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terraforma

Recommendations For Levelling A New Kiln Installation?

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I'm getting a new L&L Kiln in just a few days, and it will be installed in a room with a sloping (concrete) floor. The rep at L&L told me to use "metal shims" to level the kiln, but a quick google search doesn't seem to come up with metal shims for this purpose; there are very expensive options for precision situations like machinery, engines, etc. Now it's after hours for L&L, and I'm feeling desperate. Obviously, I can't use wood shims. If there's a very serious difference, can I use concrete pavers as part of the shimming? Just realized how dumb it is that L&L doesn't have leveling feet. :wacko:

 

I'd love to hear how others have shimmed up and leveled their kilns, or anyone who has a clever idea. Thanks!

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Large flat metal washers from the hardware store.  Or just pieces of flat scrap metal from a metal shop.  You probably won't need more than one or two.  Maybe 1/8 inch thick unless your floor is seriously un-level.  My L&L dealer used one or two metal tabs, nothing fancy. 

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Most kilns don't have leveling feet. All you need is large washers like Bruce said, or if those are too thick then get a small piece of sheet metal from the hardware store and cut it into appropriately sized pieces. The kiln doesn't necessarily have to sit level, it just needs to sit evenly, without rocking at all. 

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If there is a small steel company around you: they will have metal shims by the buckets full in 1/16, 1/8, and 1/4 thickness.Commonly used to level steel beams in new construction, or to raise tele-posts. Some local lumber yards who supply home builders will sometimes have them.If you have a handy type person in your family, they can use a level to predetermine how much leveling is required. Mark the back area of where the kiln is going to sit and then use a 2 or 4' level across the floor to where the front will set. Keep the level on the back floor and raise the front until it reads level. Note the distance from the floor to the bottom of the front of the level- that is how much you need.

Nerd

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The danger is not that the wood will catch fire during the first few firings. But what happens is that the repeated heating of the wood over the years lowers its flash point, and some day it will start to smolder and then you've got a problem. This is why kilns should never be set on wood floors. The other problem with wood shims is that they can compress from the weight.

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