Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
jenfritz

Drip- Free Pitcher Spouts

Recommended Posts

Post a picture of one of your pitchers as a starting point.

 

Pitchers spout need to have a proper curve to the spout, and a helpful light groove from the top of the belly through the neck to the spout to help with flow. At the same time a sharp spout will cut drips. An alternative to this that works is splitting the rim/lip into two edges before making the spout to cut the drip with the first edge, and catch the slight drip with the second.

 

 

best,

Pres

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Pres. I use different words. Like a throat the the lip from the belly. There also needs to be a sharp edge on the spout. 

as an alternative to the double edge,. Take a look at Robin Hopper's book, Functional Pottery,  for great tips on balance, and the form of hands to grip various pottery forms.

 

Marcia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A Potter's Workbook by Clary Illian has a good chapter on pitchers also. She looks at the part of the pitcher that holds the liquid and the part that delivers, handle placement in relation to pitcher volume, rims, spouts and aesthetics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have found that leaving a small area just under the lip of the spout glaze-free helps to eliminate drips. After applying glaze to bisqueware, I wipe away a small area of glaze from under the very edge of the spout before firing or I wax that spot prior to glazing. Usually just 1/4 - 1/2 inch is enough (depending on how large the piece is.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A ceramist friend of mine told me that there is a technique where you rub some oil under the spout on the finished piece and then drips are gone. But I don't remember the specifics though. Of course you still need to have a nice curve and shape. However, as pointed out on this article, the kind of glaze you use will also make a difference in whether it will drip or no.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have found that leaving a small area just under the lip of the spout glaze-free helps to eliminate drips. After applying glaze to bisqueware, I wipe away a small area of glaze from under the very edge of the spout before firing or I wax that spot prior to glazing. Usually just 1/4 - 1/2 inch is enough (depending on how large the piece is.)

Thanks Shelly, do you remove the glaze from the outside of the pitcher?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Marcia, I usually use throat for the area between the belly and rim, but some days. . . senior moments or otherwise just seem to happen when you can't find the right word, even though you know it is there!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be helpful if some of you would post images to illustrate what you're talking about, especially if using a descriptive term that isn't universal.  Also, there are repeated references to making the lip "sharp". What does this mean...thin? angular??

I can't imagine what is meant by "splitting the rim into two edges".

Thanks for any clarification.

Edited by Ginkgo
more to say

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×