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Artsy Babble Translation Please


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#61 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 16 May 2016 - 03:07 PM

Good analysis!
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#62 docweathers

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Posted 16 May 2016 - 04:17 PM

I also do a little bit of photography. I'm looking for a hot, fresh steaming cow pile to get a good close up picture of. Then I want to jazz it up with Photoshop and post it on the web for artistic critique. Can anyone suggest a good place to post it to make sure that those fluent in artsy babble will flex their skills on this masterpiece?


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#63 terrim8

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Posted 16 May 2016 - 09:58 PM

Reddit



#64 Joseph F

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Posted 17 May 2016 - 06:55 AM

I agree with the good story part. I much prefer that over the artist statement. Cause 10 years down the road when someone ask you about a piece your not going to remember the artist statement, but you will remember the story of why the artist made it and that's why you bought it. Things with a story are unique.



#65 preeta

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Posted 28 May 2016 - 09:13 PM

personally i enjoy two things. knowledge about the artist's life and either a good artist statement or a sincere story. 

 

but i DO enjoy something. just the art is half the story for me. i may enjoy it, but i need more.  somehow it makes the piece so much more meaningful for me.

 

one of the painters i really enjoyed was Caravaggio when i was younger. i always wondered why he painted the way he did. just curiosity. Especially David with the Head of Goliath. then i saw a documentary about caravaggio himself and woah did my appreciation of his art increase. 

 

one of my favourite cups is from a local artist who did clay as a hobby as a retired teacher. she didnt sell her ware for much. i was drawn to a tea bowl but when we got talking and she told me the inspiration for it, it made so much more meaningful for me. 

 

i always try to find the person behind the art - whether it is a tv show or painting or pottery or writing. because when i look at their piece i realize i am looking at a self portrait. sometimes the artist learns about himself looking at his art. 

 

because i am interested the human behind the art sometimes i am so torn - when i like their art but i strongly dislike who they are, how they treated their family, their character flaw. i cant separate the person from the image and i really struggle with that. which is a whole other story altogether. 

 

even the meaningless diatribes tells me so much about the artist. 


"Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go." T.S. Eliot


#66 Rae Reich

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 10:30 AM

I also do a little bit of photography. I'm looking for a hot, fresh steaming cow pile to get a good close up picture of. Then I want to jazz it up with Photoshop and post it on the web for artistic critique. Can anyone suggest a good place to post it to make sure that those fluent in artsy babble will flex their skills on this masterpiece?


If you don't mind getting your hands dirty, you might shape it into a Koons-y puppy, dust with glitter, then photograph it so it appears to be larger than the nearest building. Existential! :)

#67 preeta

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 09:48 PM

 

I also do a little bit of photography. I'm looking for a hot, fresh steaming cow pile to get a good close up picture of. Then I want to jazz it up with Photoshop and post it on the web for artistic critique. Can anyone suggest a good place to post it to make sure that those fluent in artsy babble will flex their skills on this masterpiece?


If you don't mind getting your hands dirty, you might shape it into a Koons-y puppy, dust with glitter, then photograph it so it appears to be larger than the nearest building. Existential! :)

 

and you could call it your child's sculpture inspired art and have it be worth millions. 

 

or like chris ofili add it to an image of the VIrgin Mary and you could really offend ex mayor Giuliani and yet saatchi would buy it for a couple of million. 


"Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go." T.S. Eliot


#68 JBaymore

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 10:13 AM

FYI.... my artist's statement for an upcoming solo exhibition in February and March:

 

"I have chosen the demanding approach of wood firing for finishing my work because no other firing process allows the mark of the flame to be documented in such a direct and literal way upon the wares. Ceramics is formed from very basic earth materials and is based upon the same kind of metamorphic forces that have helped to form our planet. I try to capture some of this materiality in my works, as do many artists I have met while working in Japan. Like the diverse textures and subtle colors of desert and canyon landscapes in the American Southwest which have served to inspire me, there is much to explore and find if you take the time to let your eyes wander and explore my works. Sometimes a wildflower grows in the most unexpected place. Other times one finds the clear marks of the formation processes that create the forms. Occasionally, one even finds a little tiny bit of gold. My pieces are intentionally quiet and subtle, often layering the stark contrast potential of differing types of ceramic materials. With each new firing of the wood kiln, I continue to learn."

 

best,

 

.....................john


John Baymore
Adjunct Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

Former Guest Professor, Wuxi Institute of Arts and Science, Yixing, China

Former President and Past President; Potters Council
 

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#69 Joseph F

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 12:02 PM

FYI.... my artist's statement for an upcoming solo exhibition in February and March:

 

"I have chosen the demanding approach of wood firing for finishing my work because no other firing process allows the mark of the flame to be documented in such a direct and literal way upon the wares. Ceramics is formed from very basic earth materials and is based upon the same kind of metamorphic forces that have helped to form our planet. I try to capture some of this materiality in my works, as do many artists I have met while working in Japan. Like the diverse textures and subtle colors of desert and canyon landscapes in the American Southwest which have served to inspire me, there is much to explore and find if you take the time to let your eyes wander and explore my works. Sometimes a wildflower grows in the most unexpected place. Other times one finds the clear marks of the formation processes that create the forms. Occasionally, one even finds a little tiny bit of gold. My pieces are intentionally quiet and subtle, often layering the stark contrast potential of differing types of ceramic materials. With each new firing of the wood kiln, I continue to learn."

 

best,

 

.....................john

 

I understood nothing.  :huh:  :D

 

Really though I like this type of statement much more than a ton of random words. Well done.



#70 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 09:45 PM

i like this straight forward type of statement ...which, for Chris, does include a lot of 3 syllables words. But really. It communicates the goals of the potter's intentions and influences. no more is needed IMHO.
Marcia
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#71 Pres

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 07:54 AM

John,

That is a fine artist's statement. It lets me see what you see in wood firing, and expresses your enthusiasm and for the process and the way you connect wood firing to natural surroundings. I too have often looked at canyon walls and wondered how to express this in pottery.

 

 

Great job,

best,

Pres


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#72 Girts

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 03:12 PM

John, this is exactly what I think an artist's statement should be: informative, adding to the understanding of the background to your work. What I take issue with, and you have avoided completely, is the meaningless pretentious use of obscure wording simply to satisfy the 'write 500 words about your work' requirement. Well done! I like it!

Girts

#73 Mark C.

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 09:46 PM

FYI.... my artist's statement for an upcoming solo exhibition in February and March:
 
"I have chosen the demanding approach of wood firing for finishing my work because no other firing process allows the mark of the flame to be documented in such a direct and literal way upon the wares. Ceramics is formed from very basic earth materials and is based upon the same kind of metamorphic forces that have helped to form our planet. I try to capture some of this materiality in my works, as do many artists I have met while working in Japan. Like the diverse textures and subtle colors of desert and canyon landscapes in the American Southwest which have served to inspire me, there is much to explore and find if you take the time to let your eyes wander and explore my works. Sometimes a wildflower grows in the most unexpected place. Other times one finds the clear marks of the formation processes that create the forms. Occasionally, one even finds a little tiny bit of gold. My pieces are intentionally quiet and subtle, often layering the stark contrast potential of differing types of ceramic materials. With each new firing of the wood kiln, I continue to learn."
 
best,
 
.....................john


Yabba dabba doo-this one hits the nail on the head John no babble talk in it.very nicely done.
Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#74 No Longer Member

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 10:39 PM

I also do a little bit of photography. I'm looking for a hot, fresh steaming cow pile to get a good close up picture of. Then I want to jazz it up with Photoshop and post it on the web for artistic critique. Can anyone suggest a good place to post it to make sure that those fluent in artsy babble will flex their skills on this masterpiece?

 

 

No, you can't do that unless we do  a colaboration. I can't remember if I mentioned this before or not. We once had a dog that ate clay......LOTS..of clay... He would leave his 100% pure clay "extrusions" all around the yard. I always wanted to fire one and underglaze it dark brown and mount a June bug on it and enter it in the local juried show titled, "The beholder".


Fit'in to hang this shizzle up fo' good....


#75 docweathers

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Posted 23 August 2016 - 10:30 AM

I think that's a wonderful idea. I'm just disappointed that you did not follow through.

 

On the serious side I wonder what nutrients your dog was trying to get by eating clay.


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#76 No Longer Member

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Posted 24 August 2016 - 10:46 AM

I think that's a wonderful idea. I'm just disappointed that you did not follow through.

 

On the serious side I wonder what nutrients your dog was trying to get by eating clay.

 

I would have but she killed the idea dead. The dog was a complete idiot; no idea why he did that other than complete stupidity.


Fit'in to hang this shizzle up fo' good....


#77 Pres

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Posted 26 August 2016 - 09:08 AM

Animals often know more than you think. They know what their body needs at times. Cats and dogs eating grass. . . who knows. Always remember the one about the dog that got wounded by a bear and wandered off, only to be found near a river with a clay bank survived by rolling in the wet clay bank covering the wounds.   Who can figure why they do what they do, no accounting for instinct.

 

I am happy to read that I am not the only one who is tired of the dribble that is used to "invade" the artistic process by folks that have very little idea of what ti is all about, or were used to be's that now only write. Reminds me of "Fountainhead" by Ayn Rand.

 

 

best,

Pres


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . . http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

#78 No Longer Member

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 12:38 AM

I hear ya but trust me; he was a complete bone head.


Fit'in to hang this shizzle up fo' good....


#79 Bob Coyle

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 01:48 PM

Salvador Dali was a great fan of poop, it is mentioned several times in his biography, so the cow flap idea may not be so far fetched. I read that he painted a painting of human poop ( his I think) and bemoaned the fact that no gallery wanted it. To paraphrase his complaint... " you can paint buckets of blood and pile of gore... but paint one little turd and everyone is offended"

 

Art is what art is...I guess.






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