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Artsy Babble Translation Please


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#21 Evelyne Schoenmann

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Posted 09 September 2015 - 02:19 AM

I just spent the last 20 minutes punching in 5 digit numbers and reading all the responses and I think I'm beginning to understand it. I'll be ready for my next juried exhibit.

Paul

 

See?!! I told you it's addicting :lol:

 

Thanks to Gismo and bciske we all will be expert art babbling jurors in no time....

 

Evelyne

 

 

PS: I just read Diesel's translation of Gismo's first question. Now, Diesel, be a real friend and post that link to the "Art Babble Generator Translator" please!! ( ;) )


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#22 docweathers

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Posted 09 September 2015 - 05:56 AM

IAE sounds very similar of the "word salad" that bright schizophrenics
sometimes make. If you listen to them casually, it sounds like it makes
sense, but if you listen closely, you cannot make any sense of it.

Also, I was thinking about why some people look at these jabberings as a
form of wisdom and insight... think of the babbling of the Delphi Oracle or
the I Ching. Both provide a kind of wisdom/seeing like a Rorschach, by
loosening your cognitive structures so that you can more easily project
your own wisdom/insight/aesthetic appreciation on the subject.  So, maybe
critics do not describe the art but jumble our normal view of an object to
help us see it in a new way, in a way that we already knew but was not conscious... a la the I Ching.

Thus, instead of some IAE, a few lines from the I Ching might work as well.

I am working on a research project to test some of these ideas.


Larry

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#23 Pres

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Posted 09 September 2015 - 08:17 AM

Even though it has been many years since I last read it, Fountainhead had several discussions of the tastes of the times including these bloated expressions of what is good and proper for society as opposed to the artistic expression of the individual. Even then, there is very little to say about a piece of work, interpreting the artists intent in so many words that say so little, that are so politically correct, innocuous, non threatening and un-contributing other than to raise the critique to an intellectual level that the critic creates a new piece of work in the critique itself. Exhausting!


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . . http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

#24 Diesel Clay

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Posted 09 September 2015 - 09:49 AM

Sorry Evelyne, it's not a translator program. I'm fluent in rambling, semantics, blovification and I have a working knowledge of bull$hit.

#25 Min

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Posted 09 September 2015 - 11:11 AM

IAE sounds very similar of the "word salad" that bright schizophrenics
sometimes make. If you listen to them casually, it sounds like it makes
sense, but if you listen closely, you cannot make any sense of it.

 

Perhaps curators share a personality trait with schizophrenics. I wonder how receptive a curator fluent in jabbering would be to someone trying to have a discourse with them in the same dialect. 



#26 docweathers

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Posted 09 September 2015 - 03:50 PM

My suspicion is that if you got fairly fluent in IAE, you would endear curators to your work by conversing in their dialect. I would also think if you did your artist statement  and description of your work in IAE you would gain some points with them.... But , that needs to be tested.

 

Maybe being a curator is an employment opportunity for bright schizophrenics. Context is everything..


Larry

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#27 docweathers

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Posted 09 September 2015 - 10:11 PM

So what is art? It is something that a goofy talker, who is in touch with higher wisdom,, says is art.  Since the art in the context of  a show/gallery which has been divined by those of higher wisdom to be good art, the patron is assured that the work they select is of a higher order.  Context is everything.

 

You could not sell the same stuff for pennies at a garage sale.


Larry

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#28 Rae Reich

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Posted 10 September 2015 - 11:21 AM

IAE sounds very similar of the "word salad" that bright schizophrenics[/size]sometimes make. If you listen to them casually, it sounds like it makes[/size]sense, but if you listen closely, you cannot make any sense of it.[/size]Also, I was thinking about why some people look at these jabberings as a[/size]form of wisdom and insight... think of the babbling of the Delphi Oracle or[/size]the I Ching. Both provide a kind of wisdom/seeing like a Rorschach, by[/size]loosening your cognitive structures so that you can more easily project[/size]your own wisdom/insight/aesthetic appreciation on the subject.  So, maybe[/size]critics do not describe the art but jumble our normal view of an object to[/size]help us see it in a new way, in a way that we already knew but was not conscious[/size]... a la the I Ching.[/size]Thus, instead of some IAE, a few lines from the I Ching might work as well.[/size]I am working on a research project to test some of these ideas.[/size]


You have a very strange mind, Gizmo Guy. I like that in a human.

#29 TJR

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 07:46 AM

When I was an IT trainer/courseware writer I had a sticker on my monitor:  "Why use a big word when a diminutive expression will do?"  Perhaps it should have said "Why use one ordinary word when 35 mismatched words will do?"

 

Now I know why I'm not an artist.

Chilly;

This is why I went into pottery instead of painting at Art School. The rest is history.

TJR.



#30 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 24 September 2015 - 05:50 AM

Seriously, when an artist stands before an audience to explain their work, it really helps if they can do it for all to understand. I just watched a video of an artist's talk at a museum. It was brilliantly clear and illustrated with examples of the work. It was a mature artist and not full of art babble.

I appreciate these kind of representations directly from creative people. I recently juried a show and the museum curator said she always has some great pieces get rejected and can't understand why. She said she didn't see that in my jurying. At the opening I had to give a talk about the work. I think it went well. It was an all ceramic show.

 

Marcia


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#31 JBaymore

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Posted 24 September 2015 - 09:47 AM

Seriously, when an artist stands before an audience to explain their work, it really helps if they can do it for all to understand.

 

Amen to that!  It is something we stress with our students.  Only use a "big word" if a "big word" is necessary to convey meaning. Otherwise....... just 'talk normally'.  If there is any question your audience does not understand that big word you used, make sure to give plenty of context and some sort of definition so that communication is actually happening.

 

best,

 

..................john


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#32 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 24 September 2015 - 10:07 AM

Lisa said I could post her talk at Mont Clair. SO here is Lisa Westheimer

talking about her work. She sounds intelligent, funny, humane, articulate, sincere, and involved thoughtfully in what she creates. I don't find it to be art babble...but rather providing insight into her creative processes and concerns. Thank you , Lisa

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=XFhZJIkq_KQ

 

Marcia


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#33 phill

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Posted 05 October 2015 - 08:55 AM

I hope all critique continues on in the Monkey Farter technique. Perchance one might gracefully critique my own ceramic vessels in this way, shedding light on the darkened bowels of my drinking vessels. 



#34 OldUberGoober

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Posted 07 October 2015 - 04:25 PM

Artspeak has been a pet peeve of mine for years.  At one show I do every year, I create lttle sarcastic art-speak tags for my pieces.  Had one otherwise very nice lady get mad at me because it took her a while to figure out I was blowing smoke.  It was worth it.



#35 No Longer Member

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Posted 24 January 2016 - 09:16 PM

Doesn't matter what they are saying.

 

“When art critics get together they talk about Form and Structure and Meaning. When artists get together they talk about where you can buy cheap turpentine.”
Pablo Picasso


Fit'in to hang this shizzle up fo' good....


#36 alabama

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Posted 25 January 2016 - 09:31 PM

Years ago the student art association of Auburn in Montgomery booked a tour of 17th and 18th c. painters at the High Museum in Atlanta. There were art exhibits on every floor and many "paintings" representing "art in its most basic form" ie a blank/white gessoed canvas. I went over to one wall and was starring at a fire extinguisher, when friend Donna came over. "What are you doing??". Well, I'm admiring this recessed 3-D piece of art! " What?". Yes, you see how the red cylinder is hanging by the hook making it appear to be floating? "Ah yes, I do!, and I see how your eyes are drawn to the center, and how the chrome handle seems to point towards the black cylindrical hose!". ....and for the next 7 minutes we saw who could out art babble each other making it one of most fun moments of the trip!!! The trip turned out to be a disaster, since the paintings we wanted to see was at the OTHER High Museum, in Atlanta!!! What pencil pushing pinheads decided to have two museums with the same names? High Museum 2!!! Grrrr!
See ya,
Alabama

#37 Bob Coyle

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Posted 25 January 2016 - 11:04 PM

Sadly, much of the popular modern art pieces are IMHO  of less real artistic merit than said fire extinguisher.



#38 terrim8

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 06:44 PM

I just bookmarked this one.

In fact I just used it to create this Artist Statement that I need. What do you think???

 

 "The metaphorical purity of line combined with an ultra white and translucent porcelain form makes resonant the remarkable handling of ljght. Although I am not a painter, I think that the subaqueous qualities of the porcelain contextualize many themes directly from the natural world. I feel that the natural themed mark-making and gestures provide the work with an immediate accessibility that transcends multiple genres of design."

 

I could use a critique of this asap!



#39 bciskepottery

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 08:09 PM

 "The metaphorical purity of line combined with an ultra white and translucent porcelain form makes resonant the remarkable handling of ljght. Although I am not a painter, I think that the subaqueous qualities of the porcelain contextualize many themes directly from the natural world. I feel that the natural themed mark-making and gestures provide the work with an immediate accessibility that transcends multiple genres of design."
 
I could use a critique of this asap!


And if you also sign your name in HUGE letters, you'll be rolling in the green.

#40 terrim8

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 08:37 PM

It only goes to show how desperate I am when it comes to artist- speak. The reports that I wrote in my previous career were straightforward with lots of data. Although I enjoy creating with my hands these days, I cannot understand what most of these artist statements are talking about! So as much as this link provides some amusement, I thought it was actually useful if I just altered a few lines to really give it a try. 

The only place I have seen "subaqueous" used before is in  the context of articles like this:

Modern sedimentation and morphology of the subaqueous Mekong Delta, Southern Vietnam

 

Maybe I'll create a big lettered statement and signature!  

Yours truly,

Mucho Denaros Terrim8






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