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How Much Do You Sell Your Mugs For?


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Poll: How Much Do You Sell Your Mugs For? (52 member(s) have cast votes)

How much do you sell your mugs for?

  1. $12-15 (15 votes [28.85%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 28.85%

  2. $16-$17 (5 votes [9.62%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 9.62%

  3. $18-19 (9 votes [17.31%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 17.31%

  4. $20-21 (8 votes [15.38%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 15.38%

  5. $22-25 (4 votes [7.69%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 7.69%

  6. $26-30 (7 votes [13.46%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 13.46%

  7. $31-40 (3 votes [5.77%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 5.77%

  8. $41-50 (1 votes [1.92%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 1.92%

  9. $50 + (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

How much do you sell a 16" platter/bowl for

  1. $30-39 (15 votes [28.85%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 28.85%

  2. $40-49 (2 votes [3.85%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 3.85%

  3. $50-59 (7 votes [13.46%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 13.46%

  4. $60-69 (4 votes [7.69%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 7.69%

  5. $70-79 (7 votes [13.46%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 13.46%

  6. $80-89 (7 votes [13.46%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 13.46%

  7. $90-99 (1 votes [1.92%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 1.92%

  8. $100-109 (1 votes [1.92%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 1.92%

  9. $110 -119 (3 votes [5.77%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 5.77%

  10. $120-129 (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  11. $130-139 (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  12. $140-149 (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  13. $150-159 (2 votes [3.85%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 3.85%

  14. $160-169 (1 votes [1.92%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 1.92%

  15. $170-179 (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  16. $180 + (2 votes [3.85%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 3.85%

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#61 GEP

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Posted 06 November 2016 - 02:34 PM

Thanks for the tip, Min and Mark! I am currently brainstorming ideas for updating my display at the end of this year. "Hanging mugs" is on my list now.
Mea Rhee
Good Elephant Pottery
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#62 Diesel Clay

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Posted 06 November 2016 - 03:52 PM

I agree with Mea so. Very. Much. About the selling situation being very subjective.
In my area, certain aesthetics and quality are both big factors as well as an artist's client base. Certain people are looking for a cheap mug, and others don't even bat an eye at the price, as long as it has the look or feel they want.

As an example, I was at a show earlier this fall that is known for a rather broad customer base, with a lot of varied tastes coming through the door. I was placed in very close proximity to a production potter that I'd met a couple of times before. Her price point is a bit lower than mine, but I've been doing a lot more decorative work lately, and I've been charging accordingly. Because we were so close together and we knew each other, we agreed to split the difference on our mug prices as an experiment. I lowered my price 3 dollars, and she raised hers so they were the same for a comparably sized mug. We sold about the same number of mugs, but what I noticed is that the people that bought my work didn't even check the price tag first. They'd check the handle for a good feel, and pass it to me to be wrapped up. If they weren't so excited about my artistic choices, they would use whatever smoke bomb statement to get out of my booth and move on, but no one once brought up my price point.

Another potting couple that I'm closer with has a price point that is $5 more than mine, and 90% of what they sell is mugs. They're all hand painted with all kinds of unique, usually trendy images (owls, robots, monsters, foxes, sloths, etc.), and they have been in business for 6 years now. They don't have to actively sell anything. It runs out of their booth at a rather alarming rate. They have their product dialled in very tightly, they know who their customers are and where to find them, and they make good profit because of that. Their work is more time consuming than production pottery, but it's what they like to make.

#63 Mark C.

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Posted 06 November 2016 - 04:14 PM

Thanks for the tip, Min and Mark! I am currently brainstorming ideas for updating my display at the end of this year. "Hanging mugs" is on my list now.

I show more on the top shelve below the hanging ones than are hanging. A few hanging ones I find really help -thats why if you look at my display in all the booth shots I have posted you will see almost every rack has the horizontal pegs for mugs at top.A few potters including myself around here learned this in the 70's about hanging mugs.I guess there are still a lot of things I never think about after learning-this one fell threw my cranks -thank Min for bring it up.

The funny thing is all my outlets do not hang my mugs as they like to keep the traditional flat displays.

I will add that my rack are made to display certain forms on certain levels and that could be another subject altogether.


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#64 SydneyGee

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Posted 07 November 2016 - 12:07 PM

I think from what little I have seen and heard is, the older generation will gripe about the cost a lot quicker, but still ultimately buy, unlike the than the younger. The younger agrees the price is fair, but cannot afford it. It also depends on you appreciation of art and craftsmanship. You are not just buying a mug to hold your coffee, you are purchasing someone's talent and care for their product. Something to appreciate and enjoy using, not just out of necessity. Same with clothing, we could all just wear white t-shirts and blue jeans from a department store, but many choose designer and quality clothing to make a statement and enjoy their style and quality.


 

 

 

Might as well admit it, i'm addicted to clay....


#65 SydneyGee

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Posted 07 November 2016 - 12:07 PM

(I realize this is preaching to the choir, but many reading this right off the internet might see things a different way).


 

 

 

Might as well admit it, i'm addicted to clay....


#66 Rex Johnson

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 03:12 PM

...I've read all this thread. All this talk about competitive show pricing just pushes me further away from wanting to do arts 'n 'krafts shows at all.

Been there done that.

But that's just me.


www.earthbasedceramics.com


#67 Stephen

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Posted 23 November 2016 - 06:06 PM

I love doing shows, its the B Part of the process. Tons of nice people complimenting and buying the work is what keeps me focused in my studio and constantly trying to improve my work and add forms. Of the shows I've done I have yet to encounter another artist that wasn't friendly and respectful. Thats out of a couple dozen one day and maybe approaching a dozen 2-3 day shows.




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