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Covering For Hardwood Floor - Home Studio?

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Hi! I've been lurking around here for about a year, but this is my first post. I'm a fairly new potter, been doing my work at a local studio for about a year, and have just acquired my own wheel (an old but wonderful cone-driven Oscar Paul). I love it :)

 

I am renting a 2nd floor apartment with lovely hardwood floors. I'm using my 2nd bedroom as a studio (no kiln obviously) and I'm struggling with how to protect the floor. I'm not really concerned with keeping on top of the dry mess, but I am worried about keeping water off the floor when throwing. I need a surface that 1) is not permanent and won't damage the floor 2) protects the hardwood 3) can be swept when dealing with trimming and mopped or wiped when dealing with water.

 

Right now I have the wheel itself on an industrial mat to protect the wood from the feet, and help with noise and vibration for the tenants below me. I've tried a canvas sheet over that which does keep the water off the floor, but it bunches up and is a pain in the butt. Tried a plastic tarp - same thing. The wheel is heavy, so having something that I need to move from under it to shake out outside every time I trim is getting old too.

 

I've considered these options, and I'd really appreciate any insight, experience etc. any of you have to share:

 

-Carpet tiles. Easy to replace but would they hold moisture instead of being easy to remove moisture? Looks like they can't be swept, would I have to vacuum? http://www.homedepot.ca/product/studio-carpet-tile-iron-gate-50cm-x-50cm-54-sqfeet-case/867524

 

-foam tiles. Cheaper, provide padding which might be a plus for both comfort and sound insulation. But would water get in between the tiles and down onto the floor? The description says they are waterproof, which makes me think they could be mopped. http://www.homedepot.ca/product/step-floor-assorted-24-inch-x-24-inch/941763

 

-craziest idea: get a big plastic wading pool, put the wheel in there and never have to worry about how much water is splashing around. http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/decorated-pool-11-x-59-x-11-in-0810064p.html#.VfrU-d9VhBc

 

Thanks in advance for any insights!

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did the same.  it works well if you can flatten it first.  put it outside on a sunny day and do not roll it up the same way it arrived.  a few replacable strips of masking tape will hold down the part you step onto as you enter the workspace.  nothing needed under it.

 

you might also consider masking taping plastic painting "tarps" on at least the bottom half of the walls.  accidents will happen.

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do be sure to clean the floor PERFECTLY before you put down the vinyl.  tiny specks of stuff will stay there and you will eventually have a bump in the vinyl.  and a scratch on the floor underneath.

 

when you think it is perfect, walk backwards holding a large, fuzzy bath towel by the wide side so it wipes the floor as you walk away.  be sure nothing is stuck to the vinyl, either, then lay it down.

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did the same.  it works well if you can flatten it first.  put it outside on a sunny day and do not roll it up the same way it arrived.  a few replacable strips of masking tape will hold down the part you step onto as you enter the workspace.  nothing needed under it.

 

you might also consider masking taping plastic painting "tarps" on at least the bottom half of the walls.  accidents will happen.

Since it's not your floor, I recommend that you put a fairly heavy coat of wax on the floor first. Little bits of clay and grit, as well as water accidents will cause less damage if they happen. I wouldn't use a sealer unless you know for sure its the same kind that's already on it. Floor wax is better as a cushion and protector against grit and moisture.

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Also, look for the vinyl that is fairly soft and pliable.  I was surprised how easy this stuff was to cut and handle.  I guess I remember the days when all vinyl was stiff.  The stuff I got was cuttable with ordinary scissors and flattened out beautifully.  I was able to install it by myself...and it really wasn't that expensive.  Some of the stuff they sell has quite a bit of texture and I guess some texture is good so the surface isn't slick, but I think deep texture will hold the clay dust more and be harder to clean.

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My studio is in a former bedroom and I rent, so it has to be able to be restored to original condition. I got a roll of truck bed liner from Home Depot (on sale-dirt cheap) and it is amazingly perfect for work & water-mops up well. I just laid it down & cut to fit (box cutter), no adhesive needed. 

Rae Reich likes this

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Thanks everyone, this helps so much. I never thought of putting floor wax down first, that would be a nice insurance policy I think. My landlord is also a renovations/flooring installer in his other job so he is very very picky about the condition of the floors. 

 

Speaking of cats, one of mine took up position on the floor in front of the wheel the day it arrived, and spends most of the day staring lovingly at it:

 

 

post-65218-0-25472700-1442597079_thumb.jpg

post-65218-0-25472700-1442597079_thumb.jpg

Rae Reich likes this

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i got Norsk floor mats from Sams 25"X 25", 8 to a the package, $23. These used with duct tape to seal the interlocking seams should hold up very well, giving you a cushion surface to work on. Just a thought.

 

 

best,

Pres

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