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Quay

How To Tint Slip

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Hi everyone, I'm new here, this is my first post, so HI! My question is about making a tinted slip for brush and trailer application on greenware. I know how to make slip, but what is the best way to add color? I'm firing to cone 6 eventually.

 

Thanks!

 

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Guest JBaymore

Hi Quay....welcome to the forum.

 

One of the various ceramic colorant raw materials can be added to the slip formula.  It is usually best to do this in the DRY state when you are weighing out the initial batch of dry materials.

 

The most typical colorants  are iron oxide, cobalt carbonate or oxide, copper carbonate or oxide, and rutile.  Stuff like titanium dioxide, zircopax, superpax, ultrapax, and tin oxide are all also used to make slips fire more opaque and whiter.  You can also add commercial ceramic colorant body / glaze stains the same way.  The exact color rendition will be based on the slip formula, the overlying glaze formula, and the firing cone and atmosphere.

 

best,

 

...................john

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As John says. If you go with commercial stains, like Mason, it is helpful to know what is in your base. If you are using a clay body, you may not know.

Go to the Mason Stains website and download the reference chart. It will tell you the max. temp., whether the stain works well with or without certain chemicals such as calcium or zinc, whether it is a good engine stain or glaze stain.

Then there are colorants. John mentions those for white. Black is usually a combination of iron manganese or cobalt. blue is cobalt.

 

Marcia

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Vinnce Patelka" book - Studio Potter handbook - has a section telling what ingredients and percentages will give certain colors.  i found it useful for colored terra sig.   whatever you use, mix it super well so you don't get chunks or uneven ness.  rack

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sorry, judy, getting packed up for a show this weekend.  i think i belabored this subject some time ago.  mostly use mason stains, some underglazes, carbonates and oxides.  check the toxicity of some of the oxides before you use them.  most greens are pitiful, try yellow and blue combined into a green.  pink can be ok, nobody buys it, though.  some of the mason stains don't play well with my glazes, just found a great clear glaze with no zinc in it and it doesn't get milky.  

 

more next week if you like.

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For green try your 100 grams of white slip as a powder in a paper coffee cup

1. For green add 2% copper carb. and 2% chrome.

2.For blue add 1/2 a percent cobalt carb . to another cup of your dry white slip. You will not be able to see the colour change. You may want to add a blue mason stain,to see the blue, but I don't. I just remember.

TJR.

Don't forget to test, test, test.

I am sure there are many books with slip recipes in them.

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denise,  i use this glaze for exteriors so the green stays green under it.  it contains barium and i do not use it on interiors.

 

GLOSSY CLEAR, NO ZINC  CONE 6

 

Kona F4                   35

Gerstley Borate        23

Silica 325                 18

Barium Carbonate     8

Whiting                      8

EPK                           8  (cannot make it underline)

                              100              

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quay, what kind of clay do you use?   if it is white, it is simple to color slip made with your own clay trimmings and dried bits.  do not be afraid, it is simple, add water to dried out clay, add color from a stain, oxide or carbonate and mix.

 

yes there are very complex recipes for some fancy slips that have properties other than simple color.  but----if all you want is color, try what i said above.

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quay, what kind of clay do you use?   if it is white, it is simple to color slip made with your own clay trimmings and dried bits.  do not be afraid, it is simple, add water to dried out clay, add color from a stain, oxide or carbonate and mix.

 

yes there are very complex recipes for some fancy slips that have properties other than simple color.  but----if all you want is color, try what i said above.

I'm using a cone 6 clay from Standard, 182 G. It's a white clay with some grog. All I was hoping to do was add color. The only thing is I know very little about mixing and portioning with how to do like 2% of a certain material and such, I'm very new to the chemistry of it. I was secretly hoping it would be as simple as adding some commercial underglaze to slip I have made and calling it a day...one can dream!

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I'm using a cone 6 clay from Standard, 182 G. It's a white clay with some grog. All I was hoping to do was add color. The only thing is I know very little about mixing and portioning with how to do like 2% of a certain material and such, I'm very new to the chemistry of it. I was secretly hoping it would be as simple as adding some commercial underglaze to slip I have made and calling it a day...one can dream!

 

 

 

 

It can be as simple as that but what happens when you want more of the same colour, I have been in this situation. Always good to weigh out dry ingredients as you know exactly what weight/percentages you are adding. To work out a percentage is easy. 100 grams of dry clay means 1% addition would be 1 gram of stain. Just divide whatever your weight of clay is by 100 to get 1% then multiply that by the percentage you want to add. The problem with adding stains to already made slip is the water will skew your values.

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I'm using a cone 6 clay from Standard, 182 G. It's a white clay with some grog. All I was hoping to do was add color. The only thing is I know very little about mixing and portioning with how to do like 2% of a certain material and such, I'm very new to the chemistry of it. I was secretly hoping it would be as simple as adding some commercial underglaze to slip I have made and calling it a day...one can dream!

 

 

 

 

It can be as simple as that but what happens when you want more of the same colour, I have been in this situation. Always good to weigh out dry ingredients as you know exactly what weight/percentages you are adding. To work out a percentage is easy. 100 grams of dry clay means 1% addition would be 1 gram of stain. Just divide whatever your weight of clay is by 100 to get 1% then multiply that by the percentage you want to add. The problem with adding stains to already made slip is the water will skew your values.

 

 

I see... well maybe I'll have to take that risk! I've been throwing all summer but will have to stop in a week since I'm going back to college and don't know when I'll get to throw again, so it's not the end of the world.

 

ps. I would love to introduce my self a little more formally, what subform would you like me to do that in?

 

Thanks

 

Quay

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The more you post or start a topic or update your status, the more your Member Profile page fills itself out. You can also add more text in the profile page categories, such as Interests, to share more about yourself. And images of your work can go into your Gallery. I like to look at people's profiles/gallery etc...helps me to get a better sense of people and assume others do too.    

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from the book "mastering cone 6 glazes"  a nice clear glaze called  glossy liner glaze.

 

g-200 feldspar       20 grams

ferro frit 3134         20 grams

wollastonite            15 grams

epk                        20  grams

talc                          6 grams

silica                       19 grams

 

total                      100 grams

 

 

I noticed in oldlady's

recipe there was barium carbonate if you are using this for food servin

 

ginny

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thank you ginny, i am so used to this glaze being only on an exterior so i can get green slip and underglaze to stay green, that i never thought somebody might use it inside something for food. :huh:

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I'll just add that different colorants have wide variation in tinting strength.  For example, even half a percent of cobalt carbonate will give a strong blue, but with some stains you might need 8-10 percent to get a strong color.

 

This is something that has to be tested, for good results.

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