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Wax Resist

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I'm just getting set up to try my hand at working with clay. I have read about using wax resists when glazing. Are these waxes specially formulated for clay or will anything do?

 

The reason I ask is that I have plenty of wax emulsion that I use as a woodworker for sealing wood during drying. It is a white water based liquid that is painted on and turns clear as it dries. I'm hoping this wil do as it will be one less thing to buy!

 

Derek

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Crayons work great too. The advantages are many: Cheap, readily available, you can sometimes buy them by the buckets full at yard sales, easy to see where you're applying it on your piece, no sticky icky brushes to clean out and keep separate from your glaze brushes, no residue on your fingers that could be accidently smeared on your piece where you don't want it........ Need I go on? ^_^

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I have tried a lot of different wax resist and I have settled on using Forbes Wax Resist from High Water Clays. It is extremely easy to work with and I feel is probably the best product I have used so far for the needs that I have. Mainly covering up previous glazed areas, and protecting bottom of my pots from getting glaze on them.

 

The best part is that it doesn't gum up the brush at all. 

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The best part is that it doesn't gum up the brush at all. 

 

OoooooOOOOOooooo. I'm going to try that kind if I can get it here in California. 

 

I'm trying to figure out how to clean my brushes from last week's glazing spree ... the wax resist I've been using from Aftosa really makes the brushes clumpy. Fortunately I have enough sense that I used my crappy brushes for the wax resist but it even pills up as you're using it. Ugh. So unpleasant. 

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Are you intending to dip or paint your glaze?

 

I've very limited experience ... but it is my impression that wax emulsion works much better

when dipping rather than painting glazes. [All: please correct as necessary.]

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The best part is that it doesn't gum up the brush at all. 

 

OoooooOOOOOooooo. I'm going to try that kind if I can get it here in California. 

 

I'm trying to figure out how to clean my brushes from last week's glazing spree ... the wax resist I've been using from Aftosa really makes the brushes clumpy. Fortunately I have enough sense that I used my crappy brushes for the wax resist but it even pills up as you're using it. Ugh. So unpleasant. 

 

 

You will not regret going with Forbes . . . no clumpies, no clingies, whatever.  I've only been able to find it a Highwater.  And if you really miss the green color of Aftosa, just add some food coloring.

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I find Forbes wax is great when applied to the clay body (quick drying, resists well and water-based so it cleans up easily).  However, Forbes has a tendency to peel when applied to certain glazes.  

 

Here's a blog link with a some good info about Forbes and Mobilcer resists. 

http://www.carolclarksonpottery.com/blog/2011/03/16/Forbes-Wax-and-Mobil-Wax.aspx

 

Here's what Highwater says about these waxes:

 

Note: Mobilcer is oil-based and Forbes is water-based.

Forbes wax is a water-based wax that is good for waxing the bottoms of pots.  It dries quickly and can only be used on top of glazes that contain gums and binders. It will not stick to dusty glaze surfaces for resist decoration.  This is the wax Linda Arbuckle uses for her stunning majolica pots.

Mobil wax is oil-based and thicker than Forbes. Mobile works well for wax resist glaze decoration and takes about 30 minutes to dry. Even though it is oil-based, Mobile can be thinned with water to improve brushability. If it separates during storage, shake well before use. 

Do not allow either wax to freeze.

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I clean my brushes with hot water out of the kettle. Even if they've dried out, works fine. I usually use a little dish soap after to soften them, but will give baby shampoo a try. good tip.

 

Has anyone tried making their own emulsion? Supplies are hard to come by here.

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Patat: I tried the hot water this afternoon and it works beautifully.

I found this recipe online to make your own but I have not tried it myself yet. 

 

http://www.instructables.com/id/The-Country-Potter-Make-your-own-Wax-resist/?ALLSTEPS

 

Be warned: the instructions are badly misspelled. 

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giselle, do not worry, anyone who can make it through reading this forum is able to read the worst misspelled words in the world. why don't people proofread what they type?  i do and still make lots of errors.  it isn't so bad except when the spelling TOTALLY changes the meaning of something technical.  and EDIT is a great thing.

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Giselle: Thanks! I had a look at the article and it uses solvents, so I might not try it. I found shellac/varnish work really well (especially  for rubbing back texture, it's tougher) if you're willing to deal with solvents and can't find wax emulsion. Thanks anyway though, I appreciate it.

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Patat: To be honest, I didn't like the solvents either. I couldn't find a recipe for a water-based resist though I really looked for one.

 

Oldlady: Computers, tablets, and phones all have spell check so WHY does nobody use them?! I read my posts over before I post them and still some errors slip through.

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I may try shellac for one of the steps in my wildflower pots, now that you mention it. That might be better for me than wax resist.

 

I used shellac to produce this:  

post-59202-0-43542200-1438585998_thumb.jpg

post-59202-0-43542200-1438585998_thumb.jpg

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Ohhh that's very nice, Chilly! What part of the item did you shellac?

I want to try the shellac on my sgraffito pots, they're taking me so long to glaze ... the poppy one is maybe 6 inches tall and it took me HOURS. I love the design but I'm very motivated to find a quicker way to get the same (or better) results. 

 

 

sml_gallery_67168_947_2002882.jpg

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I had a friend give me some of that for resist carving. Where do you get it? What is the name of it?

 

I think it will work and leave no residue. Best to test it.

Marcia

Marcia, it's sold by most specialty woodworking / woodturning suppliers as 'end seal'. I think it is mainly made by UC Coatings as Anchorseal, but a lot of suppliers seem to have their own labels. I take it you haven't tried it yet?

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I shellac'd the numbers and sponged away the outside.  Probably a different use than you would need, but it worked fine.

 

I've seen that before with a more organic design, the letters came out really nicely! 

 

I plan to do something like this with it: ceramicartsdaily.org/pottery-making-techniques/ceramic-decorating-techniques/how-to-use-slip-inlay-with-wax-to-create-thin-lined-decoration-on-pottery/

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