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cstovin

Newbie Needs Help With Glaze Cone 6 - Can It Really Be This Hard?

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Hi all,

I am just starting to try mixing my own Cone 6 glazes, and I thought I would start with an easy one.  The recipe didn't really have a name, but only has 3 ingredients.

80% Alberta Slip

20% Frit 3134

4% Rutile

 

It is SUPPOSED to be Bluish (see attachment); I have tried this twice now, actually three times, and all I get is brown....

I tried:

 

80% Alberta Slip

20% Frit 3134 (3431?)

4% Rulte

 

I also tried:

80% Ravenscrag Slip

20% Frit 3134

4% Rutile

 

after doing more research, it said for alberta slip more than 50%, to calcine the rest.

 

Questions:

I have heard that I don't have to calcine the additional amount over 50% (30%

If I do, does anyone know any place that sells calcined alberta slip?  Or do I need to do it myself?

 

Thank you all for any advice - 

post-14131-0-40095600-1463762470_thumb.jpg

post-14131-0-40095600-1463762470_thumb.jpg

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If you're putting that rutile blue on too thin, it won't develop the blue colour, and it stays that amber tone. It also likes to pinhole, and run like snot when you get the thickness right. Leave yourself some space on your piece for it to travel, or some sort of foot that will catch drips. Edit: it also works better when it can borrow iron from the clay body beneath. You actually get the best results from this over a red clay body, or over an iron- bearing slip.

 

Calcining half the AB slip makes it so that it doesn't shrink too much as the glze dries, and flake off the pot. It's to help with application properties, and won't change the final colour. It'll help keep the glaze from crawling. If you want calcined AB slip, just put some in a bowl in your next bisque. I haven't heard of anyone selling pre-calcined stuff, but I haven't managed to read the whole internet yet either ;)

Rae Reich likes this

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Why would you think a glaze with fewer ingredients would be easier to mix well? I freely share my studio recipes. Most were tested in New Zealand with donated materials-- they are not too sensitive and have coped well with American ingredients because they were originally stolen from the finest places of the depths of the internet.

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Thank you all; I didn't necessarily mean a three ingredient glaze would be "easy", but easier in terms of only three ingredients to potentially trouble shoot, and much less to spend at first :)

 

I liked the comment about cheating lol

 

Thank you for suggesting it go on heavier, I thought the second time around two coats would be good; and I did mix it with a little less water but will try it again 

C.

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