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extragiraffe

Trimming Mugs/bowls Without The Wheel

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Does anyone have experience or have tried trimming pieces without the wheel and creating a foot? I am taking a class but can't get the studio more than once a week. I want to take the mugs that I just threw home so I can manage the moisture and trim/add handles. I don't have a wheel at my house is there an effective technique for trimming off the wheel that I could employ?

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There is an a technique used in China, Japan and Korea that you might be able to use. 

 

 

 

This may be what you are looking for, but searches of utube or other sources may give you quite a few things to think about.  John Baymore knows much more about this than I, and will probably chime in as time allows.

 

 

best,

Pres

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@Denice That's a good idea, but if I am going to purchase a wheel, at a minimum I will by the Speedball Artista so I can throw a descent piece as well
 

@Pres & @Joseph  Thanks for the links!  I like the nature of it I might just dress it up a little since for the first go around because I want to do some fine line sgraffito work at home with the pieces too (haven't tried that yet either so I am really just playing around).  The other option I considered is trying to create a foot out of another shape like an octagon or pentagon and just seeing how that would flow into the pieces.  I will try and show what comes of this.  I am pretty new to a lot of pottery techniques but I am loving the potential.


 

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Guest JBaymore

Or if you don't want to get a "formal" banding wheel (well worth having), get a "Lazy Susan" (apologies to all the Susans out there).

 

I trim a large portion of my Chawan without a wheel.  The foot needs to complement and harmonize with the rest of the form .... so that fits the more asymmetrical pieces.  Depending on your forms... that might be a possibility.  Protect the rims a bit on a piece of foam... and just carve a foot.

 

However if you look at Japanese style aka Raku and kuro Raku Chawan..... you'll notice that the foot ring on most is pretty "symmetrical" and looks like it was done "on a wheel".  When I do those kinds of pieces, I also do not use a typical wheel.  It is done on a banding wheel.... very slow rotation (not trying to "spin" the banding wheel as if it were a regular wheel).  Decisive cuts... couple of slow rotations.

 

best,

 

..................john

 

PS:  Buying a banding wheel.... SHIMPO!  Worth the money.  (Second choice...... Lockerbie.)

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I don't do this anymore, but for a long time, I didn't trim my mugs.  A lot of potters will just undercut the mug at the end of throwing, so that there is a nice deep bevel at the bottom.  Then, after the mug has stiffened up a bit, they will just run their thumb around the base to smooth the ragged edge left by the tool used to form the undercut, or use a sponge to smooth it.  I would guess that a majority of production potters use this or a similar technique to finish mug bottoms.

 

When I was a production potter, I took this a step further, and using a sharp knife, I would cut 8 facets into the base bevel, which reduced the weight of the piece a little, and gave it both a visual lift, and an interesting tactile quality when held in the palm of the hand.

 

When I finally got a Giffen Grip, I started trimming nice foot rings into my mugs, but it really isn't necessary.

 

You can sort of see the faceting on this ancient mug:

 

 

post-65900-0-84947200-1449773069_thumb.jpg

post-65900-0-84947200-1449773069_thumb.jpg

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Biggest and most important piece of advice if you are trimming without a wheel: do not, do not try to trim it the same way as with a wheel. Get a lazy susan, center it, carefully mark off the centered foot circle and inner ring, carve and cut it away with various tools, but don't try to spin it quickly while cutting if it's not attached and I mean firmly. Horrible results, I ruined some stuff before I got a clue. Also if something is not going to be "perfect", go with the imperfection like in the video Joseph shared. Better to have a pot that is crazy and carved and wonky all round than a just slightly lopsided pot. When it's all that way it looks more deliberate.

 

That's my advice anyway. :)

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There is an a technique used in China, Japan and Korea that you might be able to use. 

 

 

 

This may be what you are looking for, but searches of utube or other sources may give you quite a few things to think about.  John Baymore knows much more about this than I, and will probably chime in as time allows.

 

 

best,

Pres

I admire those of you that has patience enough to do products on the wheel, for myself making me mold is much easier. See what my molds can produce.

 

https://goo.gl/photos/yVoZaCqgZ2kVhx7H9

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Foot rings are problematic for ware that is used in the dishwasher. Ever notice how unloading some pieces leaves everything below wet unless you are more careful than I. One of the reasons I have started to split foot rings on bowls and plates to allow drainage.

 

best,

Pres

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