Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Emmacarlisle

My First Wheel

Recommended Posts

Hi Guys,

I'm new to the forum and considering buying my first potters wheel this year.

I already own a kiln (a Comet ECO P59240-E from Pottery Craft) and have been hand building for a little while. I'm just coming to the end of a 10 week throwing course and feel that a wheel is the right step for my little online shop.

I went to view a 2nd hand wheel this week but quickly realised it was big and noisy, because of this I'm leaning towards a Shimpo Whisper but I've also read great things about Brent wheels.

I'm used to throwing on wheels with bigger splash pans - because of the smaller size does it normaly get quite messy?

Can anyone reccomend models of Brents to look at? Are they noisy machines?

 

As these wheels don't tend to come up 2nd hand I'm thinking of buying new - my shop has around £1200 to spend but could spend more if the right wheel came along - is this a healthy budget?

I found when I was buying my kiln there were lots of little bits that I didn't think about buying which all added up! Should I be expecting this with the wheel also?

Thanks in advance and any info/tips/recommendations (for any wheels!) would be useful!

Emma

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Emmacarlisle,

I am in the same place you are except I do not have a kiln and am not considering one yet. I would suggest to read these forums and search for information about wheels. The gist of what I have read is that everyone has a different opinion about what is best. Someone on a forum said that the wheel does not matter as much as the potter's skill.

 

First and foremost, you must consider what are you going to do with your wheel and how much you are going to produce. That determines how much power you need. Opinions about the Shimpo whisper are found in the forums.

 

Wheels, according to what I have read on these forums, do come up used, but you constantly must be looking, spreading the word you want a ,wheel and even then, it may be difficult to find one.  Â£1200 is about 1665 in American dollars. You should be able to find an excellent wheel if you spend that amount. It could be a top level wheel most likely.  There are wheels for $1000-$1300 that are equally good as well as some in the $800-900 range that some people swear by as their studio wheel.

 

Short answer about the "little bits" you will need is YES. You will need quite a few things many of which you might be able to make if you are handy or know someone who is.  You need to consider where you are going to do your potting and how you will set up your "studio" or space.  As an example, you need to consider places to dry the ware you create. Shelves, tables, somewhere that you can put your final products. You will need to consider how and where you will do the wedging. Are you going to make a table, use something you have? Recycling the clay is another consideration. At the very least, you will need buckets to put your scraps from trimming, a place for putting clay for recycling. You tube videos from Ceramic Arts Daily can show you skills, but you also get to see some studios and can get an idea of how their have their space set up.  Some people work in their garage which could work if you are in a warm climate. 

 

I have only used the Brent at the college where I am taking Ceramics. We have 10 wheels in total and 3 kick wheels that do not have any motor attached. They range from an old Brent Classic to the CXC.  Some of them make a whining noise, but I think it is because the college never services them. There are 6 classes a week twice a week and one on Saturday so they get a work out. I can tell the difference between the lower Classic and B  Brent and the higher level C and CXC.  I  like the bigger wheel head of 14 inches--not sure why, I just found myself liking that and tried to at a wheel that had one. I think the foot controllers are a bit "uneven" for lack of a better word, but again, I think they take a great deal of abuse considering they in use 6 days a week with so many different people. Again, there are many forum discussions about the Brents. The problem is once you read the forum and want to find it again, it can be difficult to find it again.

 

I am sure much more experienced and knowledgeable people than I could tell you more.

Carole

Emmacarlisle likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a link I found when I was looking for a post I saw a while back. I seems a good source of information for you about what things you will need in addition to the wheel.http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/topic/13056-setting-up-and-basic-tools-for-the-total-beginner/?hl=%2Bhow+%2Bmuch+%2Bthe+%2Bprice+%2Bnew+%2Bshould+%2Bused+%2Bwheel&do=findComment&comment=95667

Emmacarlisle likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Go to the main CAD forum page and type "buying new wheel" in the search box. That will give you a number of threads where buying wheels have been discussed. Lots of good advice and opinions on various manufacturers.

 

FWIW, my wheel is a Shimpo Whisper . . . no regrets.

Emmacarlisle likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love my Brent ie-x. Reverses, has large wheelhead, very quiet, & can convert to tabletop. For me, the potters chair was as important as the wheel, so I invested in the Speedball saddle chair-huge difference on my body over common potters stools. 

Emmacarlisle likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Emmacarlisle,

I am in the same place you are except I do not have a kiln and am not considering one yet. I would suggest to read these forums and search for information about wheels. The gist of what I have read is that everyone has a different opinion about what is best. Someone on a forum said that the wheel does not matter as much as the potter's skill.

 

First and foremost, you must consider what are you going to do with your wheel and how much you are going to produce. That determines how much power you need. Opinions about the Shimpo whisper are found in the forums.

 

Wheels, according to what I have read on these forums, do come up used, but you constantly must be looking, spreading the word you want a ,wheel and even then, it may be difficult to find one.  Â£1200 is about 1665 in American dollars. You should be able to find an excellent wheel if you spend that amount. It could be a top level wheel most likely.  There are wheels for $1000-$1300 that are equally good as well as some in the $800-900 range that some people swear by as their studio wheel.

 

Short answer about the "little bits" you will need is YES. You will need quite a few things many of which you might be able to make if you are handy or know someone who is.  You need to consider where you are going to do your potting and how you will set up your "studio" or space.  As an example, you need to consider places to dry the ware you create. Shelves, tables, somewhere that you can put your final products. You will need to consider how and where you will do the wedging. Are you going to make a table, use something you have? Recycling the clay is another consideration. At the very least, you will need buckets to put your scraps from trimming, a place for putting clay for recycling. You tube videos from Ceramic Arts Daily can show you skills, but you also get to see some studios and can get an idea of how their have their space set up.  Some people work in their garage which could work if you are in a warm climate. 

 

I have only used the Brent at the college where I am taking Ceramics. We have 10 wheels in total and 3 kick wheels that do not have any motor attached. They range from an old Brent Classic to the CXC.  Some of them make a whining noise, but I think it is because the college never services them. There are 6 classes a week twice a week and one on Saturday so they get a work out. I can tell the difference between the lower Classic and B  Brent and the higher level C and CXC.  I  like the bigger wheel head of 14 inches--not sure why, I just found myself liking that and tried to at a wheel that had one. I think the foot controllers are a bit "uneven" for lack of a better word, but again, I think they take a great deal of abuse considering they in use 6 days a week with so many different people. Again, there are many forum discussions about the Brents. The problem is once you read the forum and want to find it again, it can be difficult to find it again.

 

I am sure much more experienced and knowledgeable people than I could tell you more.

Carole

Thanks so much for all of this Carole

I'm all set up studio wise and I've got a nice rack of shelves which are perfect for drying pots/fired mugs.

I've had a read through some of the posts but I will carry on researching and looking, Its a big investment so don't want to rush into it! Thanks for letting me know about the Brents, really interesting that you can tell difference between the machines. 

Emma

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Go to the main CAD forum page and type "buying new wheel" in the search box. That will give you a number of threads where buying wheels have been discussed. Lots of good advice and opinions on various manufacturers.

 

FWIW, my wheel is a Shimpo Whisper . . . no regrets.

Thanks!

I've been researching into the Whisper and it does look excelllent!

Have you had any trouble with the splash pan leaking though the join? Thats the only negative I've heard about it

Emma

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love my Brent ie-x. Reverses, has large wheelhead, very quiet, & can convert to tabletop. For me, the potters chair was as important as the wheel, so I invested in the Speedball saddle chair-huge difference on my body over common potters stools. 

Thanks LeeU

I hadn't even thought about the stool so thats great advice! :)

Emma

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you had any trouble with the splash pan leaking though the join? Thats the only negative I've heard about it

Emma

No different than the Brent splash pan on the wheels I learned on. I've really not noticed. Better yet, learn to throw with less water. Or -- as some will recommend -- skip the splash pan completely when throwing.

Emmacarlisle likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 it is likely there is a manufacturer somewhere near you.  you can visit suppliers and see what is being offered.  for that size purchase, i would think someone would allow you to try a wheel in their facility.  i tried two when i bought mine and am very glad i got the one i did, not the other one.

 

where are you?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of large name wheels are fantastic. They all have their little bells and whistles and power. Pedal responses are different but you will adapt to it. Leg extensions are a big one but nothing a few blocks can't fix. Wheel head size is important down the road should you want to throw big(25-100+lbs) I'm with Mark on that it is important to have service and parts for a wheel. This will be something a potter uses for decades to come. I have hose connections in my Shimpo splash pans to drain to 5 gallon buckets; no flooding easy clean up. I would one day like to own a Brent CXC just saying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I, too, will be looking for a second wheel. One thing I'm considering—and you also might want to—is whether you would prefer a removable splash pan that you have to take to the sink to wash, or one with an integral splash pan, such as the Brent, that you have to sponge down.

 

One plus for the removable splash pan is more versatility—if you wanted to throw huge bowls and platters, for example, you could simply remove the splash pan to make room for a huge bat; with an integral splash guard, you might need to attach a "riser" bat so the bottom of the piece is raised above the level of the splash guard.

 

On the other hand, not carrying the splash pan to the sink might be a bonus for you.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I doubt I will ever purchase a wheel with a fixed splash pan. I guess I am a Brent/Shimpo guy.

 

Actually I am disappointed with both Brent and Shimpo for continuing to make the wheel body wider than it needs to be. I want to be able to sit close and not be doing the splits. When I get around to making my own wheel that issue will be fixed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the built in splash pans of the Skutt/TS wheels. They hold a ton of slop, and are easy to clean. Sponging them out it no more difficult than cleaning a removable pan in the sink, plus you're not going to be cleaning it up all shiny every day like in a community studio anyway. I scoop mine out when it gets full, then get back to throwing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I doubt I will ever purchase a wheel with a fixed splash pan. I guess I am a Brent/Shimpo guy.

 

Actually I am disappointed with both Brent and Shimpo for continuing to make the wheel body wider than it needs to be. I want to be able to sit close and not be doing the splits. When I get around to making my own wheel that issue will be fixed.

These are hard to come by Mathew but the original Brent model A is just that wheel very small and only as wide as a wheel head.Not the current Brent model a or ae.

It took many years for me to track one of these tiny wheels down

With a wheel this small it uses some no standard parts that most Brent wheels do not use-like smaller pulleys and belt and super small controls inside

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have two Brent's (C and CXC). I don't mind the two part pan, but if using too much water the pans can leak. It forced me to lean to throw drier and to remove my pots without floating off the wheel. No problem. Working over the back of the pan to the little shelf is a little tedious, but not a deal breaker. Love my wheels.

 

If I had to purchase a brand new one the Scutt with removable pan would probably get my dollars all other things being equal. I like the removable wheel heads on the Scutt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you looked at these guys? They have a branch in Doncaster as well as Devon (where I am) and they are very helpful - with good prices.

 

http://www.ctmpotterssupplies.co.uk/potters_wheels.htm

 

I don't have a wheel yet, but saw one in there yesterday and thought it was more affordable than I expected. Their Shimpo would come well within your budget. Or their Rohde!

 

Girts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.