Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
rayaldridge

Do You Date Your Work?

Recommended Posts

I've always added the year that a piece was made to my signature, which helps me to remember when I made the stuff I've kept.  But I've wondered if this is a good idea or a bad one, from the viewpoint of collectors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

we discussed this last year (?) and the reasons not to date work seemed to outweigh any reasons to do so.  what happens when something doesn't sell until 2 years go by?  do not know any serious collectors, that is WAY above my pay grade.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every time. I can always check the date and check my progress

and skill. Sometimes I see something I made a long time ago, and

ask myself,"was this a hold my beer and watch me throw pottery moment?"

A dated vessel will sometimes keep you humble! And dates shows how you've

changed, and improved ever so slightly.

 

I sign each vessel at the top of the foot ring, the cone temp goes in the middle left of the ring, the weight it took to make the vessel goes on the other side, (right middle), and other pertinent information goes on the lower part of the foot ring. Once the vessel is sold no one will know anything about the vessel, so that's why I go thru the trouble. This might only work for me.

 

As for the native pottery they are signed and dated on the inside and covered with mud after they're fired.

See ya,

Alabama

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have always dated my work with the year after my signature. I have some pieces at home dated from junior high school in 1963 and from adult continuing education classes in 1973-4.

 

Paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could do your own version of the diamond makers mark used in the 1800's, maybe your signature/chop in the middle then a code for the year and series or whatever you are keeping track of, it would be dated but in code. This type of thing http://pottery-english.com/pottery-marks-patent-office-registration-marks-and-numbers/   If you make the type of work that collectors or historians are likely to pursue then I would imagine that by being able to date the item would add to its provenance in years to come. My work doesn't fall into that catagory so nope, I don't date it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don’t add years to my work pieces..for me why add year..thebest insurance is the  moment and the whole process involved rejoiced me…that has gone so why mark year and spoil.

 

 

 

 

Vinks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So far, I have had 3 different signatures in my pottery life.  The first change was due to a name change, the second because I decided my initials needed a little more flair.  I've used the last style for about the last 5 years and have lately been thinking of switching to a stamp.  The added benefit of this switch is to somewhat date my pieces.  That way I would know whether a piece was from my prehistoric period, mid-century, contemporary, or modern!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some work I have dated, but most I don't.  

 

Usually I'll date it, if it's a gift piece, with a memorable date.  Otherwise I tend not to date them.  

 

As I don't sell my work, it's not an issue of customers not wanting older stock.  But I definitely understand why potters wouldn't want to date them for that reason.  People at the grocery stores dig to the back for the newest milk.  I have no doubt, there are similar types at Arts/ Crafts shows.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I update my chop mark every year. It doesn't include a year visibly but if someone was particularly keen in my work they might be able to figure out the year.

 

There is also a bit of fuzziness in the process. Pieces made today might be finished next year. Or the year after...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to just sign everything. However, over the years, I have tried to remember when I changed from one sort of decoration or form to another. Lately I have been exploring a whole new range of more off centered pieces with more texture and less of the stenciled and painted decoration. I have come to realize that the timing on my work showing the progression over the years is important to me. So I am signing everything with the date included. This will allow the next 10 to twenty years to find their place in time. Too bad the first 30 years is not the same.

 

Best,

Pres

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am making stuff just for me right now, so I sign it (if I give it away) , date it so I can tell where I was in the process, abbreviate the clay, because I am still experimenting w different clays, and what cone to fire to, cuz i am just getting ready to glaze fire a bit next week. This is for me. 

recently I have been finding nice hand made in second hand shops- these potters are either not from around here or they aren't here any more. Two pieces that i really like, they are signed and dated and that makes me happy.

With every thing handmade out of the rest of the world, too expensive and no signature, I would like it if everyone signed and dated everything. 

                   Jolie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I started making pottery I was signing and dating it. Sometimes with just the year, other times with both month and year. For me I think this was due to not having any care or thought as to how others would feel about when the piece was made. Of course, being new I wasn't looking towards selling any work at that time. I happen to agree with those who don't date their work because some people don't want to buy "old" work. As if it was some expiration date and the work is going to go bad.

 

My work IS dated however in code. Stamped with my chop, hand written code. Only I know when it was made due to the code on the piece. I use this for myself in the same way some have mentioned, to examine my growth or any other changes I've made. If my work ever becomes "valued collectibles" (sheesh! Wouldn't that be nice!) I would release the key to decipher the code although I don't think it's that difficult of a coding system to break.

 

Paul Nicholas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.