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Glazing Greenware

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I have a small studio.  I had almost enough bisque to do 2 glaze loads in a row. To fill the 2nd glaze load I need a few more pieces.  Any negatives to  throw them and glaze the green ware and mix in with my standard load?  I know some potters do one firing and no bisque.  The only negative that I am aware of is that the pieces will be very fragile.  I think I can be very careful for 3-4 pieces.  Any other considerations.  Thanks for any info.

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If you do, make sure you go slowly in the beginning, as you would if you were bisque firing. The greenware is mòre prone to blow if fired too fast.

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depending on how you apply the glaze, you should have no trouble mixing the two things in one firing.  make sure ALL THE GREENWARE is thoroughly dry when you put it in the kiln.  i would put the green pieces in the coolest part of your kiln, the bottom in my case.  

 

remember that how you apply the glaze will leave the green pieces damp so give them time to dry completely before firing everything.  no location for you has been given, if you are in a very humid place be sure the pieces are totally dry before you fire.  since they are finished, putting a fan on will not warp anything.

 

did i mention the importance of dryness???

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Cone 6 glazes on bmix clay  or I could do 266clay with just a liner glaze.

To hold all these ready to fire glaze pieces until I throw and do a bisque is almost impossible in my small studio.

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Leather hard would be best, but it also depends on how you're applying it. Spraying or brushing you could do either way. Dipping should be leather hard. Be aware that your glazes will not go on the same, drying time will be really long on leather hard, and some glazes just won't like it. It's probably going to take a fair bit of practice to figure it out. Personally, I would just fire the second load a little emptier and not risk ruining some perfectly good pots with a process you're not familiar with. Electric kilns are cheap to fire, so you're not wasting much energy by not having it totally full.

eloiseceramics likes this

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