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ronfire

Prices?

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I think the hardest part is in trying to price the stuff, What are others pricing Mugs, Wine goblets, Plates, Bowls, Dinner sets ect. Heading to our first show in about 3 weeks and do not want to leave money behind but also don't want to have to pack it all back home.

 

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Just remember that bringing pots back from a show is just the same as taking them. They do not go bad like bread or cheese.

Finding the right price will take you time to find.Your work will appeal to western theme lovers and some crossover functional folks. Some it will not appeal to thats just the way ceramic sales are. I take way more work than I could ever sell to all shows and expect to bring some home-that way I always have stock on the shelve.

Mark

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The show we are heading to is a horse trade show called Mane Event. Hope to do well on our first show, we attend the show every year and know lots of people there but this is the first time to be on the sales end. Yes I do know we will be packing stuff home, that would be great if we sold out but not likely.  :P   

Thanks Gep for moving the post to the proper section.

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this is cool stuff. ought to sell.  I once took my dog to a show and did a whole bunch of little figures of the dogs and pretty much sold out. paid for the trip and was fun.  specialty events are great.  don't price too cheap!  rakuku

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I like to compare what other people are pricing similar items in my region. Mark C and i had a conversation about how people will pay higher prices in the midwest vs the east coast.  I would also compare the quality of my work and the experience of the potter/ firing technique as well. If lets say, a 40 yr vet is making the same style bowl as mine, but I am a 4 year vet and they fire wood vs elec ox I would price mine significantly less even if it's the same form.  But under pricing will kill your business and other potters. 

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Pricing is the hardest thing, some think its harder than making the items in question. Start by comparing and contrasting your work to others. Try them out in your own home, and judge cups by volume, balance, and comfort. Try them in microwave to prove to yourself they're m.w. safe and throw them in the dishwasher as well. Figure your costs and make sure you don't undersell or sell just to break even. Talk to gallery owners... They know what sells for what in their store..

Earlier this year I dropped some things off at a store in Birmingham, and the mgr. asked why isn't this bowl priced? (It was a bowl made from seven lbs, rather large, and decorated with nodes). She said well, let's compare it with something similar.... How about 75.00? SURE!!! I didn't say they normally sell for 45.-50.

And was sold within 2 weeks, because of her location and foot traffic.

Years ago I used to attend a "farmers market/craft show" in Mt. Laurel/B'ham.

I went to a florist store and asked the mgr. "Is there anything I can make you in ceramics?". Cheese trays! We agreed on a price, she gave me a picture for a reference, and I made some. Oh, she needed the cheese trays for weddings.

You'll eventually find your own comfort zone in pricing different items, but don't over think it.

I don't think there is a pricing book or chart to go by...just be happy.

Good luck!

Alabama

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Here is my recent blog post about pricing. It's not a formula, it's a process. It takes times, so give yourself time. Your prices do not affect other potters, so do what's right for you. Be objective and honest.

 

http://www.goodelephant.com/blog/the-art-festival-plan-part-2

 

I don't know much about horses, but I think your work has a great deal of appeal and style.

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I like to compare what other people are pricing similar items in my region. Mark C and i had a conversation about how people will pay higher prices in the midwest vs the east coast. I would also compare the quality of my work and the experience of the potter/ firing technique as well. If lets say, a 40 yr vet is making the same style bowl as mine, but I am a 4 year vet and they fire wood vs elec ox I would price mine significantly less even if it's the same form. But under pricing will kill your business and other potters.

 

I have to disagree here on looking to veteran potters for pricing guidelines.

This is a personal 'red button' for me ... so sorry, bear this in mind.

 

In my opinion .... One of the reasons the price of good pottery stays so LOW compared to other crafted forms is the reluctance of many experienced potters to raise their prices to reflect the added value of talent and experience. It is simple to name great potters who are still getting beginner prices because they hold beliefs about the basic worth of pottery. Also, many of them have secondary incomes or pensions. Many believe no one would pay more so they never try.

 

Also, why on earth would wood firing automatically be priced higher??

 

So, NO ... Calculate your own costs, assess the quality of your workmanship, check out comparable work in Galleries in your area ... then, read Mea's blog for guidance on the pricing process ... then, price for profit. It is not your problem if someone else does not realize their work is worth more than they are asking.

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Well am packing for the show, first one. The venue is called Mane event and is a horse trade show with training demos as well, attendance is usually 3,000 per day for 3 days. We have been to the show for years but this is the first time for and sales ( new to pottery ). I did a small spread sheet and was surprised at the amount and value of the stuff we now have on hand with over 300 pieces and priced over $14,000. The hard part is to display this much in a 10'x10' booth without crowding it. Will have display items with stock hidden below. I will post some pictures after the show.

My goal is to sell at least $4,000 so I can build a 12'x16' sales gallery. 

Some example of pricing that I will try:

Pet Bowls                       $15 - $35

Mugs                               $30

Wine goblets                   $35

Dinner plates  average    $35

Serving bowls  Average  $60

Large platters                  $110

Large animal heads        $150

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I like to compare what other people are pricing similar items in my region. Mark C and i had a conversation about how people will pay higher prices in the midwest vs the east coast. I would also compare the quality of my work and the experience of the potter/ firing technique as well. If lets say, a 40 yr vet is making the same style bowl as mine, but I am a 4 year vet and they fire wood vs elec ox I would price mine significantly less even if it's the same form. But under pricing will kill your business and other potters.

I have to disagree here on looking to veteran potters for pricing guidelines.

This is a personal 'red button' for me ... so sorry, bear this in mind.

 

In my opinion .... One of the reasons the price of good pottery stays so LOW compared to other crafted forms is the reluctance of many experienced potters to raise their prices to reflect the added value of talent and experience. It is simple to name great potters who are still getting beginner prices because they hold beliefs about the basic worth of pottery. Also, many of them have secondary incomes or pensions. Many believe no one would pay more so they never try.

 

Also, why on earth would wood firing automatically be priced higher??

 

So, NO ... Calculate your own costs, assess the quality of your workmanship, check out comparable work in Galleries in your area ... then, read Mea's blog for guidance on the pricing process ... then, price for profit. It is not your problem if someone else does not realize their work is worth more than they are asking.

 

So you don't think a new potter should consider that their work may not be priced as high as a vet? I am having a hard time understanding your reasoning behind it.  If you could please explain your point more so I can understand what our differences are that would be great. I feel like our statements are very alike. .  

 

I do not think potters should be "price gouging" based on experience either, but generally a potter with 1-4 years experience should not be pricing their mugs at $34 each (unless of course, they are exceptionally) .  But I would find it completely acceptable to pay that for a few potters I know.  When considering prices, I would be foolish to look at one potter to compare your work and prices, I am suggesting looking at the work of many (as you stated in your final sentence). But a general idea of what market pays for that sort of item is a great place to start.  (and that goes with looking at many. I am studying real estate and I just finished a chapter on home pricing market analysis etc. I think its reasonable to consider when buying/ selling anything) 

 

And when I mention firing method, I did not say "automatically" price it up.  But it's a consideration due to labor time for that piece and expense to make it.  It costs significantly more to fire an item in a wood kiln (assuming we are being reasonable about size of kiln etc)  3-5 Cords of wood and possibly 2 weeks of loading, firing, and unloading, scraping etc.  I am not suggesting a new potter put a poorly crafted mug in a wood kiln and price it higher.  

 

I feel like my entire description of how to price work, is mirrored in your last sentence.  I even explained how under pricing hurts others.  

 

 

RON - Good luck!! 

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I like to compare what other people are pricing similar items in my region. Mark C and i had a conversation about how people will pay higher prices in the midwest vs the east coast. I would also compare the quality of my work and the experience of the potter/ firing technique as well. If lets say, a 40 yr vet is making the same style bowl as mine, but I am a 4 year vet and they fire wood vs elec ox I would price mine significantly less even if it's the same form. But under pricing will kill your business and other potters.

 

I have to disagree here on looking to veteran potters for pricing guidelines.

This is a personal 'red button' for me ... so sorry, bear this in mind.

In my opinion .... One of the reasons the price of good pottery stays so LOW compared to other crafted forms is the reluctance of many experienced potters to raise their prices to reflect the added value of talent and experience. It is simple to name great potters who are still getting beginner prices because they hold beliefs about the basic worth of pottery. Also, many of them have secondary incomes or pensions. Many believe no one would pay more so they never try.

Also, why on earth would wood firing automatically be priced higher??

So, NO ... Calculate your own costs, assess the quality of your workmanship, check out comparable work in Galleries in your area ... then, read Mea's blog for guidance on the pricing process ... then, price for profit. It is not your problem if someone else does not realize their work is worth more than they are asking.

 

So you don't think a new potter should consider that their work may not be priced as high as a vet? I am having a hard time understanding your reasoning behind it.  If you could please explain your point more so I can understand what our differences are that would be great. I feel like our statements are very alike. .  

 

I do not think potters should be "price gouging" based on experience either, but generally a potter with 1-4 years experience should not be pricing their mugs at $34 each (unless of course, they are exceptionally) .  But I would find it completely acceptable to pay that for a few potters I know.  When considering prices, I would be foolish to look at one potter to compare your work and prices, I am suggesting looking at the work of many (as you stated in your final sentence). But a general idea of what market pays for that sort of item is a great place to start.  (and that goes with looking at many. I am studying real estate and I just finished a chapter on home pricing market analysis etc. I think its reasonable to consider when buying/ selling anything) 

 

And when I mention firing method, I did not say "automatically" price it up.  But it's a consideration due to labor time for that piece and expense to make it.  It costs significantly more to fire an item in a wood kiln (assuming we are being reasonable about size of kiln etc)  3-5 Cords of wood and possibly 2 weeks of loading, firing, and unloading, scraping etc.  I am not suggesting a new potter put a poorly crafted mug in a wood kiln and price it higher.  

 

I feel like my entire description of how to price work, is mirrored in your last sentence.  I even explained how under pricing hurts others.  

 

 

RON - Good luck!!

 

Learned from other artsy businesses i own...price my work at what i need to make. Some "vets" never improved their own work, nor did they learn how to price well. Often people don't care if it took 2 minutes or 2 hours to complete a piece. If they like the piece they buy it, if not, they were not my customers. My customers would be suspicious if i changed prices at various venues after scouting the competitioon :D. They know that no matter where they shop my prices are consistent and are happy to pay.

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I like to compare what other people are pricing similar items in my region. Mark C and i had a conversation about how people will pay higher prices in the midwest vs the east coast. I would also compare the quality of my work and the experience of the potter/ firing technique as well. If lets say, a 40 yr vet is making the same style bowl as mine, but I am a 4 year vet and they fire wood vs elec ox I would price mine significantly less even if it's the same form. But under pricing will kill your business and other potters.

I have to disagree here on looking to veteran potters for pricing guidelines.

This is a personal 'red button' for me ... so sorry, bear this in mind.

 

In my opinion .... One of the reasons the price of good pottery stays so LOW compared to other crafted forms is the reluctance of many experienced potters to raise their prices to reflect the added value of talent and experience. It is simple to name great potters who are still getting beginner prices because they hold beliefs about the basic worth of pottery. Also, many of them have secondary incomes or pensions. Many believe no one would pay more so they never try.

 

Also, why on earth would wood firing automatically be priced higher??

 

So, NO ... Calculate your own costs, assess the quality of your workmanship, check out comparable work in Galleries in your area ... then, read Mea's blog for guidance on the pricing process ... then, price for profit. It is not your problem if someone else does not realize their work is worth more than they are asking.

 

So you don't think a new potter should consider that their work may not be priced as high as a vet? I am having a hard time understanding your reasoning behind it.  If you could please explain your point more so I can understand what our differences are that would be great. I feel like our statements are very alike. .  

 

I do not think potters should be "price gouging" based on experience either, but generally a potter with 1-4 years experience should not be pricing their mugs at $34 each (unless of course, they are exceptionally) .  But I would find it completely acceptable to pay that for a few potters I know.  When considering prices, I would be foolish to look at one potter to compare your work and prices, I am suggesting looking at the work of many (as you stated in your final sentence). But a general idea of what market pays for that sort of item is a great place to start.  (and that goes with looking at many. I am studying real estate and I just finished a chapter on home pricing market analysis etc. I think its reasonable to consider when buying/ selling anything) 

 

And when I mention firing method, I did not say "automatically" price it up.  But it's a consideration due to labor time for that piece and expense to make it.  It costs significantly more to fire an item in a wood kiln (assuming we are being reasonable about size of kiln etc)  3-5 Cords of wood and possibly 2 weeks of loading, firing, and unloading, scraping etc.  I am not suggesting a new potter put a poorly crafted mug in a wood kiln and price it higher.  

 

I feel like my entire description of how to price work, is mirrored in your last sentence.  I even explained how under pricing hurts others.  

 

 

RON - Good luck!! 

 

 

OK ... I will try to explain it better ... but bear in mind that this is my opinion only ... I can assure you that many people disagree with me on this. : - )

 

I know many excellent potters who produce work that is well balanced, beautiful in shape, thoughtful in design and downright gorgeously glazed ... but priced at the same level of ordinary work.  I am not comparing years of experience because years are meaningless  ... I am talking about beautifully executed work.

 

If they are not pricing higher than average, how is a consumer to recognize the fact that there is a VALUE associated with good pottery?

How else will they learn the value of thoughtful, well crafted work if the excellent pieces are not set apart by price?

 

So take that four years of experience potter ... say they have worked very hard for those four years and are making respectable work. Should they have to stay at a low price just because "X" doesn't charge more? Or, should they just move them aside and work their way up that $$ ladder?

 

When I first expressed these thoughts about twenty years ago I was met with a storm of $#@#$$$# ... but, I have noticed that now many potters pricing higher and perhaps we will even garner much due respect in the Fine Craft Art world.

 

As to wood firing ... potters are more in love with round and brown wood firing than shoppers are.

 

And ... I totally agree with TallTayl ... nobody cares how long it took to make or how difficult it was ... if they did care, cross stitching and lace making would bring in millions.

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