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RoGryphon

Stoneware Hanging Planters

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If I was making a sitting planter, and intended to have drainage holes, with a tray underneath to catch the water, would I want a raise foot on the tray's bottom?  I intend to set it on an exterior, painted wood surface.  So I wasn't sure if having the tray flat on the wood wood help protect the wood surface from moisture, or trap it?

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I used to do a single piece hanging planter that had a drip plate attached. You throw it like a double walled pot, but instead of pulling the outside piece up and joining in you have two options. Option one would be to pull it out, and then join it in by hand in a clover type design looking down on the pot, or the second is to leave it pulled outward like a low bowl underneath the planter. Either way, after trimming, use a hole punch to add water/drain holes to the planter so that it can be watered from below. Put hole in top or add loops on the top of the planter itself for hanging.

 

 

best,

Pres

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If I was making a sitting planter, and intended to have drainage holes, with a tray underneath to catch the water, would I want a raise foot on the tray's bottom?  I intend to set it on an exterior, painted wood surface.  So I wasn't sure if having the tray flat on the wood wood help protect the wood surface from moisture, or trap it?

 

Having a foot on the tray is a good idea.  Cut notches in the foot ring also help to keep the wood from decaying due to trapped moisture.

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If I was making a sitting planter, and intended to have drainage holes, with a tray underneath to catch the water, would I want a raise foot on the tray's bottom?  I intend to set it on an exterior, painted wood surface.  So I wasn't sure if having the tray flat on the wood wood help protect the wood surface from moisture, or trap it?

 

Having a foot on the tray is a good idea.  Cut notches in the foot ring also help to keep the wood from decaying due to trapped moisture.

 

 

That's exactly what I was thinking.  Thanks!

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So I made a pair of slab flower boxes, that I had mentioned earlier.  They are a little over 20 inches long, by 8 wide by 8 tall.  

As I am not an expert green thumb, would boxes of that size need drainage holes, to prevent the potting soil from being overly saturated?  

My plan was to make some, but I haven't done so yet, and the boxes are drying.

 

Thoughts?

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they would be better with drainage.  try some holes that will drain into the slab tray that is a little larger than the boxes.  selling them together will make the whole thing more professional looking.  make sure the tray height will allow some of the water to drain but not run over the edge of the tray.  an inch or so, don't forget shrinkage works vertically, too.

 

pictures???

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With drainage holes you can plant direct into the boxes, but need a saucer or position them where drips will not be a problem.

 

Without drainage holes you can plant into an ordinary (plastic?) plant pot and use your box as a cover, with no need for a saucer.

 

Generally I use "with holes" outdoors and "without holes" indoors.

 

Note I've said "can" not "must" or "should".  All things are personal choice.

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Not selling these oldlady. They are a Mother's Day gift for my Wife... At least they will be if they turn out..

 

Here is a pic: http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/7632-boxes-in-the-kiln/

 

I'll try and post an embedded photo later.

 

Note: I originally intended to fire the boxes horizontally, but despite measuring and remeasuring, they are an inch or so too big. I must have some of that clay that expands as it dries.... *cough*

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The texture is from an old wall paper print roller.

 

Still deciding on the color scheme. Maybe some type of stain, or similar distressed/ age look with a partially wiped off glaze.

 

First thing is first. They have to survive tomorrow's firing.

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Survived the firing(s).  They warped during the bisque, possibly due to the fact I had to fire them on end, possibly due to the clay memory.  It honestly doesn't bother me.

 

Here is a link to the gallery, with update pictures:  http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/album/1191-planter-boxes/

 

Specifics:  

-Slab built with a low fire white clay, press texture from antique wooden wallpaper roller and bisqued to Cone 04

-Jewel Brown glaze brushed on top and bottom trim, feet, and in recessed texture.  Federal Blue glaze brushed over top of the textured areas

-Tarnished Brass glaze on the interior and bottom.

-Glaze fired to Cone 05.

-Filled with potting soil.

-Planted with Petunias, Dahlia Hybrids and Begonias 

-Watered and heated to Cone 050...

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HOW DID YOU DO THAT! :o

 

 

If I could venture a guess.  Thrown and altered form (Cut top and carved sides), with an oxide stain to emphasize the carved bits?

 

 

It's hand built, I'll post some demo pics of how I did it later today. Yes on the iron oxide / gerstley borate wash.

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HOW DID YOU DO THAT! :o

 

 

If I could venture a guess.  Thrown and altered form (Cut top and carved sides), with an oxide stain to emphasize the carved bits?

 

 

Ben and OldLady, i just posted some pics in my gallery on how to do this

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