Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Bobg

Having Trouble With Wax Resist Keeping Glaze Off Clay.

Recommended Posts

I'm trying to make some mugs that have 1/8" thick slab attached to it that has a stamped design on it. What I'm trying to do is put wax resist on the stamped piece so the glaze doesn't stick to it. And then dip the mug in glaze. I was expecting the glaze to not adhere to the stamping, but it totall covered it. I tried blowing the glaze off, but that did not work.

 

Looking for a way to do this. Maybe my wax resist is not good. I bought it from Clay Art Center in Seattle, I'm assuming it's their house brand.

 

Any help is greatly appreciated.

 

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I use cold wax (I use Standard cold wax) I find it needs to dry at least 15 minutes. If I don't wait long enough, it will still be tacky and glaze sticks to it like crazy. I also thin it out with a little water, and try to apply the thinnest coat possible, which helps it to dry faster.

Pres likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I make something like you're making, I don't use wax resist at all. What

I do now is to stain the applique with a black iron oxide stain. Leave it to

dry, dip the vessel in glaze, then with a wet sponge, wipe the glaze and stain

off to the point I prefer. Now, if I happen to be staining a vessel decorated

with stamps, I'll stain the stamped area, wipe off the stain, apply wax resist to the

stamped decoration, glaze, then wipe off any area where I didn't want glaze.

I've always thought that there is at least 5 different methods to do each or

any step of pottery. Sometimes, with luck, the best results are with the first

attempt... Other times it may be the 3rd or 4th method when the eureka moment

occurs. Try different ways.

See ya,

Alabama

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use round price tags from the dollar store to get a resist for my turquoise glaze. See galley.

You might try masking tape or rubber cement.

Also, consider that your glaze may be too thick.

TJR.

Rebekah Krieger likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll have to look at the jar and see if it's hot or cold wax, I'm just assuming it's cold.  I applied it with a foam brush, that way I can just throw them away when I'm done.  The wax dried for about 15 minutes, but it's currently 35 degrees outside and my shop is only about 60.  I'm going to make up some test pieces and try a variety of application techniques to see what works.

 

Thanks,

Bob 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Certain glazes will stick more than others. If you're trying to dip a brushing glaze then it will definitely stick to it. If your glaze is high in iron oxide or custer feldspar it is also likely to stick. If your glaze is too thick it will stick. Ultimately, the wax will make it easy to wipe the glaze off even if it does stick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another thing to try is Latex Resist, liquid latex. You paint it on let it dry glaze your piece then peel off the latex. This would mean even if there are bits of glaze stuck to the latex you are pulling it off so it doesn't matter. I use it when I am doing several layers of design and don't want to wax an area but still need to protect it from getting underglaze or glaze. Using latex means once I remove it I can do further design work on the area that was covered.

 

T

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with the above tips: thin the wax a bit, apply the thinnest coat. But the most important thing is to let the wax dry thoroughly. If you can let it dry overnight, that works best for resisting glaze. If your studio is that cold, I'll bet the wax just wasn't dry enough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had a few lousy jugs of resist from Seattle Pottery Supply. The only way I could get rid of the stickiness was to apply it thin, diluted with water like already has been said, then with a heat gun on low I run the gun gently over the wax. The other thing I do is very quickly burnish the wax with a scrap of saran wrap, its then as good as hot wax for resisting glaze.

 

I wonder if Tacoma Clay Art and Seattle Pottery Supply use the same wholesaler for their wax?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have great luck with Aftosa's wax resist. It's by far the best cold wax resist I've used. As others have mentioned it also needs to dry thoroughly to works it's best ( I usually wait a few hours ). Rather than struggle with an inferior product, treat yourself to some.

 

Don Kopyscinski

Bear Hills Pottery

Newtown, CT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wax resist aint what it used to be. When I asked the supplier about getting the wax resist we used to have, not this sticky waxy stuff,   they just said this is all that is available.  But I remebered it being much different.  This stuff now sold as wax resist in pottery shops doesn't seem to really have any good use, and I wonder what it is good for, but maybe I am wrong.  I have mostly not bothered with this step, and resorted to just wiping the glaze away. However the other day I could see I needed to apply two large areas of different glaze on some plates, so I thought about using a resist again.  As previous comments, I found there is a readily available latex masking fluid, which is used by water colorists, and I bought it at a large art store. There were several brands to choose from. It is perfect.  I used it quite thin, and it easily pealed away, leaving no residue at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found the wax resist worked to a certain extent.  The area I was trying to keep glaze off of was highly textured.  I had dipped one mug and when I saw that the glaze was not coming off put it aside.  I plicked it up last week and decided to try and clean the glaze off on textured area.  I had a small nylon brush in the shop so I started to brush it.  I came off quite easily, so in a way it did resist the way.  The rest of the mugs we brushed the glaze on, which takes more time and the glaze is more variable in it's appearance.  

 

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do all my dusty work under a vent hood that I have over my metal lathe and milling machine.  The glaze would have been hard to get off with a damp sponge due to the depth of the inpressions.  If I can find a decent picts of the mugs I'll post one so you can see.

 

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×