Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Kiln Conversion Updraft Downdraft Chimney?


  • Please log in to reply
143 replies to this topic

#1 High Bridge Pottery

High Bridge Pottery

    Joel Edmondson

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,903 posts
  • LocationNewcastle Upon Tyne. England

Posted 30 September 2015 - 02:37 PM

I am getting a burner :D happy days. I was informed that it goes from candle to burning paint off the wall at 10 metre. Said I would be getting I think 45,000 BTU at 3 psi. Venturi. Comes with everything needed except the gas tank. Kiln is 5.05ftI got 60,000 BTU for the kiln but supplier said he thought less was fine.

 

I really want a downdraft kiln, but is it worth it? I have a bias towards them from research.

 

Seen Simon Leach kiln with the chimney inside but could I work one outside? The chimney would go out the base/side (not sure yet) and I would have a better divider in the middle that is not taking up so much space.

 

gallery_23281_1039_30848.jpg

 

gallery_23281_1039_56968.jpg

 

Ignore the very wobbly chimney stack  :lol:

 

gallery_23281_1039_76725.jpg


One physical test is worth a thousand expert opinions.

 

gallery_23281_871_611.png gallery_23281_871_239.png gallery_23281_871_701.jpg

 
 


#2 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,171 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 30 September 2015 - 02:59 PM

In a kiln that small a downdraft would do wonders to help even out the temperatures. I'm sure you've seen all the threads here on the forum about the troubles people have keeping the round updraft kilns even.

 

You biggest problem will be getting the stack to fit tight with the wall of the kiln. Any gaps will affect the draft. I would think about cutting away part of the steel jacket on the kiln and weaving the chimney bricks into the wall bricks at the flue opening or at the very least having the chimney bricks fit inside the wall bricks, not just butted up against the outer surface. The chimney could run horizontal for a brick or more before going vertical, so the chimney can be framed/stabilized independent of the kiln body. It won't be portable, of course, but you want to get the tightest fit possible so as not to spoil the draft.


Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Kilns Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com


#3 Mark C.

Mark C.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,519 posts
  • LocationNear Arcata Ca-redwood rain forest

Posted 30 September 2015 - 05:28 PM

Put the stack on the outside-simon inside stack makes no sense to me as it eats up inside room.

Take Neils suggestions and make the horizontal run tight before going up.

Mark


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#4 High Bridge Pottery

High Bridge Pottery

    Joel Edmondson

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,903 posts
  • LocationNewcastle Upon Tyne. England

Posted 01 October 2015 - 05:27 AM

Yes I have seen many posts about updraft being very uneven. I will have to get myself something to cut the bottom of the jacket, no tool like that in my box. It would be great if it was portable. I have a stand that could possibly hold the kiln and bottom of the stack with a removable chimney piece? Maybe too complicated. I might be able to make the stand even bigger and have it all on wheels. I live right next to a metal fabricator who would easily modify the stand.

 

I need to be able to move it in and out of the garage.

 

Thanks for the tip about making sure it it a snug fit all round. 


One physical test is worth a thousand expert opinions.

 

gallery_23281_871_611.png gallery_23281_871_239.png gallery_23281_871_701.jpg

 
 


#5 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,171 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 01 October 2015 - 08:21 AM

Tin snips will cut the jacket.


Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Kilns Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com


#6 High Bridge Pottery

High Bridge Pottery

    Joel Edmondson

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,903 posts
  • LocationNewcastle Upon Tyne. England

Posted 01 October 2015 - 11:56 AM

My hands hurt after all that cutting :( Space for a chimney :D

 

gallery_23281_1039_43652.jpg

 

If I extend the stand by a foot and make it the right height to support the chimney, some better wheels. I think it will be portable :D

 

gallery_23281_1039_40810.jpg


One physical test is worth a thousand expert opinions.

 

gallery_23281_871_611.png gallery_23281_871_239.png gallery_23281_871_701.jpg

 
 


#7 Joseph F

Joseph F

    Always Experimenting

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,934 posts

Posted 01 October 2015 - 01:41 PM

looks nice, hope you get some awesome results!



#8 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,171 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 01 October 2015 - 02:45 PM

Bingo.


Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Kilns Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com


#9 bciskepottery

bciskepottery

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 2,729 posts
  • LocationNorthern Virginia

Posted 01 October 2015 - 03:27 PM

To seal the chimney and kiln, try some generous coils of wadding. 



#10 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,171 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 01 October 2015 - 03:34 PM

To seal the chimney and kiln, try some generous coils of wadding. 

 

Or mortar the chimney-wall joints. If you don't have real mortar, use fireclay and sand.


Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Kilns Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com


#11 High Bridge Pottery

High Bridge Pottery

    Joel Edmondson

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,903 posts
  • LocationNewcastle Upon Tyne. England

Posted 01 October 2015 - 03:37 PM

Plenty of kiln cement left over from building my lid. Probably a year old so we will see how it looks when I open the bucket.

One physical test is worth a thousand expert opinions.

 

gallery_23281_871_611.png gallery_23281_871_239.png gallery_23281_871_701.jpg

 
 


#12 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,171 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 01 October 2015 - 04:59 PM

Plenty of kiln cement left over from building my lid. Probably a year old so we will see how it looks when I open the bucket.

 

You can add water if needed.


Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Kilns Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com


#13 High Bridge Pottery

High Bridge Pottery

    Joel Edmondson

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,903 posts
  • LocationNewcastle Upon Tyne. England

Posted 05 October 2015 - 02:10 PM

The kiln cement had some weird oil on the top, black/brown. Mixed it back in.

 

Managed to fit the three bricks to the kiln, not sure on the best way to seal it to the kiln. Would be better if it was not that permanent. Still need some way to hold the chimney stack. Might prop with bricks for the first go. Is the a mortar that is easy to remove from brick like one use? Just some clay from the baag?

 

The burner arrived :D need to decide what kind of gas bottle to get...

 

gallery_23281_1039_37471.jpg

 

gallery_23281_1039_10552.jpg


One physical test is worth a thousand expert opinions.

 

gallery_23281_871_611.png gallery_23281_871_239.png gallery_23281_871_701.jpg

 
 


#14 Joseph F

Joseph F

    Always Experimenting

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,934 posts

Posted 05 October 2015 - 04:29 PM

Looks epic! 



#15 curt

curt

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 345 posts
  • LocationWestern Australia

Posted 05 October 2015 - 08:53 PM

Cool project. I have an old top loader just like yours that I will one day soon get around to rebuilding. However, this and related threads got me wondering: is it possible to have a kiln which is both electric and gas which works well over time if you only ever fire it in nice clean oxidation conditions? Would love to be able to choose the energy source...

Also, I know you have committed to a brick flue but could you also have used fibre? Seems like it would have been lighter and then could have stayed attached to the kiln itself... Thoughts?

#16 bciskepottery

bciskepottery

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 2,729 posts
  • LocationNorthern Virginia

Posted 05 October 2015 - 09:09 PM

Also, I know you have committed to a brick flue but could you also have used fibre? Seems like it would have been lighter and then could have stayed attached to the kiln itself... Thoughts?


Fiber or castable:

http://www.potters.o...ubject13998.htm

http://www.potters.o...ubject31244.htm

#17 Mark C.

Mark C.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,519 posts
  • LocationNear Arcata Ca-redwood rain forest

Posted 05 October 2015 - 10:54 PM

Kiln cement often settles out with brown /black liquid-the key is to  mix it up well every use(hard to do).Keep air out of it as well by using a smaller and smaller container.

Mark


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#18 High Bridge Pottery

High Bridge Pottery

    Joel Edmondson

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,903 posts
  • LocationNewcastle Upon Tyne. England

Posted 06 October 2015 - 04:41 AM

I think you could get fibre to do the job but I wouldn't really want to work with the stuff. If you got some of the fibre ridgidizer or whatever it is called and formed it around a shape that could work. Not sure how long it would last compared to bricks. I do have a little fibre in a bag from removing the two bricks.

 

Is there a reason you would fire gas oxidation instead of electric?

 

Good to know about the kiln cement.


One physical test is worth a thousand expert opinions.

 

gallery_23281_871_611.png gallery_23281_871_239.png gallery_23281_871_701.jpg

 
 


#19 High Bridge Pottery

High Bridge Pottery

    Joel Edmondson

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,903 posts
  • LocationNewcastle Upon Tyne. England

Posted 06 October 2015 - 09:48 AM

Put in the exit flue and cut all the bricks for the chimney :D Shelf and hole cutter for burner entry. Looks ok, would like a little more space for the burner.

 

Going to try first without cementing. I would like to be able to dismantle the stack for moving later on. If I properly fit the bricks it might just work, thinking some small fitting from the kiln flue to the stack made out of fire brick to seal the two.

 

Just happened to find a welder who is willing to trade pots for welding the extra ft to the stand to hold the stack.

 

gallery_23281_1039_76698.jpg

 

gallery_23281_1039_14536.jpg


One physical test is worth a thousand expert opinions.

 

gallery_23281_871_611.png gallery_23281_871_239.png gallery_23281_871_701.jpg

 
 


#20 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,171 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 06 October 2015 - 10:40 AM

Put your bottom shelf up higher, but have a wall under it that will prevent the flame from going directly to the flue opening, or cut off one edge of all the shelves to make more of a firebox area for the burner. I would go with cutting the shelves.

 

How big is the chimney- 4.5" square?


Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Kilns Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users