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oldlady

Painting Underglazes On Bisque With Brushes

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i have the best stark white stable glaze for cone 6.  unfortunately, i still cannot paint.  i never use glazes that powder off or run unless i put too much on.  actually did have to grind off a drip from this last firing.

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I paint in watercolours as well as being an amateur potter, so these ideas are very interesting to me. I have often wondered how the artists working on porcelain at the Worcester factory in the UK did their paintings. I would very much like to try, so guess I need just to do that - get up the courage and try! See what (if anything) works for me. I think I am too worried about spoiling a pot or two. I can paint on paper so why not on pottery? Thanks, all of you, for putting forward your opinions and experiences. That's how we learn - keeping an open mind and trying things out - I have to remember that! It's so good to have these forums to see how other people deal with problems and learn something new. Thanks again. 

Chris Campbell likes this

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I want to paint pretty pictures on my pots and also figure if I can just find the right brush it will be perfect, I keep forgetting my drawing skills are very rudimentary.  I love all the great info on this post, now more stuff to try.

Babs likes this

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Hi anyone out there in cyber  space.. a newbie here still learning a lot, this forum is great, so lucky to have all of you experienced potters happy to share and help with advice and techniques especially with us beginners.  I have a question about applying a coloured glaze over the mishima technique.  How do you do this without the colour covering the inlayed lines that you have made.  I draw into my leather hard clay then apply underglaze into the lines then scrape this back to revel the pattern , i then want to put a block colour over the pattern, how do i do this without losing the underglazes lines????  many thanks  JO

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trying to understand.  you carve the clay, put a separate color into the lines you carved, now you want to color something but not the lines???  what is a block colour?

 

if you put a colored glaze over anything, it will affect the clay under it.  there will be a difference between the clay that is NOT covered with the underglaze and the lines filled WITH underglaze but the entire thing will be covered.  have done this and it can be an effective technique.  if you want the lines to show without any glaze at all on just the lines, i think your choice is wax the lines only and cover the piece with the colored glaze.  wipe the waxed areas and fire.

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this discussion has shown some things about using underglazes and glazes that might not be clear.   underglazes that you make  by hand have the ingredients you know and have some knowledge of.  those are not what i am talking about.  if you make underglaze, please share your recipes, none of the ones i have are satisfactory.  the rest of this is about the purchased, bottled, colorful underglazes you buy from ceramic suppliers.  we are not talking about bottled glazes.  period.

 

underglazes are made to appear the same in the final fired piece as they appear in the bottle.  what you see is what you get.   as long as you use the same company's clear glaze over only their brand of underglaze at the recommended firing temperature, you will have no problems with their colors.  mayco with mayco, amaco with amaco, etc.  BUT because we are potters, we have to experiment.  it is in our nature to ask "what if?"  and go off doing something the "experts" never imagined.  

 

there is a problem with this in that the underglaze market is the low fire cone 06 market and all the pretty colors were blended to go to that temperature.

 

SOME  colors will go to a higher temperature and others simply will not no matter what you do.  it is up to you to find out which colors will work at the temperature, cone number, that you use.  yes, yes, yes, i know there are some labels that say that the color inside will go to cone 6 but that label is talking about an exception and they would not have to say that if all their colors went to cone 6.

 

read the labels thoroughly.  understand that they mean what is printed and not something else.  your hoping the color will work at a higher temperature will not make it so.  

 

if you plan to use these lovely, bright colors in your work, do this test so you always know what works and what does not.  roll out a piece of clay and press your thumb into it causing a row of depressions.  the number of depressions should equal the number of underglazes you already own.  put some of each color you own into a depression and mark that one with some identifying symbol so you can say "that is yellow from amaco, number  9999".  you should have a finished slab with colors and labels for all the underglazes you own.  if you use another clay body, duplicate the test slab for each clay body. put holes in the corners so you can hang it on the wall.  it is forever.

 

dry carefully and fire to your normal bisque temperature.  when it comes out, i hope all your colors are there.  then it gets fun, put your clear glaze over half of each thumb depression with color in it.  fire it to the top temperature for your glaze.  look at the results and see if all your colors worked.

 

bet some of the pinks, yellows and oranges are gone.  they are called 'fugitive' and i am sorry, they will not be back.

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Oldlady,

 

Great suggestion! I did something along the lines of what you describe when I first started using Underglazes. I took the full line of Amaco LUG underglazes and rolled out 2 sheets of little loafers then lightly scored the surface dividing into into equal rectangles. I used black underglaze and wrote the name in the first column. Column 2 and 3 put 1 coat of underglaze for each color, column 4 and 5 2 coats, column 6 and 7 3 coats. Bisque fired. Then I glazed using Amacos Zinc Free clear columns 3, 5, and 7. Glaze fired to come 6. Each row has the layers glazed and unglazed colors shown for each underglaze color and the columns show me how all the colors, layers applied and glaze look compared to each other. The only color I had pretty much disappear was Rose. So I don't use Rose unless I want to have a faded streaky kind of affect against another darker color. I keep these 2 "palettes" hanging next to my drawing table so I can refer to them quickly and easily while I am working.

 

The reason I did this was I needed to "see" how the colors changed in each instance so I can control how they look on a finished hand painted piece, especially important for portraits and such.

 

I think it's a good idea for newbies to do so until they are able to "see" the colors out of the bottle since they do change from wet to final firing.

 

T

Leecat52 likes this

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if you make underglaze, please share your recipes, none of the ones i have are satisfactory.

 

The recipe below is from George Vardy of Mason Colour Works (stains), the original recipe was developed by Ron Mason.

 

EPK Kaolin 10 parts

Feldspar. 25 parts

Flint. 25 parts

Stain. 40 parts

Mix well with water, add 1 part VeeGum T that has been FULLY broken down in water, screen through 100 or finer screen, bring to your painting consistency by addition of more water if needed.

 

Really need the VeeGum or macaloid, can't skip this ingredient.

 

When using very strong stains such as cobalt blues or chrome greens you may need to reduce the amount of stain if the fired colour is too strong.

 

This can be used on greenware or bisque.

 

I've also used the base to cut the strength of Speedball ugs.

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Hey, Seaweed! I made these back in college out of ^6 white stoneware with mason stains and Mayco's cobalt black underglaze. :) I use Clay Art Center's Baltic Black A now, because the black is crisper with my lowfire clear, but you can totally get bright colors with ^6 firings! ^_^ Some pinks, purples, and reds don't like it, but getting degussa stains will shine up to ^10. Good luck!

post-63665-0-26666100-1439350880_thumb.jpg

post-63665-0-87070200-1439351203_thumb.jpg

florence w likes this

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thank you terry, i forgot that underglaze users use 3 coats to get a final color.  i only use them as accents, not to cover anything sizable.

 

min, Veegum must be the secret.  will try this.  i have found that using green Mason stains makes ugly colors, i make green with blue and yellow and that works.

 

guinea, as always, lovely painting.  who's seaweed? 

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Since this thread was talking about it a minute ago, I wonder if anyone has a list of favorite brushes (shape, material, size) for fine/detailed underglaze painting? I've been admiring Terri Kern's beautiful work - was amazed to discover she uses commercial underglaze. There's a nice workshop in CAD but not much re a specific brush kit.

 

BTW, if you haven't seen the work of Irena Zaytceva (who combines underglazes and china painting)  or Sergei Isupov (underglazes/stains) google-image them up immediately!

These remind me that if I can't pull off a rudimentary blackbird it's not because there are limits to this material.

 

And yeah, if I just had the perfect brushes... 

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there were posts about making your own underglazes but the consensus I think was why would you.

Can't remember the potter who did this  and posted her recipes but she did admit it was her thing.

Think Marcia posted about the black lined decoration, not underglaze I think, maybe she will post here.

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Since this thread was talking about it a minute ago, I wonder if anyone has a list of favorite brushes (shape, material, size) for fine/detailed underglaze painting? I've been admiring Terri Kern's beautiful work - was amazed to discover she uses commercial underglaze. There's a nice workshop in CAD but not much re a specific brush kit.

 

BTW, if you haven't seen the work of Irena Zaytceva (who combines underglazes and china painting)  or Sergei Isupov (underglazes/stains) google-image them up immediately!

These remind me that if I can't pull off a rudimentary blackbird it's not because there are limits to this material.

 

And yeah, if I just had the perfect brushes... 

 

http://rhrising.blogspot.com/search?q=brushes

laughlin likes this

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Hi anyone out there in cyber space.. a newbie here still learning a lot, this forum is great, so lucky to have all of you experienced potters happy to share and help with advice and techniques especially with us beginners. I have a question about applying a coloured glaze over the mishima technique. How do you do this without the colour covering the inlayed lines that you have made. I draw into my leather hard clay then apply underglaze into the lines then scrape this back to revel the pattern , i then want to put a block colour over the pattern, how do i do this without losing the underglazes lines???? many thanks JO

Apply your block color.

Wax off the block color, or most of it, or just where you're going to carve.

Carve.

(Scrape for desired effect at whatever stage you like, wax as needed around carvings.)

Fill carvings with ug.

 

Rae

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