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Lucille Oka

What is this?

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Chris Campbell    1,082

It might be an old fashioned "Neti Pot". A Neti pot is a small pot that's used to flush out the nasal passages. When filled with a saline solution and poured through the nasal cavity, it can treat sinusitus and nasal conditions.

Here is an image of a contemporary one that looks a lot like it.

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AmeriSwede    5

Chris that was a good try, but nope.

1st hint: this is a vessel from 18th century Europe. However, it has it's origins hundreds of years before.

 

 

Lucille.... is there any particular size associated with that vessel?

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Guest Sherman   
Guest Sherman

What is this and what was it used for?

 

 

I feel a bit guilty in answering this question---so I won't---but I'll tell you how I know the answer: Google images. Anyone who is interested, take a screenshot of the pot, go to Google, select "images" from the search options, and drag/drop the screenshot into the search box. It works like magic---such a cool function. I encourage everyone to check it out.

 

Lucille, I hope you don't think I'm a spoiler for this---I really think it's an amazing research tool.

 

Be good.

 

Sherman

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JBaymore    1,432

What is this and what was it used for?

 

 

I feel a bit guilty in answering this question---so I won't---but I'll tell you how I know the answer: Google images. Anyone who is interested, take a screenshot of the pot, go to Google, select "images" from the search options, and drag/drop the screenshot into the search box. It works like magic---such a cool function. I encourage everyone to check it out.

 

Lucille, I hope you don't think I'm a spoiler for this---I really think it's an amazing research tool.

 

Be good.

 

Sherman

 

 

Holy kiln wash, Sherman! THANK YOU! That is AMAZING.

 

best,

 

................john

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Guest HerbNorris   
Guest HerbNorris

Well, that's better that Tineye, which I tried, to no avail!

I was going to guess that it is what it is, but I hesitated... I should have guessed, I would have won the big prize!

Um, there is a prize, isn't there?

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AmeriSwede    5

What is this and what was it used for?

 

 

I feel a bit guilty in answering this question---so I won't---but I'll tell you how I know the answer: Google images. Anyone who is interested, take a screenshot of the pot, go to Google, select "images" from the search options, and drag/drop the screenshot into the search box. It works like magic---such a cool function. I encourage everyone to check it out.

 

Lucille, I hope you don't think I'm a spoiler for this---I really think it's an amazing research tool.

 

Be good.

 

Sherman

 

 

Holy kiln wash, Sherman! THANK YOU! That is AMAZING.

 

best,

 

................john

 

 

TOTALLY WOW! ... I had heard quite a while back that Google was working on an app like that, but didn't realize it was here now! Thanks Sherman for the enlightenment. A new research tool is always great to have, I think.

 

So now that I know what the vessel is called and what it is used for... I have a question regarding the design of the vessel that perchance someone could address. Why would the design 'need' (if one calls it that) to have two handles placed at a perpendicular plane to the pouring spout versus say a teapot where the handle is generally in line with the spout?

 

I can't understand why two hands to pour would be more acceptable to one hand... unless it was more in line with the dictates of the bourgeois of the times and the refinements of their good taste... or...?

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Lucille Oka    16

Hmmm...interesting well I didn't say it wasn't an 'open book' quiz. I noticed a few said they 'knew' but they didn't say. Were those trick answers??

 

Hint #3 some of these vessels were made with three or more handles, why?

 

Here is another vessel of the same style, from the Netherlands.

post-2283-13151304497567_thumb.jpg

post-2283-13151304497567_thumb.jpg

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Guest Sherman   
Guest Sherman

Hmmm...interesting well I didn't say it wasn't an 'open book' quiz. I noticed a few said they 'knew' but they didn't say. Were those trick answers??

 

Hint #3 some of these vessels were made with three or more handles, why?

 

Here is another vessel of the same style, from the Netherlands.

 

 

I think, since the posset was thought to be (and perhaps actually was) a remedy for many ailments, this would have been often used to administer to the infirm, or children. So one handle on each side for steady handling, and a third handle on the back side for the caregiver/parent.

 

This is from my recollection of similar pots seen during ceramic history class, so it's the old-fashioned kind of searching (that of the human memory). I suppose you can consider it a wild educated guess...

Sherman

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Idaho Potter    62

For crying out loud! Why not say what you think it is? You are all being so delicate that it must be a thunder mug (what my Grandma called it). It has two handles so it won't spill when emptied by the one spout. It's lidded so it won't stink, and it fits under the bed for so it can be used to relieve your bladder. My Grandma also called it a piss-pot. It's decorated prettily so if you were caught carrying it, everyone could pretend it wasn't what it was. Sheesh!

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Lucille Oka    16

Idaho, Idaho that is not quite right, no not right at all, but courageous. It made me laugh.

 

Herb, there is no prize; just learning a bit of our ceramic making history.

 

Yes, it is a Posset Pot. Posset a mixture of ale and milk and sometimes honey.

 

Why do you think there were so many handles?

 

Hint #4-The Black Plague.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Lucille Oka    16

Okay since no one is going to venture forth I will explain this interesting vessel known as the ‘Posset Pot’. As I stated before posset is a beverage, a mixture of ale, milk, and sometimes honey. The reason for the handles is that the vessel was used at communal tables in inns, taverns, public, and private houses. Some of the posset pots had six or more handles. The purpose for so many handles was the ease in reaching for the pot by anyone at the table. Everyone coming into homes and establishments had access to the Posset Pots.

 

The mixture of the ale and milk made the liquid settle on the bottom and a foamy layer rise to the top. The spouts were placed low down on the vessel and used as a straw, a straw that everybody would sip through; sick or well, friend, or foe. If the foamy top layer was preferred, the opening was large enough to spoon out the foam or turn up to the mouth and drank just as we would do a Seven-Up or root beer float.

 

During the ‘middle ages’ people were convinced that the pottery was to blame for the spreading of the Black Plague and many of the ceramic vessels were tossed out, and thrown into wells. The Posset Pot was an obvious culprit.

 

But at the same time pottery makers realized that their products and livelihood were in jeopardy so they began concentrating on making different products such as pharmacy jars, hospital ware, and decorative pottery; being influenced by the work of Chinese and Islamic traders.

 

It shows resiliency and change.

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Idaho Potter    62

I beg your pardon--everyone's pardon! The picture looked just like a chamber pot my Grandma kept under her bed (including extra handles). The walk to the outhouse was dark and often muddy, so night time trips were avoided. Sometimes I'm just a fool. If I really shocked anyone, hope you are back to normal. Lucille, glad it made you laugh--helps to ease my embarrassment.

MEA CULPA!

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AmeriSwede    5

I beg your pardon--everyone's pardon! The picture looked just like a chamber pot my Grandma kept under her bed (including extra handles). The walk to the outhouse was dark and often muddy, so night time trips were avoided. Sometimes I'm just a fool. If I really shocked anyone, hope you are back to normal. Lucille, glad it made you laugh--helps to ease my embarrassment.

MEA CULPA!

 

 

OR Idaho Potter, perchance you were RIGHT... with your experiences. There lies the possibility that your grandmother actually did own an antique Posset Pot (worth thousands, unbeknownst to her) and was using it as a chamber pot. rolleyes.gif

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Idaho Potter    62

Ameriswede: Thanks for your kind words. I've checked with my sisters and they agreed that the vessel in question (and a similar smaller one) were indeed known as chamber pots to the whole family. Sometimes I think I've been on this Earth too long, but do not hanker for misspent lost youth.

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Lucille Oka    16

Idaho, you didn't do anything wrong. I appreciated your answer. It was very funny and with zeal!

The posset pot is very similar to a chamber pot, except for the spout.

We should never fear of being wrong sometimes being wrong is the best part. We don't have to be right all of the time. Are we all such ‘experts’, ‘know it alls’ that we can’t be wrong and have fun with it?

 

We just know what we know from our experiences or from what we’ve read or from what we are told and nobody knows it all and that’s okay.

Have you ever seen "Ask This Old House"? Those men are experts in their field. But there is a segment of the show where they ask each other about some strange object "What is it?" and some of the speculative replies are hilarious!

 

Chris’ answer to ‘What is this?’ was really good for logic and similarities it was quite good in fact and with pictures!

 

Your answer to 'What is this?' was the funniest, thanks for it.

 

You both showed the rabbits that it is ok to come out of the hole!

 

 

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Dinah    6

It might be an old fashioned "Neti Pot". A Neti pot is a small pot that's used to flush out the nasal passages. When filled with a saline solution and poured through the nasal cavity, it can treat sinusitus and nasal conditions.

Here is an image of a contemporary one that looks a lot like it.

 

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Dinah    6

I've made pots like this. It's made for pouring gravy which has oil floating on the top. Often it's difficult to de-grease a sauce/gravy and this design provides a solution.

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