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Do pottery wheels ever go on sale?

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If you don't mind buying used, sites like eBay and Craigslist are your best option. A lot of times people invest in equipment early and realize they are not that into it or just don't have the room or time to invest. Then they end up selling their stuff a lot cheaper than market value. Also check the location of the sellers because shipping on wheels can be ridiculously expensive. I just bought a Skutt 1027 kiln on eBay for 400 dollars its in great condition and works fine the guy I got it from is moving out of state and can not afford to move all of his equipment. Got a great deal on some molds and chemicals too. So if your patient and don't mind pre-used equipment their are lots of great deals out their.

 

happy hunting

 

Anthony

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I bought my wheel and kiln on Craigslist. Both were only $350.00 each. The seller just didn't have the time anymore and she'd hardly used them instead she had three boys under 5 years old and was happy for the quick sale. So there are deals to be had as someone else mentioned.

 

 

 

Do pottery wheels ever go on sale? Or are they always full price?

(Note: if it says "list price" or "msrp" is $1000 and every place seems to sell it for $900, the actual full price is $900)

 

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Getting a good deal is nice no, it is great, but buying used? Consider the warranty, is it just warranted to the original owner? Check with the manufacturer about the warranty policy before you buy.

 

 

Bought my first wheel,Amaco motorized kick, from a private girls school. They said that the wheel did not work well anymore, and had problems spinning. I looked it over before purchase and decided to truck it home. When I got home, I went to supply house, and replaced the drive puck. Problem solved with a very good wheel for $125 plus 6 dollars for the puck. 5 years later I replaced the motor with a new one with better sealed bearings, and a little more grunt. Wheel still run fine, even though I don't use it much as I now have a Brent CXC. I the long run, if you are mechanically minded or have a good mechanic, if you know you can get parts, and if you have the need, a used wheel makes a lot of sense.

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Pres-

What's a drive puck? You see my point. Not everybody can go to the local 'supply house' and know to pick up a drive puck! It is safer for me to buy new, pristine, not to say I won't have my own problems down the line with drive pucks, but I hope not. blink.gif

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Pres-

What's a drive puck? You see my point. Not everybody can go to the local 'supply house' and know to pick up a drive puck! It is safer for me to buy new, pristine, not to say I won't have my own problems down the line with drive pucks, but I hope not. blink.gif

 

 

"Drive puck" Hmmmm, I don't know as that is the technical name, but it is the rubber wheel that attaches to the motor that is pushed up against the flywheel on a kick wheel to move it. These wear out after years of use(if someone is careful) or after a few years(especially in a school atmosphere). They can be purchased from ceramic suppliers, or commercially from companies that service other equipment. They are usually 4" in diameter, and a worn one will be about 2" in diameter.

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To each his own, but I must say... I have had great deals on used wheels. I bought a 15 year old shimpo and used it for almost 20 years now, i've added a used whisper, a kick wheel and another Shimpo to my studio as well since then and they all work great and are used almost daily. A belt came of my newest one, and i managed to get it back on by myself. It has been the same with kilns, but the one I did buy new, has needed lots of work, "after" the warrantee was up. of course :)

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skip over craigslist.com and go straight to crazedlist.org but you need to use modizilla firefox if you buy used. Ceramics wheels in general are pretty simple but I would stay with the brents in my opinion and i've taken many of them apart. The motors are either AC with brushes or DC brushless. DC brushless are the newer designs and work well but are more expensive. They have bridge rectifiers in them and capacitors. If things go bad it can be something like the capacitor. The DC motor also produces a charge when it's spinning and the capacitor holds that charge. The bridge rectifier allows AC voltage to pass in one section and the DC voltage to pass in another section so that you can use a DC motor. The DC motors are more friendly to powering up and powering down. They tend to heat up less and last longer. AC motors tend to wine a bit and DC motors are a bit quieter. I honestly don't mind either and if anything the older AC dC motors wine/noise helps me because the visual speed of the spinning action I can tell by the sound of the motor. As far as buying in general. The complete opposite is the shimpo wheel. It's quite and I dislike it because it messes with me and attempting to get a feel for the speed of the wheel.

 

It's a personal preference but as far as buying in general and making that investment make sure you understand the wheel.

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:D

Do pottery wheels ever go on sale? Or are they always full price?

(Note: if it says "list price" or "msrp" is $1000 and every place seems to sell it for $900, the actual full price is $900)

 

 

 

I just bought my Brent B from Bailey pottery during their summer sale & save a chunk of money plus got FREE shipping & a coupon for $70.00 worth of glazes this includes underglazes,pencils & chalk oh yeah don't forget most of the Brents have a 10 year warranty from the company I LOVE MY WHEEL!!!! biggrin.gif ( baileypottery.com )

good luck

 

Vera L

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Guest HerbNorris

"I just bought my Brent B from Bailey pottery during their summer sale & save a chunk of money plus got FREE shipping & a coupon for $70.00 worth of glazes this includes underglazes,pencils & chalk oh yeah don't forget most of the Brents have a 10 year warranty from the company I LOVE MY WHEEL!!!! biggrin.gif ( baileypottery.com )

good luck"

 

Very nice. Give our best to everybody at the Bailey office.

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If you aren't in a hurry to buy scan Craigs List or other such sites. My long time friend and partner in mud slinging started building our own little studio several years ago. Our first purchase was a kit built kick wheel from a pottery supply store that was going out of business, 150.00. When we found out the local rec center, where we fired our ware was doomed I started the search for a kiln. Said rec center was auctioning the kilns but they were old, crappy and needed loads of work. The pottery gods smiled on us and we found a L&L kiln for 450.00 on Craigs List. Small but a true work horse. The guy threw in a Bailey's slab roller for an extra 100.00! Then the pottery gods really smiled on us. North Carolina has a law that any open packages of chemicals can't be sold at auction. The doomed rec center supplied us with a truck load of glazing materials for FREE. Yes, cobalt's, all of them, pounds! About a year ago we decided that we really needed another wheel. Again, with a little patience we found a Lockerbee electric wheel for 450.00, and the seller gave us all of her bats. We are a couple of very happy little amateur potters!

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Clay King has been my best price on several major purchases.

 

I saw some used wheels for sale on the Highwater bulletin board yesterday.

 

 

Is the Highwater Bulletin Board a local thing?

 

Does anyone know of any ceramics classifieds online? (I know about the one o Ceramic Arts Daily.) I am not having any luck with Craigslist (did a 500 mile search and found only one wheel I would consider, and it was way over priced) or Ebay.

 

 

Walnutcreek

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Do pottery wheels ever go on sale? Or are they always full price?

(Note: if it says "list price" or "msrp" is $1000 and every place seems to sell it for $900, the actual full price is $900)

 

 

I sold a Brent EJ motorized kick wheel on craigslist for $500 thinking I could find a Brent B or C in good condition, looked for a year, not every day but almost. 11 months later I found a Brent CXC "Brand New" but an older model on Craiglist for $500. The wheel had never been used, just sat in this person's basement for several years. It doesn't have the reverse switch but that's okay with me. The moral of the story is if you are patient and diligent in your search good wheels on craigslist can be had. Good luck with your search.

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Used is ok, I guess.

But nothing compares to unwrapping the plastic from the new wheel, untying the twist tie from the cord, reading the manual, putting in the bat pins, putting on the splash pan, plugging it in for the first time, watching it spin both ways, (not hoping it will) registering the purchase with the manufacturer for the warranty, and what about that new wheel smell? rolleyes.gif

 

 

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Pres-

What's a drive puck? You see my point. Not everybody can go to the local 'supply house' and know to pick up a drive puck! It is safer for me to buy new, pristine, not to say I won't have my own problems down the line with drive pucks, but I hope not. blink.gif

 

"Drive puck" Hmmmm, I don't know as that is the technical name, but it is the rubber wheel that attaches to the motor that is pushed up against the flywheel on a kick wheel to move it. These wear out after years of use(if someone is careful) or after a few years(especially in a school atmosphere). They can be purchased from ceramic suppliers, or commercially from companies that service other equipment. They are usually 4" in diameter, and a worn one will be about 2" in diameter.

 

I call it a "friction drive wheel" myself. I am revamping the wheels in the shop at UTB. There are several types. On motorized Alpine wheel needed a cord replaced. Now it runs like a cadillac.

Marcia

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I bought my Shimpo VL-Lite from Clay-King 3 or 4 years ago when they were having a late spring sale (I think this was in May). The total cost was, I think, about $400, including shipping (I'm in S.C. about a 1-hour drive from where the company's located). I still look at Craigslist from time to time for kilns and wheels, just to see what's out there. Sometimes you get lucky - that's how I got my Cress kiln, shelves, posts, boxes of cones, etc. ;)

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