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Oddisgood

Novice Here, New To Forum - A Question About Slip

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Hello, and apologies for such a basic question. I'm just starting out and trying some handbuilding at home before my next lesson next week. I painted a piece with black slip, a commercial slip straight from the pot (from potclays) last week, and it was very thick to brush with. I am wondering if I can dilute it or will tht cause problems with it 'fitting' the clay body?

thanks, Linda

(Also I have saved my profile pic to correct size but site still doesn't upload it?)

 

 

 

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Profile picture: The avatar/profile picture function is sort of broken. Members have been successful by first uploading the image to the gallery and then finding the options drop down menu and selecting 'set as photo'.

 

Black slip: Was the slip made from a black clay body or clay body colored with black stain or was it a casting slip? For best fit, you will want a slip that shrinks at/near the same rate as your clay body. Most folks will take some of their clay and slake it down into a liquid consistency and add a colored stain. That eliminates the potential for not fitting the underlying clay body. The only black slip I saw on the Potclays website was for a casting slip; those generally are formulated a bit different than clay bodies. You should be able to dilute the slip to make it more brushable.

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Welcome to the forum!

 

you need to put the jpg in your gallery at the right size. Then under options, Use as avatar.

as for the first question, not sure I understand. you used the slip straight from the pot. Does this mean from wet clay from which the pice was made? Or did you mean straight from a commercial jar? 

You can dilute both, but don't go too thin or you may get washed out or streaky results.

 

 

Marcia

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Thanks Bruce, and Marcia. I tried to click 'like' on the posts but apparently I've exceeded my quota of liking posts today!

The slip is this:

 

"161-2271 Black Decorating Slip (Engobe).

Colour becomes richer as temperature increases and when glazed.
Recommended firing range 1050-1280C
 
Linda

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I think you can thin it down without a problem.  If it fit when thick, it will fit when thin.  If you are concerned about coverage (per Marcia's post above) you can paint on more than one layer of the slip.

 

A lot of this stuff, you just have to try and see.  Experimentation is on the menu daily for most potters.

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 I am wondering if I can dilute it or will tht cause problems with it 'fitting' the clay body?

 

 

Hi Linda, welcome from another UK member.

 

You will very soon find there are two "stock" answers to every question:  

 

1) test, test, test (try it 'coz we don't know the answer, but let us know)

 

and

 

2) more details required.

 

Never let these answers put you off.  I think we all get better answers here than asking the same question on some of the many FB clay groups.

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Hi, Linda!

I've used some engobes and to the best of my knowledge, they are really somewhere between a slip and an underglaze, so they can be applied either before or after bisque firing. They will need a coat of clear glaze if you want the final product to be glossy. 

I think it's likely that you can safely thin it a little bit so that it's easier to use. If this is a work-intensive piece I would definitely do some testing before you commit to it, though. 

 

One thing I've found is that it's best to apply several thin coats of engobe than one thick one; thick coats of engobe have a tendency to clump and crack in the final firing, like dried mud. It's not a huge deal and it doesn't affect the integrity of the pot, but I don't like how it looks. 

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Guest JBaymore

Chilly, there are really three stock answers.  The third one is:

 

drum roll please

 

3.  It depends.

 

 

Ah yes........ my mantra.  ;)

 

best,

 

...............john

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Chilly, there are really three stock answers.  The third one is:

 

drum roll please

 

3.  It depends.

 

Drat.  I knew there was another one, just couldn't think of it.

 

So, it depends if you give us more details and test it.   :)

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Hi Linda,

 

I have just been out to the garage to check on my potclays decorating slips. The mid-blue that I use a lot is quite thick(double cream-ish) but did thin down slightly after a really good stir. I opened a brand new tub of yellow ochre and that was very thin, a milky consistency. The white slip that hasn't been used for a while was just solid lumps!

 

I prefer the thicker slip as I print on my clay and it sticks to my woodblocks, creating a clearer image.....the watery slip looks a bit washed out. It depends on the effect you want to create.

 

I'll be adding water to my white slip in an attempt to reconstitute it, but I am expecting the colour to be watered down too. Your black probably won't be as black if you water it down, but you may prefer that for the effect you are trying to produce.

 

I've used Potclays slip without problems on porcelain and stoneware clay and been pleased with the colour under a clear glaze. I generally don't cover the whole pot with slip tho'.

 

Try it and see......don't dilute the whole pot tho', just in case!

Let us know how you get on.

 

Sally

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