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rayaldridge

Show Us Your Teapots

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rayaldridge    276

Babs, I have to admit that the teapot I posted above has a serious functional flaw, due to me not paying attention.  I used to make sunken lids for my teapots, which solved the problem of lids falling out of the gallery when pouring out the last drops of tea-- because it lowered the center of gravity of the lid.

 

But recently, I've been making domed lids because I think they look better-- they seem to complete the round form of the pot better than a sunken lid.  To deal with the CoG problem, I throw them with deep skirts, as you can see in the pictures above.  That lowers the CoG to the point that the lids won't fall out.  However, you need to poke a hole in the skirt near the top, or else when you put the lid on, the air trapped in the skirt pushes a substantial amount of tea out the spout. I forgot to do that.

 

Teapots are tricky.  There are so many considerations that contribute to good function.  That's why I like to look at teapots, because the form is difficult enough that the potter's skills are obvious.  In this case, the goof was obvious the first time I filled the pot and put the lid on.

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neilestrick    1,378

IMO you should always put a finger on the lid when pouring, so that the lid doesn't fall off. The long flange does help, but I don't like that it's all wet and drippy when you take the lid off, plus it just looks goofy and inelegant to me. Another option is to put a locking nub on the lid flange, but then customers have a habit of yanking on the lid to get it off, breaking the nub and/or the flange. So I just make a normal sized lid flange and assume people will be smart enough to know that the lid will fall off when they tip it over. (I hope that doesn't sound too snobby)

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GEP    863

Don't forget about side handles! These are sturdy, comfortable, don't get in the way. Only downside is that left-handers can't use this.

 

post-1612-0-65538900-1442598092_thumb.jpeg

post-1612-0-65538900-1442598092_thumb.jpeg

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Rae Reich    66

Don't forget about side handles! These are sturdy, comfortable, don't get in the way. Only downside is that left-handers can't use this.

Surely you make a few left-handers? Lefties are aesthetes, too!

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Pres    896

Ceramic overhead handles are harder to fit in the microwave. Uhhhhh. . . I know some of you purist tea connies out there cringe at the thought of tea in a microwave, but name a faster way to heat water in a teapot. . . and no I do not put mine on the stove! :)  I put my water in the pot, add a bag or two when lazy, and put it into the microwave for 2.5 to 3 minutes. Let it sit for 2-3 more and pour. If I am not lazy I put the water in the pot, place in microwave, and while it is heating put some loose tea in a teaball, and add to the pot afterwards for 2-5 minutes. All depending on the tea, and the way I want it that day. No, no sugar, or cream, or other in my tea thank you.

 

best,

Pres

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Chris Campbell    1,081

As a lifetime tea drinker I have to mention that all that work on making those holes to catch tea leaves is of questionable value ...

Well, unless you are having your fortune told. : - )

... the smaller leaves come through to the cup anyhow .... except when you are trying to rinse the pot clean ... then they stick in the holes like magnets.

Also, we don't all drink the full leaf teas that would actually get caught ... there are many smaller cut tea leaves that will zip right past your efforts,

Also, I prefer to get rid of the leaves once my tea has steeped correctly ... Those bits that stay behind keep brewing to a bitter taste.

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GEP    863

 

Don't forget about side handles! These are sturdy, comfortable, don't get in the way. Only downside is that left-handers can't use this.

Surely you make a few left-handers? Lefties are aesthetes, too!

 

 

This summer, a customer gave me a great idea, which is to make just one lefty version. It will probably take forever to sell it, but left-handers will know I don't discriminate. And if I happen to sell it, it will really make a left-handers day!

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Dragonleah    2

This is my very first attempt at a teapot! Funny this forum just happened to pop up while I'm working on it! Not sure what I'm going to glaze but it gives me vibes of Alice in Wonderland somehow so I'm thinking black and white checkered with red handles??? Any thoughts?

post-63354-0-35226100-1442678013_thumb.jpg

post-63354-0-35226100-1442678013_thumb.jpg

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Benzine    609

Don't forget about side handles! These are sturdy, comfortable, don't get in the way. Only downside is that left-handers can't use this.

Oh don't worry about us lefties. We've grown accustomed to using things in "Your" world...

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Chilly    329

 

Don't forget about side handles! These are sturdy, comfortable, don't get in the way. Only downside is that left-handers can't use this.

Oh don't worry about us lefties. We've grown accustomed to using things in "Your" world...

 

 

 

As a "long-time some things leftie" and a recent "leftie through injury" I so feel for permanent lefties.  Lefties rock.

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Pres    896

A lot of us that taught, have had to do both. I would often do a drawing demo when challenged with the left/opposite hand. Throwing demonstrations were much the same, even though I could not throw as well, I could at least accomplish 9 with 3. Usually shut up the "I can't do it that way because I am left handed". Always told the kids "Leave the can'ts outside the door"!

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As I often give mold making advice I'll share the form that brought me to mold making in the first place. (From a passion for wheel throwing.) The original teapot was much larger. This smaller version took a few weeks to make.

post-14768-0-31585500-1442888530_thumb.jpg

post-14768-0-31585500-1442888530_thumb.jpg

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flowerdry    128

Dragonleah, that is an awesome first teapot.  Take care with the lower edge of the spout.  This one might be a tad low.  In fact, in my mind I moved the entire spout up a bit on the pot and it seemed to fit the perkyness of the handle and lid.  You've got a lot going on with this pot and I picture it with a more muted glaze.  But, of course, that's just me....

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shead34    1

hello. my name is Shea Dogget im new on here so i would like to introduce myself. i've been a potter for a little over 12 months . i think i was a potter in a few past lives though because it has all come very natural to me. im a member of the Barry Brown clay studio in Corpus Christi Texas. so here  a few teapots i've made recently. its very nice to meet yall . ok it keeps saying my file size is too big . if people would like to see all my pots you can go to my facebook page just look up shea doggett . i want to figure out how to fix this problem though becouse i would love to contribute to the community and meet new potters and hopefully swap ideas and recipes

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shead34    1

here is one of my teapots in my last post i introduced myselfbut im having issues resizing my images. i guess it has something to do with my 24 megapixel nikkon im not sure what size this will be when you open image . this is the first teapot i ever made

post-70887-0-56071500-1443453480_thumb.jpg

post-70887-0-56071500-1443453480_thumb.jpg

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That last one looks familiar.... hmmmpphhh.. beautiful stuff everybody. I have never made a teapot. Maybe one day. 

 

Don't worry Joseph, I have never made a teapod either.... Love drinking tea though....

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shead34    1

okay now that i have this whole resizing thing figured out heres a few more teapots. if anyone would like to know glazes or recipes let me know . i would be more than happen to give anyone anything i know

post-70887-0-93740200-1443454891_thumb.jpg

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post-70887-0-64737600-1443454922_thumb.jpg

post-70887-0-93740200-1443454891_thumb.jpg

post-70887-0-85982100-1443454901_thumb.jpg

post-70887-0-93179000-1443454913_thumb.jpg

post-70887-0-64737600-1443454922_thumb.jpg

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Mark C.    1,796

The thing about teapots is it brings many of your skills together in one piece. In art school a teapot was an assignment and it was trial by fire as the skill set was yet to gell up.

I still have my 1st teapot-two bowls attached at the rim for the body and a homemade wood handle. I think its under the house-as I have not seen it in over 30 years.

If you have not yet made a teapot challenge yourself and make one.

 

Mark

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Pres    896

In college, I was told the teapot was the ultimate test of the functional potter.  Even now I think that is pretty well true. What other form requires the integration and functionality of so many different components?

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spike39    4

Hey all. Been awhile since I've participated in the Forum. This is my re-introduction. I'm a re-acquainted potter having been away from clay for 30 years until Jan 2014.

 

I was actually reviewing these to come up with a different way of developing them to lighter-weight and comfortable designs.

 

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/album/1043-teacoffee-pots/

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Nancy S.    21

Funny you should bring this up! I just finished this here teapot not too long ago:

 

post-14890-0-74241100-1444066971_thumb.jpg

 

I'm drying it verrrry slooooowly for obvious reasons. :) The spout really does come up over the top of the lid (barely), it just doesn't look like it from this angle.

 

(This is actually the second time I'm making this teapot. The first time the spout was too short and when it was fired, the lid was fired on the pot accidentally - and not by me!)

 

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ronfire    50

My wife cut her hand so I started on the wheel, after a week I made a teapot.

Now I do all the wheel work and she try to keep up painting

 

post-66819-0-35939600-1444185551_thumb.jpg

post-66819-0-35939600-1444185551_thumb.jpg

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