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Clean Up Kiln Shelves

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I was thinking of trying to use a pressure washer to clean off the old kiln wash from the shelves. Has anyone tried this? Does it work well. I know it would remove the loose flakes but not sure of the rest.

I have sanded and ground them but makes a nasty amount of dust, even outside.

 

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water is not something that you want in a shelve. The loose flakes will come off but you need to snad or grind the tough stuff-use a good mask-its just another process.My guess is presure wash will be a bust.Its just good practice to keep your shelve dry.

Mark

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water is not something that you want in a shelve. The loose flakes will come off but you need to snad or grind the tough stuff-use a good mask-its just another process.My guess is presure wash will be a bust.Its just good practice to keep your shelve dry.

Mark

water is not something that you want in a shelf

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Kiln wash shouldn't be flaking off. After you get the old stuff off then change your wash recipe / application. 

Use 1/2 calcined clay so the wash doesn't shrink (and crack) so much. 50 alumina hydrate, 25 epk, 25 calcined epk. I use a small touch up paint roller, don't apply it too thick, no flaking. Other recipes out there that are good also, just don't put it on too thickly.

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Thanks, will stay away from the water. I as thinking of letting the shelves dry for a couple of days before using them anyway.   So far I am using the kiln wash that was remade from greenhorn pottery supplies.

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Hope this is on topic. I've been having a problem with my kiln wash (Laguna) flaking off. I don't remember this being a problem in the past.

Any ideas?

 

Try applying it in thinner layers. Otherwise you'll have to switch to a different formula.

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Also if you have glaze drips that have got through the wash and stuck to the shelf, don't try chipping them off as some people recommend - they often come off OK, but take a divot of the kiln shelf with it. And if it is really bad and you get carried away with the hammer, even if striking near parallel to the kiln shelf, you can end up with 2 half shelves, which may not be what you planned. It is noisy and dusty, but go for the angle grinder.

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got the angle grinder, ready to tackle shelves but cannot find previous posts re which disc is best.  a new harbor freight opened recently HOORAY! and i can get the right one if you tell me which it is.

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do i remember someone saying "the green one"?   and how would i use a diamond blade?

If your grinder is a 4 inch the 1771 discs which come in a 10 pack for masonary grinding (not steel) work fine

the green one is for bench grinders and grinding glaze on pots not shelves

The dimond disc is morte for harder shelves than mulite electrics kiln ones.

Now you did say you are tired of green glazes if I recall?

Mark

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Kate,

 

That is not recommended.  The glaze will continue to melt, and eat into the shelves.  Grind as much as possible and carefully chisel the rest.  It's not ideal to have gouges in the shelves, but it's better than to leave the glaze.

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No you cannot do that -you need to chisel or grind that glaze off as it will just reflux and drift more into the shelve at high temps.

 

The last point is since Batman passed away  years ago and the estate sold the Bat mobile where did you get that Bat wash?

I think the Batman museum whole love that Bat Wash.

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I've found (sometimes) that kiln wash over glaze blobs makes it easier to dig the glaze out after the next firing.  I don't always have the tools to remove the blobs at the time.

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