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Throwing Plates, Different Way?

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I have seen the way most people throw a plate. Is there a reason why you can not throw a flat disk and then tilt up the edge to form the plate? It would not be difficult to run a tool under the edge to form the raised edge. 

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There are a lot of professional potters that make flat disk with a lip for a plate. 

 

I like this potter's work a lot. Very minimalist https://www.instagram.com/humbleceramics/

 

This person throws flat disk and just brings the edge up. Or atleast the final shape looks that way.

 

I plan on making my plates in a very similar fashion coming up for my home to eat off of.

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This is an especially great technique for beginners classes...not as much skill required.  You don't even need to center the clay....just flatten and cut off the outer edge before lifting it.  Not real useful for teaching skills, but in a 6 wk adult class with folks who aren't likely to continue in clay, it's the easiest way for them to get a reasonable finished piece that they made all by themselves.  Of course, we aren't doing dinner plates, just small saucers.

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This is an especially great technique for beginners classes...not as much skill required.  You don't even need to center the clay....just flatten and cut off the outer edge before lifting it.  Not real useful for teaching skills, but in a 6 wk adult class with folks who aren't likely to continue in clay, it's the easiest way for them to get a reasonable finished piece that they made all by themselves.  Of course, we aren't doing dinner plates, just small saucers.

 

Hmmm this is very interesting. I will keep this in mind if anybody REALLY wants to make something their first time coming over to play in my studio. :) Which, everybody always does. 

Mari and flowerdry like this

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To answer the original post... Yes, of course there are reasons to make a plate with a larger amount of clay, centered, have the edge pulled and then laid down, turned over and trimmed.

 

One would be getting a proper foot on the plate.

Another is the shape of the gallery. A flat sheet with an edge folded up to make the gallery would "remember" the downward position and tend to curl downward.

 

So the reasons are almost all aesthetic. A perfectly nice plate can be made your way as long as the edge is simple enough.

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I thrown plates both ways, and prefer pulling a rim as opposed to just

raising one. Pulling a rim seems more personal. I think there are more

options when pulling a rim. I rarely throw any kind of plate, simply

because they take up so much floor space in a kiln. But I will demonstrate

throwing a plate both ways before reclaiming the clay to make mugs with. :)

 

See ya,

Alabama

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I like a more defined lip on a plate than one that is just raised as in above photo on Chilly's post.

These wider lips need to be thrown as they will sag at least at high temps if not made right with a curve.

I agree a plate rim is personal and takes time to master..

My dinner set I use every day was thrown in 1975 and they are still like that today-I just sold the same type dinnerware set  I have always produced (13 place settings) last Friday.

The lips are wide and raised. Most commercial ware has that this barely raised lip.

Mark

Here was the set last week-its in another state being used everyday now.You can see the wider lips.

 

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Jo-Ann, Crusty and Bunnybaer like this

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My parent's plates have a really wide rim, making the food area smaller.  Great if you're on a diet.  I love my plates, but also like those with a narrower rim too.

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My plates always have a nice foot and the bottoms are glazed-you need extra clay to get this done  right at least 5.5 #s. I use a nubbin in center to keep any souping from happening-its also where I sign my work-I do this with larger forms as well. Its a thing I have done since the early 70's.

Here is the bottom of another set sold awhile back.

Mark

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My plates always have a nice foot and the bottoms are glazed-you need extra clay to get this done  right at least 5.5 #s. I use a nubbin in center to keep any souping from happening-its also where I sign my work-I do this with larger forms as well. Its a thing I have done since the early 70's.

Here is the bottom of anther set sold awhile back.

Mark

 

I have a vintage set of slip molds and I have had some slight slumping in the very center because of the unsupported weight. So on larger pieces I now do this as well to support the center. Glad to know I'm not just weird!! ;) So far have not had any of this kind of slumping on anything I throw. Still trying to figure out how to add this onto the slip cast pieces, though. 

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Still trying to figure out how to add this onto the slip cast pieces, though. 

 

 

If you carve into your mould you will get extra clay in your cast piece.  This is a much easier alteration to make than having less clay in your casting.

 

If you don't want to risk the original mould, you can make a new bottom for the mould and then alter that.

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If you don't want to risk the original mould, you can make a new bottom for the mould and then alter that.

 

 

I would second that.

 

Looking at a largish industrial plate, you might consider a second inner footring rather than

a central nubbin. Besides giving better support, this might also avoid problems with a central

pour/drain hole.

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This will be the first time that I'm firing plates in my own kiln. They are a similar style that Chilly pictured above, flat with turned up edges. They are made out of ^6 porcelain and this will be a bisque firing. Can I just place them on the shelves or do they need to be on stilts? I'm worried about warping. Thanks.

 

Paul

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Still trying to figure out how to add this onto the slip cast pieces, though. 

 

 

If you carve into your mould you will get extra clay in your cast piece.  This is a much easier alteration to make than having less clay in your casting.

 

If you don't want to risk the original mould, you can make a new bottom for the mould and then alter that.

 

 

This is an "upside down" mold and the bottom has no piece, it's open to the air. You drain the extra slip off and let it set until you can take the mold apart. 

 

I'm probably going to give the pie plate mold to my dad since I can now make pie plates on the wheel and the mold I have is a nightmare to get the plate off, it suctions on and it's easy to ruin the pie plate taking it off. 

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I threw 22 plates with raising the rim. the rims stay well with the firing to 6^. 

I trim a shallow foot  as well as a ring in the middle for support. There is just enough foot to allow clear glaze on the bottom, fortunately the clear glaze does not creep and stick on the shelves.

  I will have to teach my wife to get pics without the glare in them.

 

 

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Jo-Ann and GiselleNo5 like this

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I'm probably going to give the pie plate mold to my dad since I can now make pie plates on the wheel and the mold I have is a nightmare to get the plate off, it suctions on and it's easy to ruin the pie plate taking it off. 

 

 

 

Sounds like the best option - lol.  Although we could probably find a slip-casting solution if you really needed one.

GiselleNo5 likes this

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I'm probably going to give the pie plate mold to my dad since I can now make pie plates on the wheel and the mold I have is a nightmare to get the plate off, it suctions on and it's easy to ruin the pie plate taking it off. 

 

 

 

Sounds like the best option - lol.  Although we could probably find a slip-casting solution if you really needed one.

 

 

Oh, a solution would be great anyway, that way I'm not passing on a problem. I'll post photos of the mold. I thought about drilling a little relief hole in the thickest part but not sure if that would even help! 

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