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#41 Guest_The Unknown Craftsman_*

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 04:56 PM

Should be some more great posts here!
Keep smilin'!

#42 trina

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 05:03 PM

Hi everyone! Those are some really great introductions. My name is Trina Doerr and I have a small pottery and paintong studio in southern Spain. I have been living here for about the last twelve years and just opened my studio about two. years ago. It has been a struggle but things are finally starting to pay off. I have learned so much from the internet and other potters. I run classes two days a week and pot for myself the rest of the time. I sort of struggle with the term artist, basically I just love making stuff! This year I finished a large mural project and if anyone wants to see it you can have a look on youtube. Its called Making a mural by Trina Doerr. If anyone wants any advice on this kind of project just ask, I know exactly what i did wrong!!! Anyway look forward to participating on the forums and getting the chance to exchange. I would like to know what inspires everyone!

#43 claclana

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 10:01 PM

Hello Buckeye and all!
this forum as being a great help, and this site is full of data: thank you, this is a GREAT community!Posted ImagePosted Image

I live in Buffalo, NY, Moved from NYC 10 years ago (originally from Buenos Aires, Argentina) worked as mosaicist for eons (mostly commission-murals), adding volume to the surface with carved wood or cement, so when "discovered" clay 1 year ago was a breakthrough, where was clay all my life!? THIS is my material! hand build and extrusions so far takes all my doings, love it, just playing with forms, not with surfaces neither colors, SO much still to explore, ...love it.
My old website is www.mosaicNY.us (or www.ClaudiaNagy.com) and the ceramic works are at www.IntrinsicStillness.com, sold some works in 2 locals gallery shows, and trying to start on Etsy but requires so much time with the photos, word etc etc!


#44 phill

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 12:19 AM

Hello everyone!

my name is phill schmidt. i live in mn, i am 24, i make functional work in the cone 10 redux style, and am getting married soon! i went from a biology major in school to an art major in ceramics. it was a crazy move for me, but God has made me a maker and thus making pots has been a wonderful way of making. after college and learning under the great Kirk Freeman, i took up an apprenticeship with master potter S.C. Rolf for a year--the apprenticeship only recently ended. i love posting on here, and i will say that i am much bolder in my talk here on the forum than in person. :rolleyes: i hope i dont offend anyone, or at least not deeply. i do love a good opinionated conversation though. i am young, i am bold(ish), and i love making.

i also really enjoy cooking. perhaps it has something to do with my love for food.

i also have a website, phillip-schmidt.com if you are interested.

phill

#45 lacemuse

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 10:24 AM

Hi! I'm new to the forum, too & new to pottery. I LOVE this site!! There's so much here to learn from!! I'm here every day reading the forum posts & watching videos!

I was inspired by Lyn Belisle's scent shards - faces from the past. I decided I could do it, so I followed her video instructions to learn the basics. I make a clay mold of the face of a statue, then use low fire earthenware to make the faces, & add some hand-building to them. The point is for the bisque to still be porous enough to absorb essential oil, but to still be strong.

So, of course, I needed a small kiln & purchased a Paragon Firefly. I fired my molds last week - yay! I have 3 faces drying & they'll be ready to fire this week-end. I'm soooooooooo excited! Low fire bisque - unglazed. Easy peasy! We'll see how they turn out Sat. LOL!

Well, now that I have the small kiln that will fire low-fire bisque & low-fire glazes I needed to decide what other items I could make. I decided on small cups & bowls for starters. Well, now I decided I needed a wheel & to learn to throw them, so I purchased a wheel. I have a great DVD that I purchased from the store here on wheel throwing. I tried out the wheel & learned how to center right away. Yay again!!!

I have 2 weeks off starting the 19th, so I'll be practicing, practicing, practicing. I'm thinking about taking a pottery class in January from a highly recommended local potter, so I'll have a live person to help me with throwing.

OK, I've decided that I'll eventually need a larger kiln. The 4.5" height limit of the Firefly just isn't going to work for the larger pieces I'd like to do on the wheel. Providing I get good enough on the wheel, I'll be shopping for a larger kiln. I've already talked to an electrician, & got some recommendations from our local supplier. LOL!

I'm 59, so I don't have time to become a master potter, but I'm beginning to live this dream I've had for sooooooo many years!!

#46 SShirley

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 06:06 PM

OK, here's mine:

My name is Sylvia Shirley and I live in Pittsburg, Kansas. I'm 56 and have been doing pottery for about 18 years. (It took some math to figure that out... since my son was 17 and he's 35 now...gosh I feel old) I started taking classes for stress relief and loved it. I built my own kick wheel and turned a garden shed into a studio. I soon outgrew the garden shed and moved into my half of the garage. For years I tried to talk my husband into letting me get a building for a studio, but when I took over his side of the garage he finally relented. Four years ago we bought a run-down little building in town and I set up a gallery in part of it and a studio in the rest. It's about 1300 square feet total. Now I have two electric wheels and a big Skutt kiln and a slab roller. This is not a great town in which to be a potter. Sales are not great, but they are slowly growing. I just had my holiday open house with three friends, and it was pretty successful. People are starting to find me, but I do spend a lot of time explaining that this is not a "paint your own pottery" place, and I do not do children's birthday parties. My studio work is almost exclusively functional, cone 6 electric, but I have started doing some cone 6 crystalline which is a lot of fun - when it works. I also take a continuing ed class in Joplin every semester, where we get the use of the gas kiln, which is pretty nice.

#47 trina

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 01:00 PM

Hello new friends--

This is my first post and I know it won't be my last because, reading the other posts, I realize I have been hooked, line and sinker and all, into clay. I just turned 60 (and didn't enjoy it). I live in the desert of Southern New Mexico. I'm a baby doctor by day, a full-time potter in my dreams. I'd always wanted to try clay, with the intent to make myself a set of stoneware dishes. My adult son, who learned to throw porcelain while in college, found an octagonal electric Paragon kiln for $100 and brought it to me. This was a year ago. I got it set up in my garage and decided to give home made pie dishes for Christmas last year. I made so many mistakes in both creating pieces and glazing them that it's pretty funny. Luckily my loved ones indulge me.

Since then I've taken classes at Ceramics Plus of New Mexico and have learned the basics. I entered some pieces in our regional State Fair this fall and won a blue ribbon for a vase that I put metal pieces on--hence my name metal and mud. My son makes the metal pieces; we etch them with salt and hydrogen peroxide. I'm envisioning tumblers that feature an etched strip of metal. I decided to sell my pieces (I can't keep them all!!) and actually sold a clay basket last weekend. I start selling at our Farmer's Market on the 17th. I hand build only and love to put texture in my pieces, and glaze them nice colors. I'm saving for a wheel and look forward to that. Sorry this was so long-winded, but now you know the most important things about me!



#48 trina

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 01:04 PM


Hello new friends--

This is my first post and I know it won't be my last because, reading the other posts, I realize I have been hooked, line and sinker and all, into clay. I just turned 60 (and didn't enjoy it). I live in the desert of Southern New Mexico. I'm a baby doctor by day, a full-time potter in my dreams. I'd always wanted to try clay, with the intent to make myself a set of stoneware dishes. My adult son, who learned to throw porcelain while in college, found an octagonal electric Paragon kiln for $100 and brought it to me. This was a year ago. I got it set up in my garage and decided to give home made pie dishes for Christmas last year. I made so many mistakes in both creating pieces and glazing them that it's pretty funny. Luckily my loved ones indulge me.

Since then I've taken classes at Ceramics Plus of New Mexico and have learned the basics. I entered some pieces in our regional State Fair this fall and won a blue ribbon for a vase that I put metal pieces on--hence my name metal and mud. My son makes the metal pieces; we etch them with salt and hydrogen peroxide. I'm envisioning tumblers that feature an etched strip of metal. I decided to sell my pieces (I can't keep them all!!) and actually sold a clay basket last weekend. I start selling at our Farmer's Market on the 17th. I hand build only and love to put texture in my pieces, and glaze them nice colors. I'm saving for a wheel and look forward to that. Sorry this was so long-winded, but now you know the most important things about me!


I hoe you get this message, potter but totally computer illiterate.... anyway loved your post and just wanted to say, speaking of metal, i have been using rusy iron nails in some of my pieces and it is a great effect. I also like to use hinges as bird legs....i will psot you some pics if you are interested and i can figure this machine out hehehe. take care adios Trina



#49 metal and mud

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 02:50 PM



Hello new friends--

This is my first post and I know it won't be my last because, reading the other posts, I realize I have been hooked, line and sinker and all, into clay. I just turned 60 (and didn't enjoy it). I live in the desert of Southern New Mexico. I'm a baby doctor by day, a full-time potter in my dreams. I'd always wanted to try clay, with the intent to make myself a set of stoneware dishes. My adult son, who learned to throw porcelain while in college, found an octagonal electric Paragon kiln for $100 and brought it to me. This was a year ago. I got it set up in my garage and decided to give home made pie dishes for Christmas last year. I made so many mistakes in both creating pieces and glazing them that it's pretty funny. Luckily my loved ones indulge me.

Since then I've taken classes at Ceramics Plus of New Mexico and have learned the basics. I entered some pieces in our regional State Fair this fall and won a blue ribbon for a vase that I put metal pieces on--hence my name metal and mud. My son makes the metal pieces; we etch them with salt and hydrogen peroxide. I'm envisioning tumblers that feature an etched strip of metal. I decided to sell my pieces (I can't keep them all!!) and actually sold a clay basket last weekend. I start selling at our Farmer's Market on the 17th. I hand build only and love to put texture in my pieces, and glaze them nice colors. I'm saving for a wheel and look forward to that. Sorry this was so long-winded, but now you know the most important things about me!


I hoe you get this message, potter but totally computer illiterate.... anyway loved your post and just wanted to say, speaking of metal, i have been using rusy iron nails in some of my pieces and it is a great effect. I also like to use hinges as bird legs....i will psot you some pics if you are interested and i can figure this machine out hehehe. take care adios Trina



#50 metal and mud

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 02:51 PM

Hi Trina--I hope I'm replying to you and not myself!! The term newbie is so accurate. . . I'm very interested in your use of iron nails and I'd love to see a picture!

#51 trina

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Posted 10 December 2011 - 10:55 AM

[quote name='metal and mud' date='09 December 2011 - 02:51 PM' timestamp='1323460309' post='10892']
Hi Trina--I hope I'm replying to you and not myself!! The term newbie is so Argg...lets see if this works, it is a little hard to figure this reply thing out. Firstly nice to hear back I agree newbie is a silly word... oh well. I am goin to atempt to post some pictures now!

#52 trina

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Posted 10 December 2011 - 12:36 PM

[attachment=559:BILD1010.JPG][attachment=558:BILD1037.JPG][quote name='trina' date='10 December 2011 - 10:55 AM' timestamp='1323532541' post='10912']
[quote name='metal and mud' date='09 December 2011 - 02:51 PM' timestamp='1323460309' post='10892']
Hi Trina--I hope I'm replying to you and not myself!! The term newbie is so Argg...lets see if this works, it is a little hard to figure this reply thing out. Firstly nice to hear back I agree newbie is a silly word... oh well. I am goin to atempt to post some pictures now!
[/quote]

[attachment=557:BILD1034.JPG]

#53 midnight_potter

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Posted 18 December 2011 - 03:25 PM

Being brand new to the forum I thought I would take a minute to introduce myself, I hope its ok to post this here.

I am 35, live here in Ohio and got into pottery last year after doing a small workshop. I fell in love and soon had a brand new wheel. The workshop I took helped me with the basics and I couldnt tell you how many hours I have spent surfing the internet for articles or watching youtube videos. So far I have only worked in high fire stonewares and made functional pieces. I have made everything I have wanted to so far after a lot of reading, research and videos but of course I still find things on a regular basis that I want to try.

For me it is a hobby, passion and I must admit even an obsession! I find myself throwing pottery for long hours at a time and even day after day then I get burned out, concentrate on other stuff and come back to it when I am ready, even when I am taking a few days off though I am thinking about what I am going to throw next!

I would love to hear from others, how you got into this, if you do it for fun or do it for a living if you throw more functional or decorative pieces etc. anything! I want to hear it Posted Image



Hi Buckeye, I just joined today and have not uploaded a picture yet - but I thought I would give some introductory comments. I am an older person who has done pottery all my life as a profession and an art. I fell in love with passion to put it mildly and never looked back so it is almost 35 years now. In 2005 things began to fall apart and I could no longer make a living at shows or wholesale so after a brief while (I had to do something) I went back to school for mental health counseling preparing myself for art therapy.It has been a long hard road mingled with anguish over the loss of what I thought I would do forever. I continued to do a few shows as I could muster the booth fees - but the sales have never really come back. In total most clay sales pitched dramatically for most of my friends. A few remain out there who are a couple, I found, as the other can bring in income through another job. A person alone has an awful time making all the ends meet. I do not blame this on the enonomy, but rather on the endless imports so cheap and hard to resist for most people. We were not protected by tariffs as other countries do to safeguard their local artists. From some points of view I feel cheated in that way. But also the handmade movement flowed its course and there is nothing mysterious anymore and much of the public don't care. So out there if you see a wonderful pot from a potter who has been around for a while - buy it - because likely their pottery will close or go on half time. I have made all sorts of pottery - a lot of it functional - but have experimented with all kinds of stuff as well. We lived in South and East Africa for 12 years at one point so I have travelled and pioneered and spent much time in the UK as well. At one time I went to conferences anywhere I could afford. I miss that life but am thankful I was part of it for such a long time. I have experience, so please use my knowledge and ask questions as teaching is also not the option I thought it would be unless I do it for free. I live in North Florida now having abandoned my studio in upstate New York and am almost finished my Masters getting ready to begin internship in the summer. I may have met soime of you out there already in my travels. Hope you all have a happy next couple of weeks before the start of 2012.

#54 buckeye

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Posted 18 December 2011 - 08:23 PM


Being brand new to the forum I thought I would take a minute to introduce myself, I hope its ok to post this here.

I am 35, live here in Ohio and got into pottery last year after doing a small workshop. I fell in love and soon had a brand new wheel. The workshop I took helped me with the basics and I couldnt tell you how many hours I have spent surfing the internet for articles or watching youtube videos. So far I have only worked in high fire stonewares and made functional pieces. I have made everything I have wanted to so far after a lot of reading, research and videos but of course I still find things on a regular basis that I want to try.

For me it is a hobby, passion and I must admit even an obsession! I find myself throwing pottery for long hours at a time and even day after day then I get burned out, concentrate on other stuff and come back to it when I am ready, even when I am taking a few days off though I am thinking about what I am going to throw next!

I would love to hear from others, how you got into this, if you do it for fun or do it for a living if you throw more functional or decorative pieces etc. anything! I want to hear it Posted Image



Hi Buckeye, I just joined today and have not uploaded a picture yet - but I thought I would give some introductory comments. I am an older person who has done pottery all my life as a profession and an art. I fell in love with passion to put it mildly and never looked back so it is almost 35 years now. In 2005 things began to fall apart and I could no longer make a living at shows or wholesale so after a brief while (I had to do something) I went back to school for mental health counseling preparing myself for art therapy.It has been a long hard road mingled with anguish over the loss of what I thought I would do forever. I continued to do a few shows as I could muster the booth fees - but the sales have never really come back. In total most clay sales pitched dramatically for most of my friends. A few remain out there who are a couple, I found, as the other can bring in income through another job. A person alone has an awful time making all the ends meet. I do not blame this on the enonomy, but rather on the endless imports so cheap and hard to resist for most people. We were not protected by tariffs as other countries do to safeguard their local artists. From some points of view I feel cheated in that way. But also the handmade movement flowed its course and there is nothing mysterious anymore and much of the public don't care. So out there if you see a wonderful pot from a potter who has been around for a while - buy it - because likely their pottery will close or go on half time. I have made all sorts of pottery - a lot of it functional - but have experimented with all kinds of stuff as well. We lived in South and East Africa for 12 years at one point so I have travelled and pioneered and spent much time in the UK as well. At one time I went to conferences anywhere I could afford. I miss that life but am thankful I was part of it for such a long time. I have experience, so please use my knowledge and ask questions as teaching is also not the option I thought it would be unless I do it for free. I live in North Florida now having abandoned my studio in upstate New York and am almost finished my Masters getting ready to begin internship in the summer. I may have met soime of you out there already in my travels. Hope you all have a happy next couple of weeks before the start of 2012.



Glad to see you respond and so many others! Sorry to hear that you had to get out of it. I am really looking forward to seeing your posts and being able to feed off your wisdom!

#55 teardrop

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 12:54 PM

Thanks to those responsible for this forum. It's always great to find a community of like-minded folks!

My wife and I are new to pottery and took our first non-credit class this past Summer @ a local college studio (as a therapy of sorts). Our 18 yr old also joined us for the summer class. We have since taken the Fall semester class (which was an int/advanced studio workshop) and just a few days ago...signed up for the Spring semester as well. (a Functional Sculpture/open studio class) Classes are one night a week (Wed) but we have use of the studio M/TuesPM/Th/F/S. The studio has 2 electric kilns and a large gas fired kiln outside that fire as needed. There is also a soda fire kiln but it doesn't appear anyone knows how to fire it/etc. Hopefully they will get it together and we will see it operate sometime before the Spring classes end.....but all-in-all we have quite a bit of equipment/etc available to learn on....and learn we are....

A bit of preface. I don't want to interject sadness into this forum.....but I also don't want to leave out the "why" of all of this....

We are both 53 and have been married for 30 years. Last Spring we lost our 21 year old in an accident and that tossed us into a surreal landscape of grief and anguish... We had signed up for the Summer pottery class before he passed...and while we didn't truly have the drive to create @ the time....we went ahead and started the sessions in June as a way to build upon our strength as a family unit of 3.

Neither of us (olders) had thrown on a wheel prior to these classes. Our son had a bit of exposure in high school Art class but it was minimal.

Most of the Summer was focused on familiarizing ourselves with the wheel and yes...with filling the recycle tubs full of spent/destroyed clay. I was able to make bowls the first night that i was proud of at the time..but you know how that goes..... I look at them now and they are so small/crude it's funny. Most have been shuffled off to relatives who are amazed we can do this at all....

Hopefully we can keep them interested in our creations. These flat-rate Postal boxes sure have come in handy...lemme tell ya. >>WE<< sure don't need all this stuff hangin' about! LOL.

I'm still a real hack on the wheel (IMO)....though I have been able to make a few nice bowls/etc along the way. However, one day I started to take notice of the clay-art/slab-construction others were also doing in the studio....and one night in class.....instead of wedging...I rolled out some nice slabs of clay and started playing with that.

BAM. HOOKED. The wheel was fun....but it was also very frustrating @ times. The slabs were a different story.....more therapeutic....more 3-d....more possibilities >outside< the shape of round.

The wheel also anchored me to the studio...whereas I found out that the slabs allowed me to work on (functional) creations a home as well. Can you tell where this is going? LOL.

We've since deemed all of this "OCD"... OBSSESSIVE CLAY DISORDER... After reading through the intro's here....I'm thinkin' many of you can relate to this designation!

Bottom line...I always wanted to try pottery and now I am incredibly hooked. My wife has the same fervor, but alas, someone has to bring home the dinero and she still does the work thing so she devotes less time to the craft than I do.....thus...the shelf always seems to be full of my latest creations/bent/focus....

I'm seriously giving thought to buying a kiln for the garage and taking this a bit farther...not into a business per se'....but to find a few decent outlets where I can possibly move a peice here and there and take advantage of the "resort" aspect this area (Colorado Ski country) has to offer and be able to continue on without my home appearing on the nexy episode of "Hoarders- Ceramics addictions revealed".

Seriously though....it brings me joy/solace/focus.....and the vacation from my thoughts is a priceless entity @ this time in my (our) lives.

Thanks for reading along. I look forward to tapping the knowledge-base here and sharing (learning) whatever I can

be well!





Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind. Dr. Seuss US author & illustrator (1904 - 1991)

#56 Chris Campbell

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 01:30 PM

Thanks for sharing teardrop ... I am so sorry for your loss, but so uplifted by your family's choice to bond together. So many times grief drives people apart. Thanks for trusting us with your story and I wish you all a long and interesting creative journey. :D

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#57 trina

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 02:30 PM

Thanks to those responsible for this forum. It's always great to find a community of like-minded folks!

My wife and I are new to pottery and took our first non-credit class this past Summer @ a local college studio (as a therapy of sorts). Our 18 yr old also joined us for the summer class. We have since taken the Fall semester class (which was an int/advanced studio workshop) and just a few days ago...signed up for the Spring semester as well. (a Functional Sculpture/open studio class) Classes are one night a week (Wed) but we have use of the studio M/TuesPM/Th/F/S. The studio has 2 electric kilns and a large gas fired kiln outside that fire as needed. There is also a soda fire kiln but it doesn't appear anyone knows how to fire it/etc. Hopefully they will get it together and we will see it operate sometime before the Spring classes end.....but all-in-all we have quite a bit of equipment/etc available to learn on....and learn we are....

A bit of preface. I don't want to interject sadness into this forum.....but I also don't want to leave out the "why" of all of this....

We are both 53 and have been married for 30 years. Last Spring we lost our 21 year old in an accident and that tossed us into a surreal landscape of grief and anguish... We had signed up for the Summer pottery class before he passed...and while we didn't truly have the drive to create @ the time....we went ahead and started the sessions in June as a way to build upon our strength as a family unit of 3.

Neither of us (olders) had thrown on a wheel prior to these classes. Our son had a bit of exposure in high school Art class but it was minimal.

Most of the Summer was focused on familiarizing ourselves with the wheel and yes...with filling the recycle tubs full of spent/destroyed clay. I was able to make bowls the first night that i was proud of at the time..but you know how that goes..... I look at them now and they are so small/crude it's funny. Most have been shuffled off to relatives who are amazed we can do this at all....

Hopefully we can keep them interested in our creations. These flat-rate Postal boxes sure have come in handy...lemme tell ya. >>WE<< sure don't need all this stuff hangin' about! LOL.

I'm still a real hack on the wheel (IMO)....though I have been able to make a few nice bowls/etc along the way. However, one day I started to take notice of the clay-art/slab-construction others were also doing in the studio....and one night in class.....instead of wedging...I rolled out some nice slabs of clay and started playing with that.

BAM. HOOKED. The wheel was fun....but it was also very frustrating @ times. The slabs were a different story.....more therapeutic....more 3-d....more possibilities >outside< the shape of round.

The wheel also anchored me to the studio...whereas I found out that the slabs allowed me to work on (functional) creations a home as well. Can you tell where this is going? LOL.

We've since deemed all of this "OCD"... OBSSESSIVE CLAY DISORDER... After reading through the intro's here....I'm thinkin' many of you can relate to this designation!

Bottom line...I always wanted to try pottery and now I am incredibly hooked. My wife has the same fervor, but alas, someone has to bring home the dinero and she still does the work thing so she devotes less time to the craft than I do.....thus...the shelf always seems to be full of my latest creations/bent/focus....

I'm seriously giving thought to buying a kiln for the garage and taking this a bit farther...not into a business per se'....but to find a few decent outlets where I can possibly move a peice here and there and take advantage of the "resort" aspect this area (Colorado Ski country) has to offer and be able to continue on without my home appearing on the nexy episode of "Hoarders- Ceramics addictions revealed".

Seriously though....it brings me joy/solace/focus.....and the vacation from my thoughts is a priceless entity @ this time in my (our) lives.

Thanks for reading along. I look forward to tapping the knowledge-base here and sharing (learning) whatever I can

be well!



#58 trina

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 02:42 PM

Hi TearDrop,
Nice to have you on the site. I am sorry about the loss of your child, glad though that you have found an interest in pottery, becareful you will be buying a kiln before long! Look forward to your future posts. Trina

#59 metal and mud

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 02:47 PM

[quote name='trina' date='10 December 2011 - 10:36 AM' timestamp='1323538588' post='10914']
[attachment=559:BILD1010.JPG][attachment=558:BILD1037.JPG][quote name='trina' date='10 December 2011 - 10:55 AM' timestamp='1323532541' post='10912']
[quote name='metal and mud' date='09 December 2011 - 02:51 PM' timestamp='1323460309' post='10892']
Hi Trina--I hope I'm replying to you and not myself!! The term newbie is so Argg...lets see if this works, it is a little hard to figure this reply thing out. Firstly nice to hear back I agree newbie is a silly word... oh well. I am goin to atempt to post some pictures now!
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Hi Trina--Sorry I didn't reply sooner, but I didn't check the post. A week has gone by, plus. I love your birds with nail legs!! They are so whimsical. The mosaic of the lily pads and fishes is very nice--how big is it? I have a similar project planned, one with large tiles carved to feature ginkgo leaves. I did a test plate and I like the way it turned out; haven't started to tackle something like your mosaic, or mural, or whatever it's called. Any pointers for me or others who would like to make a work like that? FYI, I took my pieces to our local Farmer's Market last Saturday and sold two little (2 inch) clay boxes. Only $20 in revenue, but it made me happy that someone liked my pieces enought to buy them. It also fueled my desire to go back. It's the Christmas Eve market this Saturday.

#60 PotsbyChar

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 07:03 PM

Being brand new to the forum I thought I would take a minute to introduce myself, I hope its ok to post this here.

I am 35, live here in Ohio and got into pottery last year after doing a small workshop. I fell in love and soon had a brand new wheel. The workshop I took helped me with the basics and I couldnt tell you how many hours I have spent surfing the internet for articles or watching youtube videos. So far I have only worked in high fire stonewares and made functional pieces. I have made everything I have wanted to so far after a lot of reading, research and videos but of course I still find things on a regular basis that I want to try.

For me it is a hobby, passion and I must admit even an obsession! I find myself throwing pottery for long hours at a time and even day after day then I get burned out, concentrate on other stuff and come back to it when I am ready, even when I am taking a few days off though I am thinking about what I am going to throw next!

I would love to hear from others, how you got into this, if you do it for fun or do it for a living if you throw more functional or decorative pieces etc. anything! I want to hear it Posted Image


Hi Buckeye, my name is Charlotte and I am 68 years young. I began my journey with clay a year and a half ago when I took a ceramics class at Texas A&M University-Commerce as part of my curriculum for my BFA. Midway through the class I was so in love with clay that I switched my major focus from painting to ceramics and I have not looked back since. I am very fortunate to be studying under renowned ceramist, Barbara Frey. I love throwing on the wheel, hand-building and sculpting in clay. I have been fortunate to be able to attend the last 2 NCECA conferences and am looking forward to attending my third in Seattle this Spring. If you have the opportunity to attend I highly recommend the experience. When I graduate in May 2013 I plan on opening a small studio at my home in SE Oklahoma.

Charlotte
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