.Going threw so many boxes of pots is a pain.

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Mea - I love your little price forms it's given me ideas to replace the foldovers I use to mark the baskets of spoon rests and other small items. Great idea and I use the fingernail remover wipes for my nails so am thinking I can toss a small packet of them in my toolbox for last minute changes. I dislike the stickers as the humidity here in Georgia can be awful and they always seem to curl up and come off at the worst time. I am thinking of doing a transfer with the item name and a dollar sign fired in then just have to write the number, that way it can be changed as needed but the rest of the wording will look pretty since I don't like my handwriting.

 

Thank you for sharing!

 

T

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What I read is that all flammable liquids shouldn't be stored in a hot car. Sometimes my gear stays packed in my car for months.

I might try a combination of Mark's approach and Giselle's idea. Small, clear, removable labels, and a Sharpie. When I need to change the price, I can peel the sticker off.

 

Coloring over it with a dry erase marker will work too and then you don't have to worry about the flammable liquid. That might work better for you. The reason I discovered how to get rid of Sharpie marks is that I drew out a schedule with permanent marker on a white board thinking I was so clever but then discovered that the dry erase marker made it come right back off!

Holy cow, Giselle ... this works! It's a little time consuming, but I think that will be offset by all the time I save not fixing the erased prices. I will try it at my next show and see how it goes.

 

 

 

YESSS! I'm so pleased I can't even tell you. :):):) 

Marcia Selsor likes this

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I did a show this past weekend, using the Sharpie/dry-erase pen combination. It was awesome! I did not have to fix a single price marker, even though customers touched them as much as usual. The few times when I needed to erase and change a price, it was a piece of cake. I am really excited to have this problem solved. Thanks again Giselle!

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