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Artsy Babble Translation Please


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#41 glazenerd

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 10:13 PM

 

1. " A striking example of an artist allowing her process to embrace the mismatched flaws of a digital program seeking perfection. "
>>> I really do not know what it is, but I have to write something abstract so I get paid on Friday.
 
2. " Yet, I feel the subject is something else entirely, maybe a reminder of the complexities of vision we take for granted as our mind seamlessly stitches the visual world back together."
>>> I have looked at this thing ten times and still do not know the meaning. However, I better write something profound to justify the price this gal is asking.

Nerd:   synonyms taken from the Nerd Dictionary of Modern Babble.



#42 Mudslinger Ceramics

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 12:03 AM

 

IAE sounds very similar of the "word salad" that bright schizophrenics
sometimes make. If you listen to them casually, it sounds like it makes
sense, but if you listen closely, you cannot make any sense of it.

 

Perhaps curators share a personality trait with schizophrenics. I wonder how receptive a curator fluent in jabbering would be to someone trying to have a discourse with them in the same dialect. 

 

 

 

Oh yes!   I remember 2 art theory lecturers, at a painting exhibition opening at my uni one year, having one of these conversations for real!......... it was appalling, disturbing, weirdly compelling and hysterically funny at the same time.......their lexicon remained student favourites for months!!

 

 

Irene


Mudslinger Ceramics :   www.mudslingerceramics.net

 

'Don't worry about your originality. You couldn't get rid of it even if you wanted to.

It will stick with you and show up for better or for worse in spite of all you or anyone else can do.'

                                                                              - Robert Henri


#43 rakukuku

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 01:58 PM

Translation:  "Me make art. Me can't explain it. Me come up with big words that make no sense in order to conceal lack of verbal ability"    rakuku



#44 Girts

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 04:05 PM

I sincerely hope that this was a one-off experience, but...

A few years ago, we went to the Degree Show at an Art College which had best remain nameless. The thing that impressed both of us (my wife and I are both professional photographers) most was the Artist Statements that were beautifully printed alongside each exhibit. They were masterpieces of totally meaningless gibberish whereas the artworks were (in both our opinions) mediocre at best, and certainly not worthy of any degree status. But the Statements were exceptional examples of the Art of Obfuscation, and probably merited a degree in that subject. We concluded that that was what the college in question excelled in, and possibly helped their graduates get their work into certain galleries with substantial price tickets - for all the wrong reasons.

Or maybe I'm just out of touch with reality.

#45 terrim8

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 07:54 PM

Here is an artist statement that isn't babble

 & at least i can understand this! But notice it is someone else quoting him. I wonder if he ever typed one of these out himself? I am thinking of becoming a "refusnik" in the art-world & refusing to write this stuff. ( I seem to be on a soviet kick this month- have kids studying Russian history)

 

 

“I started as a painter, and pottery provided another form in which to work. So you have the form of sculpture, the form of pottery, and these forms all feed back into
one another. The painting helps the sculpture, the sculpture helps the painting, the pottery helps the sculpture, and so on.”
- as quoted in Rose Slivka, "Peter Voulkos: Painter, Sculptor, Thrower of Imaginative Pots and Plates," Smithsonian Magazine, March 1978.



#46 Chris Campbell

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 08:26 PM

One thing you have to love about artist statements is that they do keep the three syllable word alive. Also, Mr. Roget would be happy to see how often his book is used.
Much better than hearing for the one millionth time that they were inspired by Nature ... Or by hormones and navel gazing.
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>TRY ... FAIL ... LEARN ... REPEAT"

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#47 Pres

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 08:22 AM

Being an art teacher, I was required to have a number of courses in fine arts studio, art history, and crafts studio. It was always a question in the back of my mind "Why was not the crafts included or taught in an art history class. Most of what I got in the crafts was taught in the craft studio courses in relation to the craft being taught, never as a group or even in relation to fine arts. Maybe just the school I went to.

 

One thing I did realize after several years, my background in fine arts, and in crafts-particularly ceramics bled back and forth. As my feeling for texture in paint became more of interest, so did the need for it appear in my pottery. Same thing happens with color, line, counterpoint, emphasis and so much more. So the Voulkos quote is true for me, one of the few things I can agree with as I don't appreciate his work.  :wacko:

 

 

 

best,

Pres


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . . http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

#48 Mudslinger Ceramics

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 12:28 AM

I sincerely hope that this was a one-off experience, but...

A few years ago, we went to the Degree Show at an Art College which had best remain nameless. The thing that impressed both of us (my wife and I are both professional photographers) most was the Artist Statements that were beautifully printed alongside each exhibit. They were masterpieces of totally meaningless gibberish whereas the artworks were (in both our opinions) mediocre at best, and certainly not worthy of any degree status. But the Statements were exceptional examples of the Art of Obfuscation, and probably merited a degree in that subject. We concluded that that was what the college in question excelled in, and possibly helped their graduates get their work into certain galleries with substantial price tickets - for all the wrong reasons.

Or maybe I'm just out of touch with reality.

 

Not a one off. Same experience on the other side of the world.

 

Huge painting with orange circle, green squiggle and a black slash on otherwise white canvas. Accompanied by 3 full pages of meaningless nonesense.  

 

Have always thought the artist could have made a genuinely striking statement on contemporary art if they had reversed the proportions of work and words.  

 

Irene


Mudslinger Ceramics :   www.mudslingerceramics.net

 

'Don't worry about your originality. You couldn't get rid of it even if you wanted to.

It will stick with you and show up for better or for worse in spite of all you or anyone else can do.'

                                                                              - Robert Henri


#49 JohnnyK

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Posted 12 May 2016 - 08:39 AM

As a semi-pro photographer I have judged various camera club competitions where the level of work has ranged from absolutely outstanding to poor. As an art student, part of both my Ceramics I and Ceramics II classes required my visiting a gallery or museum, looking at the works and then writing a paper about my experience. In either case, I told my competitors and my Ceramics professors that when it comes to art, either photographic, painting, sculpture, or whatever, I think it's good if I would hang it on the walls or set it on a display shelf in my home. Most of what I saw at the museum, regardless of who created it, would not be in my home. The museum was near my home, you may have heard of it...the world famous Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento, California.

My first Ceramics prof said I had an extremely limited vision...but gave me an "A+" on the paper. I think that part of it was because I was able to use a few four dollar, three syllable words to describe my "limited vision".

I have a few friends who occasionally go to a "Wine-Art Experience" where they go to a "studio" and pay $60 to drink wine that they bring, eat appetizers that they bring, and paint pictures (the studio provides those materials). Needless to say, some of the stuff I've seen done by these folks would make Picasso look like a piker.

When asked to describe what they painted right after their "experience" the usual answer was..."hmmmm". I guess thei stuff won't be hanging in any galleries soon.

Just sayin'...



#50 Chris Campbell

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Posted 12 May 2016 - 11:03 AM

Judging "good art" as what you want in your home is limiting ... I can think of lots of Art that I admire but would not bring home. Conversely there is a lot of Art I want but either cannot possibly afford or transport. I want the 'Winged Victory' from the Louvre but my house is just too small!

Is Art Babble sometimes painfully pretentious ... YES ... But somewhat amusing too. Also, it keeps the Roget people in business.
Chris Campbell Pottery
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://ccpottery.com/

>TRY ... FAIL ... LEARN ... REPEAT"

" If a sufficient number of people are different, no one has to be normal "

Fredrick Bachman

#51 Chilly

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Posted 13 May 2016 - 11:28 AM

I so agree with the comments above about living with art. 

 

There are some fantastic paintings in the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, but I couldn't live with them.  Fierce, angry seas, battles, famous navigators and captains, most of them would only fit on the outside walls of my house, probably couldn't get most through my door.

 

The art I want to live with tho', comes without description.  If I can't see what it is supposed to be, I think the artist has failed.


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#52 terrim8

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Posted 13 May 2016 - 09:03 PM

I agree with all of the above too. I collect paintings from local Alberta artists- usually landscapes & no babble is required to explain the paintings. I also collect pottery especially when I travel. If I was a zillionaire I would consider a wall sized Monet for my bedroom with big water lilies but my little forest and mountain scenes are pretty nice too. I feel fortunate to have collected what I have and my family enjoys the paintings.



#53 Girts

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Posted 14 May 2016 - 02:04 AM

Agreed. If you've got to explain it, you've failed. In my opinion.

Girts

#54 MatthewV

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Posted 14 May 2016 - 02:53 AM

On the other side, a story or the truthful meaning in words behind a piece can make art more meaningful. There is a greater story and meaning to most of my watercolor paintings and I feel if I took the time to put it to words the audience would appreciate them more. (I keep painting as a hobby and intend to never sell my watercolor collection except as a last resort)


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#55 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 14 May 2016 - 04:20 AM

While I do agree that there is some oblique muddling of meaning in some art speak, bashing intellectualism can also be percieved as dumbing down. There is not so fine a line there.
Marcia
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#56 rakukuku

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Posted 14 May 2016 - 01:44 PM

One artist at our gallery painted a giant orange square right on the wall (like 5 feet square) and titled it  "Not Your Mother's Orange" - price negotiable. There were some subtile variations in the color. And a paint bucket with some orange in it sitting below it.  Would have loved to hear the art babble about it. We should have left a tape recorder and had people register their remarks. 

 

I saw one local guy's artist statement that was so pretentious and egotistical that I thought it might be a big joke. Maybe for my next show I will attempt that and see who figures it out as a joke.    diane



#57 Girts

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Posted 14 May 2016 - 02:56 PM

While I do agree that there is some oblique muddling of meaning in some art speak, bashing intellectualism can also be percieved as dumbing down. There is not so fine a line there.
Marcia


I don't think anyone's bashing intellectualism - I'm certainly not. I take a poor view of dumbing down. What we're all bashing, I think, is pseudo intellectualism. We've all heard it from union leaders, football managers, sales people and politicians. Artists should be producing art which should, in my opinion, speak for itself. I have no problem with someone saying that this piece was inspired by nature (most things are, so honesty is good) or by a walk in a foggy day in the city or whatever. That's interesting. But the kind of stuff that goes on at length about existential reality or other long-winded splurges really is a waste of time and an insult to the viewer.

Michelangelo and Rembrandt and da Vinci and co. didn't need to do this. Where did it come from?

Sorry, but I just had to get it out of my system. Maybe there's an artwork to be made inspired by the existential reality of artsy babble? Could that be Challenge no.6 ?

Girts

#58 Chris Campbell

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Posted 14 May 2016 - 03:36 PM

When it comes right down to it for me, a good story will get my $$$ before an artist statement will.
Chris Campbell Pottery
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://ccpottery.com/

>TRY ... FAIL ... LEARN ... REPEAT"

" If a sufficient number of people are different, no one has to be normal "

Fredrick Bachman

#59 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 14 May 2016 - 06:08 PM

Artists statement can be existential gibberish and that is too bad. but on the other hand, I do find a lot of anti intellectualism that counters the gibberish.
Marcia.
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#60 karenkstudio

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Posted 16 May 2016 - 02:59 PM

In the academic setting (colleges & universities) the artist's statement proves intellectual pursuit.

 

In the create to sell setting the general public wants to know:

WHO  you are

WHAT's it used for

WHEN:   only ETSY cares about when it was made

WHERE:   sometimes want to know where your from

WHY?    If there perplexed and don't understand why you are creating what you've displayed, you've probably lost a sale, and

               an artist statement won't help.






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