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roselle

Could Someone Help A Mama?

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Do you get to travel much? Kentucky Mudworks is in Lexington KY. They sell wheels, kilns etc. Ordered some glaze from them awhile back.

HAHAHA!  A Honda Fit and 4 kids...That's a no!  I wish though. I'll see if they are online.  Thanks!

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Go with the Thomas Stuart wheel. You can't beat the large splash pan, plus TS/Skutt has good customer service. My bearing went out on my wheel, it was knocking like crazy. I called in and it was still under warranty, they sent me a new bearing at no cost. 

 

I clean my splash pan like once a month. It holds a massive amount of trimmings and slop. I would never go back to those little circle pans like i started with when I went to some local classes. Taking them off with clay and water in them, I always made a mess.

TS has two wheels, almost exactly the same. I think the only difference is that the pan is removable on one and not on the other. How do you clean the pan, if it isn't removable?

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As a compromise you might start out with polymer clay. your son can make only smaller things with it but he might enjoy the feel of working it and it is solidified in your home oven.  comes in many colors.  Rakuku

I bought him some air dry clay and he has something drying in my dehydrator as I type this. Thanks!  I think polymer clay would be a good idea!

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Go with the Thomas Stuart wheel. You can't beat the large splash pan, plus TS/Skutt has good customer service. My bearing went out on my wheel, it was knocking like crazy. I called in and it was still under warranty, they sent me a new bearing at no cost. 

 

I clean my splash pan like once a month. It holds a massive amount of trimmings and slop. I would never go back to those little circle pans like i started with when I went to some local classes. Taking them off with clay and water in them, I always made a mess.

 

TS has two wheels, almost exactly the same. I think the only difference is that the pan is removable on one and not on the other. How do you clean the pan, if it isn't removable?

You sponge it out. I'd recommend a drywall sponge cut in half.

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Think I have that Thomas Stuart 1hp Professional. It is a very nice wheel. Plan on it lasting me a life-time.

Right now I am leaning towards the same. Will have to decide soon, so it will be under the tree in time!  Thanks!

 

 

The 1 hp Thomas Stuart model is probably more wheel than you/your children will ever need.  Save yourself some bucks and buy the  the 1/3 or 1/2 hp.  Here's a few words from Neil Estrick from another post.  Neil runs a teaching studio and has more than 10 Thomas Stuart/Skutt wheels.  He also says that the SSX upgrade, while nice, isn't necessary.

 

I have TS wheels with both built in and removable splash pans. I personally prefer the built in, because they are very heavy, very solid wheels. The removable pan models are still very heavy, but I have never liked the feel of a plastic splash pan on any brand of wheel. They're just not rigid enough. As for cleaning, I can clean the built in just as fast as the removable. But with my personal wheel I never really get it 'clean'. I just scoop out the trimmings and carry on.

 

The majority of the wheels I have are the 1/3 hp models, with a couple of the 1/2 hp. I can't tell the difference between them. I do 45 pound planters and 25 pound platters on the 1/3 hp with no problem.

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Go with the Thomas Stuart wheel. You can't beat the large splash pan, plus TS/Skutt has good customer service. My bearing went out on my wheel, it was knocking like crazy. I called in and it was still under warranty, they sent me a new bearing at no cost. 

 

I clean my splash pan like once a month. It holds a massive amount of trimmings and slop. I would never go back to those little circle pans like i started with when I went to some local classes. Taking them off with clay and water in them, I always made a mess.

TS has two wheels, almost exactly the same. I think the only difference is that the pan is removable on one and not on the other. How do you clean the pan, if it isn't removable?

You sponge it out. I'd recommend a drywall sponge cut in half.

 

 

Thanks!  SO you would recommend the non-removable pan?

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Go with the Thomas Stuart wheel. You can't beat the large splash pan, plus TS/Skutt has good customer service. My bearing went out on my wheel, it was knocking like crazy. I called in and it was still under warranty, they sent me a new bearing at no cost. 

 

I clean my splash pan like once a month. It holds a massive amount of trimmings and slop. I would never go back to those little circle pans like i started with when I went to some local classes. Taking them off with clay and water in them, I always made a mess.

TS has two wheels, almost exactly the same. I think the only difference is that the pan is removable on one and not on the other. How do you clean the pan, if it isn't removable?

You sponge it out. I'd recommend a drywall sponge cut in half.

 

 

"How do you clean the pan, if it isn't removable?"

 

All four of ours at the centre have a drain hole/pipe and you put a bucket under and slooosh it out.

OK...Thanks!  Here I am shopping for something I have never seen....Well exactly how I bought a spinning wheel, as well.

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Hi Roselle, I am originally from KY, went to EKU. have you taken your son to Berea Ky?   it is a real artist's town and there are many good potters there.  The Ky Artisan's center off I75 at Berea is a wonderful place filled with outstanding pottery.

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Think I have that Thomas Stuart 1hp Professional. It is a very nice wheel. Plan on it lasting me a life-time.

Right now I am leaning towards the same. Will have to decide soon, so it will be under the tree in time!  Thanks!

 

I am was wondering if you bought your wheel with the "SSX drive upgrade" and if it is worth extra money. This is for a child, so if it would help him, I would pay, but if not of a lot of use, will skip it. 

 

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Hi Roselle, I am originally from KY, went to EKU. have you taken your son to Berea Ky?   it is a real artist's town and there are many good potters there.  The Ky Artisan's center off I75 at Berea is a wonderful place filled with outstanding pottery.

I have heard of Berea...I think we would love to go there!  Thank you!

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Also...One more question...My sister said she thought there was a clay, that my son could practice with, that wouldn't dry....So he could just smash up and try again. My sister didn't remember the name of it and I am "clay" dumb...Does anyone know what I need to order?

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Also...One more question...My sister said she thought there was a clay, that my son could practice with, that wouldn't dry....So he could just smash up and try again. My sister didn't remember the name of it and I am "clay" dumb...Does anyone know what I need to order?

A bag or box of any clay would work . . . just practice making items, then recycle the clay and not let it dry out. Most clays are similar in price (dirt cheap, pardon the pun) except for porcelains. A plain old stoneware would be fine.

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Also...One more question...My sister said she thought there was a clay, that my son could practice with, that wouldn't dry....So he could just smash up and try again. My sister didn't remember the name of it and I am "clay" dumb...Does anyone know what I need to order?

A bag or box of any clay would work . . . just practice making items, then recycle the clay and not let it dry out. Most clays are similar in price (dirt cheap, pardon the pun) except for porcelains. A plain old stoneware would be fine.

 

Thank you!  This is going to be a big learning experience and I so appreciate the help!

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Also...One more question...My sister said she thought there was a clay, that my son could practice with, that wouldn't dry....So he could just smash up and try again. My sister didn't remember the name of it and I am "clay" dumb...Does anyone know what I need to order?

 

Polymer clay can be used and reused. It's oil-based so it does not dry up, stays workable till you bake it. 

 

If you get some: keep it in the cellophane it comes in. Do NOT put it on your furniture or in a plastic container or the oils in the clay will eat through it. 

 

I buy plain white Sculpey 8# at a time from Michaels'. I wait till I get a 40% off coupon so the box only costs $30 instead of $50. 

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Also...One more question...My sister said she thought there was a clay, that my son could practice with, that wouldn't dry....So he could just smash up and try again. My sister didn't remember the name of it and I am "clay" dumb...Does anyone know what I need to order?

 

Polymer clay can be used and reused. It's oil-based so it does not dry up, stays workable till you bake it. 

 

If you get some: keep it in the cellophane it comes in. Do NOT put it on your furniture or in a plastic container or the oils in the clay will eat through it. 

 

I buy plain white Sculpey 8# at a time from Michaels'. I wait till I get a 40% off coupon so the box only costs $30 instead of $50. 

 

Thank you!  I will get some.  You can print of Michaels' coupons on-line, so you don't have to wait to get one. 

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You can get 25 lbs of stoneware for around $20 to $25. Plus, you get the feel of the clay you will actually be using once you progress beyond practice and start keeping pieces for firing. I've not heard or seen of skulpey and other polymers as throwing clays; it is better suited for molding and jewelry making.

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Can you throw the Skulpey?

 

I don't believe you can throw Sculpey (from my experience with poly clay it just would NOT work for various reasons), but you know, you CAN throw air dry clay. :) *wiggles eyebrows* Might be fun! You can't use the things for functional use, only decorative, but you can just paint and seal them with acrylic. 

 

I agree with BCiske that the stoneware is cheaper and of course more fun. However if you do not have a kiln and glazes polymer clay and air dry clay are a way to keep your hands in clay with no extra equipment needed. 

 

You can get 25 lbs of stoneware for around $20 to $25. Plus, you get the feel of the clay you will actually be using once you progress beyond practice and start keeping pieces for firing. I've not heard or seen of skulpey and other polymers as throwing clays; it is better suited for molding and jewelry making.

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You can get 25 lbs of stoneware for around $20 to $25. Plus, you get the feel of the clay you will actually be using once you progress beyond practice and start keeping pieces for firing. I've not heard or seen of skulpey and other polymers as throwing clays; it is better suited for molding and jewelry making.

Thanks...I know I am clay dumb, but what is stoneware?

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Can you throw the Skulpey?

 

I don't believe you can throw Sculpey (from my experience with poly clay it just would NOT work for various reasons), but you know, you CAN throw air dry clay. :) *wiggles eyebrows* Might be fun! You can't use the things for functional use, only decorative, but you can just paint and seal them with acrylic. 

 

I agree with BCiske that the stoneware is cheaper and of course more fun. However if you do not have a kiln and glazes polymer clay and air dry clay are a way to keep your hands in clay with no extra equipment needed. 

 

You can get 25 lbs of stoneware for around $20 to $25. Plus, you get the feel of the clay you will actually be using once you progress beyond practice and start keeping pieces for firing. I've not heard or seen of skulpey and other polymers as throwing clays; it is better suited for molding and jewelry making.

 

Thank you!

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The thing is on the way. I bought the Thomas Stuart Professional Wheel. The sales person talked me out of the SSX upgrade. I bought some bats and have ordered 4 pottery books from Amazon. I know there is much more for us to learn, but I know I will have a very excited child. I ordered from Clay King late this morning and I just received a notice from Fed-Ex that the wheel is in transit. Now for me to figure out how to get this thing in the house, wrapped, and hidden..Considering it weighs much more than I do!  I am still unsure of what we will do for a kiln. I may buy an electric one or let kids try and build one....

 

Thanks for helping me...Now to learn about clays and glazes and on and on we will go..

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Stoneware is fired to a higher temperature than earthenware and is nonporous. Typically does not absorb much water. 

 

It's very important to match your clay body to your glazes. So for example if you're using earthenware fired to Cone 05 (around 1900 degrees F) you need Cone 05 glazes to go with it. And so on. 

I highly recommend that you have some kind of clay and a basic set of pottery tools (if you haven't already done that!) ready as well because he's going to want to play with it right away. And, just as one mom to another mom, I would tell YOU to watch beginner pottery videos and look at those books yourself because then you'll be able to help him get started quickly when the wheel is set up. Like having a set of tools and two buckets, one for water, one for scraps. And a big towel for over his lap. 

There are some YouTube videos especially explaining beginner mistakes. This one is great: 

He has some really good teaching videos. And he often shows more than one way of doing things, which I like. 

I'm not the most knowledgeable person on here by any means but feel free to PM me any time and I'll help you in any way I can or point you in the right direction at least! :) 
 

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Stoneware is fired to a higher temperature than earthenware and is nonporous. Typically does not absorb much water. 

 

It's very important to match your clay body to your glazes. So for example if you're using earthenware fired to Cone 05 (around 1900 degrees F) you need Cone 05 glazes to go with it. And so on. 

 

I highly recommend that you have some kind of clay and a basic set of pottery tools (if you haven't already done that!) ready as well because he's going to want to play with it right away. And, just as one mom to another mom, I would tell YOU to watch beginner pottery videos and look at those books yourself because then you'll be able to help him get started quickly when the wheel is set up. Like having a set of tools and two buckets, one for water, one for scraps. And a big towel for over his lap. 

 

There are some YouTube videos especially explaining beginner mistakes. This one is great: 

He has some really good teaching videos. And he often shows more than one way of doing things, which I like. 

 

I'm not the most knowledgeable person on here by any means but feel free to PM me any time and I'll help you in any way I can or point you in the right direction at least! :) 

 

 

Thank you so much!  I will PM you!  The kids have watched hours and hours of videos.  We haven't seen the one you sent though....We watched videos with "Dan," the gentleman that lost one hand in a fireworks accident. He has been so helpful as well.  Is he on this forum?   My kids liked the pottery wheel in most of his videos...Seems he has multiple wheels, but we wondered if it was the Thomas Stuart Professional wheel. I also wrote to him, because I saw he had been able to become a potter with only one hand....We are very close to the Old Order Mennonites and 2 daughters of some friends, were recently in a buggy accident. One of the sweet girls lost her thumb and forefinger on one hand. Dan actually drew out a plan for a non-electric pottery wheel that could be built, if the girl is interested in doing pottery. I thought that was so exceptionally kind. 

 

The pottery wheel is coming with a set of tools and my sister is getting my son another set for Christmas. I am going to go get drywall sponges etc.   Do you have a favorite book about glazes I should order?

 

Which clay is best for dinnerware and eating off of or in?  Will go ahead and order that and the correct glazes.

 

One more silly question....Can he make up pottery that he wants to put in a kiln and let it sit, till we get the kiln situation taken care of?  Honestly...We don't have air-conditioning, so my thoughts are it gets hot enough in this house during the summer to do whatever a kiln would do....Or it sure feels like it!  HA!

 

Happy Thanksgiving!

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