Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
CeramicGriller

Firing large projects

Recommended Posts

I have a project that will be at least 3.5 feet tall. The base of the project is about 2.5 feet and the cover will be at least 1 foot. The diameter of the project will be at least 18inches. Where and how can I find a kiln that will be able to house and fire such a project? I don't want to split the entire project into quarters and glue it back together because I am making a ceramic grill. I don't want the toxin's of the adhesive to seep into my food. Any pointers or advice would be much appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have usually tried to work within the constraints of the kiln available, not the other way around. My

favorite expression is "you are only limited by your imagination and the size of your kiln".

I know very few people willing to let others use their kilns. Maybe you are in a friendly neighborhood.

 

Where are you located?

 

Marcia

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hard for me to envision the finished design of your project CeramicGriller, but another possibility might be to build it using the technics employed in making what is referred to here in Sweden as a 'kakelugn' (literally a 'tiled oven') referred to a masonry heater (in Wikipedia-English). A research of the term masonry heaters seems to give a different meaning visually (generally stone/masonry rather than ceramic) in America though the concept is the same.

 

Though they've been built since the 1500's (and are incredibly efficient heaters- wood stoves) there are a few artist/designer/builders around building with more modern and unique designs. One such is Annika Svensson, here in Sweden. Here is a slideshow (with descriptions of her ceramic forming process) showing one of the stoves.

 

In Canada, there is Jessica Steinhäuser at Stonehouse Pottery who makes the Kachelöfen (German) in Ontario. She has a description and answers many questions of the Kachelöfen, on this link.

 

These tiled stoves are traditionally put together with lerputs (Swedish) which is a mortar mixture of clay, sand and water. This mortar mixture allows the stove to be disassembled, moved and reassembled, if there is a future need to do so. Using a cement mortar is not as friendly when trying to disassemble without destroying the ceramic tiles.

 

For what it's worth... just another idea which could possibly be utilized in your design, without the constraints of sizes or lack of very large kiln. wink.gif

 

Good luck on your project..... as a grill aficionado, I find the sound of your project interesting.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a project that will be at least 3.5 feet tall. The base of the project is about 2.5 feet and the cover will be at least 1 foot. The diameter of the project will be at least 18inches. Where and how can I find a kiln that will be able to house and fire such a project? I don't want to split the entire project into quarters and glue it back together because I am making a ceramic grill. I don't want the toxin's of the adhesive to seep into my food. Any pointers or advice would be much appreciated.

 

 

Perhaps a local school or college would offer the use of their kiln in trade for something or a small fee?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Use a non-toxic adhesive?

 

 

Is there such thing as a non-toxic adhesive that can withstand high temperatures as high as 1000 degree's?

 

 

 

Where are you located?

 

Marcia

 

 

 

 

I am located in Miami, my neighborhood isn't friend but I am willing to pay an artist to use their large kiln.

 

Hard for me to envision the finished design of your project CeramicGriller, but another possibility might be to build it using the technics employed in making what is referred to here in Sweden as a 'kakelugn' (literally a 'tiled oven') referred to a masonry heater (in Wikipedia-English). A research of the term masonry heaters seems to give a different meaning visually (generally stone/masonry rather than ceramic) in America though the concept is the same.

 

Though they've been built since the 1500's (and are incredibly efficient heaters- wood stoves) there are a few artist/designer/builders around building with more modern and unique designs. One such is Annika Svensson, here in Sweden. Here is a slideshow (with descriptions of her ceramic forming process) showing one of the stoves.

 

In Canada, there is Jessica Steinhäuser at Stonehouse Pottery who makes the Kachelöfen (German) in Ontario. She has a description and answers many questions of the Kachelöfen, on this link.

 

These tiled stoves are traditionally put together with lerputs (Swedish) which is a mortar mixture of clay, sand and water. This mortar mixture allows the stove to be disassembled, moved and reassembled, if there is a future need to do so. Using a cement mortar is not as friendly when trying to disassemble without destroying the ceramic tiles.

 

For what it's worth... just another idea which could possibly be utilized in your design, without the constraints of sizes or lack of very large kiln. wink.gif

 

Good luck on your project..... as a grill aficionado, I find the sound of your project interesting.

 

 

 

Annika Svensson's furnace is beautiful! I was considering dividing my project into sections. However, I want the project to look seamless. I still don't know what I could do to attach the pieces together. My biggest problem is unlike those furnaces, I will be placing my food inside the grill and I am afraid of the toxin's would release by the adhesive and into my food during a slow cook (yummm slow cooked ribs!).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Perhaps a local school or college would offer the use of their kiln in trade for something or a small fee?

 

 

I'm currently attending college and I spoke with my ceramics professor and she said my project is beyond the limitation of the school kilns.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a project that will be at least 3.5 feet tall. The base of the project is about 2.5 feet and the cover will be at least 1 foot. The diameter of the project will be at least 18inches. Where and how can I find a kiln that will be able to house and fire such a project? I don't want to split the entire project into quarters and glue it back together because I am making a ceramic grill. I don't want the toxin's of the adhesive to seep into my food. Any pointers or advice would be much appreciated.

 

 

You don't mention your firing needs-what temp is your clay, do you want OX or Reduction? I have fired pieces this tall in a sectional kiln 48" tall, and 27 in diameter. Does not seem to be a problem, most HS would probably have that size of kiln if they have a ceramics program.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can’t locate a kiln large enough to fire your piece, you can reconstruct your design so that the sections appear ‘seamless’. You can utilize an overhanging trim and/or use channel locks so that when two or more pieces are put together they appear to be a one piece construction. A mortar used in making brick barbeque grills could be used to assure stability at the join.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hard for me to envision the finished design of your project CeramicGriller, but another possibility might be to build it using the technics employed in making what is referred to here in Sweden as a 'kakelugn' (literally a 'tiled oven') referred to a masonry heater (in Wikipedia-English). A research of the term masonry heaters seems to give a different meaning visually (generally stone/masonry rather than ceramic) in America though the concept is the same.

 

Though they've been built since the 1500's (and are incredibly efficient heaters- wood stoves) there are a few artist/designer/builders around building with more modern and unique designs. One such is Annika Svensson, here in Sweden. Here is a slideshow (with descriptions of her ceramic forming process) showing one of the stoves.

 

In Canada, there is Jessica Steinhäuser at Stonehouse Pottery who makes the Kachelöfen (German) in Ontario. She has a description and answers many questions of the Kachelöfen, on this link.

 

These tiled stoves are traditionally put together with lerputs (Swedish) which is a mortar mixture of clay, sand and water. This mortar mixture allows the stove to be disassembled, moved and reassembled, if there is a future need to do so. Using a cement mortar is not as friendly when trying to disassemble without destroying the ceramic tiles.

 

For what it's worth... just another idea which could possibly be utilized in your design, without the constraints of sizes or lack of very large kiln. wink.gif

 

Good luck on your project..... as a grill aficionado, I find the sound of your project interesting.

 

 

 

jessica's Kachelofens are great. I have seen two collections of Historical Kachelofens in Northern Italy in Trento and in a smaller town north nearer the Austrian border. There was a modern manufacturer nearby also. I had the opportunity to read about the inner baffle systems while researching them in the library at the Castle of Buonconsiglia. They are a really interesting design

down to the stoking on the other side of the wall to keep the living space dust free.

Marcia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not that I am discouraging your making your own grill, but you might consider repurposing large terra cotta flower pots for your project. If you check YouTube for clay pot smoker, or such, there are a lot of videos to give you ideas. Some of the ideas in the videos would be helpful if you decide to proceed with your own making of a grill. How to support grills, adding places for wood chips, etc. You can also Google DIY tandoor, or DIY Kamado, for some other ideas if you don't need a portable cooker.

 

I must admit that I am a fan of Lucille Oka's multi-part design idea. That would be my direction, as the grill will be heating up and cooling down and may need some "wiggle" room as it expands and contracts.

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.