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Spring Mold

Recipe For Neat Oxides

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Spring Mold    0

Hi,

 

I like decorating my ceramic pieces with neat oxides (oxides not added in glazes, but used on green or bisque ware to pick up details and refired with or without transparent glazes).

 

I have copper oxide, copper carbonate, manganese dioxide, cobalt oxide, red iron oxide and black iron oxide. I use white stoneware and porcelain paperclay mainly. The pieces are then fired in reduction (oxidasation).

 

My questions are:

 

1. What should I add to each oxide, to go on the type of clays I use? (water only? what ratio? anything else? how about firing temperature?)

2. I prefer mat glazes, is there a mat glaze recipe to use with these oxides?

 

Many Thanks,

 

Spring Mold. :-)

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

The firing temperature should be the maturity temperature of your clay.

If you are using oxidation you may not like the iron oxide. Copper carb works great in Oxidation. Use much caution with the manganese dioxide in direct contact, and in breathing fumes during firing. Big hazard!

You can make a wash with any of the oxides. If you need a flux, add some frit or gerstley borate. A good underglaze stain recipe is 1/3 Frit 3110, 1/3 kaolin and 1/3 stain...can apply to oxides when using as you describe..to accent texture. It can flake if applied if on too thick.

 

Marciar

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Bobg    4

I just take some of the the clay I'm building pots out of, put it in a blender with a little water. Process it until you get to the thickness you like, I make mine almost like pudding. I then add a certain percentage of oxide and you'll have to play with this. I mix 5% cobalt for my blue items.

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bciskepottery    925

Here is a link to information posted by Vince Pitelka, Appalachian Center for Craft, on oxide stains and patinas:

 

http://iweb.tntech.edu/wpitelka/syllabi-handouts/handouts/patinas%20and%20glazes.htm

 

I've followed his recipes with good results at Cone 6; some of my handbuilding students used them for raku firings and were pleased.

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Spring Mold    0

The firing temperature should be the maturity temperature of your clay.

If you are using oxidation you may not like the iron oxide. Copper carb works great in Oxidation. Use much caution with the manganese dioxide in direct contact, and in breathing fumes during firing. Big hazard!

You can make a wash with any of the oxides. If you need a flux, add some fit or gerstley borate. A good underglaze stain recipe is 1/4 Frit 3110, 1/3 kaolin and 1/3 stain...can apply to oxides when using as you describe..to accent texture. It can bistro if apply as decoration or if on too thick.

 

Marcia

 

 

"... you may not like the iron oxide." Is that because the iron oxide can be unstable when fired? I have noticed that on fully fired paper porcelain, iron oxide has almost vanished.

 

Thank you for your reply, Marcia. :)

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Spring Mold    0

I just take some of the the clay I'm building pots out of, put it in a blender with a little water. Process it until you get to the thickness you like, I make mine almost like pudding. I then add a certain percentage of oxide and you'll have to play with this. I mix 5% cobalt for my blue items.

 

 

Thank you for your reply. :)

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

The firing temperature should be the maturity temperature of your clay.

If you are using oxidation you may not like the iron oxide. Copper carb works great in Oxidation. Use much caution with the manganese dioxide in direct contact, and in breathing fumes during firing. Big hazard!

You can make a wash with any of the oxides. If you need a flux, add some fit or gerstley borate. A good underglaze stain recipe is 1/4 Frit 3110, 1/3 kaolin and 1/3 stain...can apply to oxides when using as you describe..to accent texture. It can bistro if apply as decoration or if on too thick.

 

Marcia

 

 

"... you may not like the iron oxide." Is that because the iron oxide can be unstable when fired? I have noticed that on fully fired paper porcelain, iron oxide has almost vanished.

 

Thank you for your reply, Marcia. :)

 

I prefer the copper rather than iron in oxidation because the copper is richer. The iron just looks wimpy to me..not rich. Many Eastern Europeans use copper this way to accent their work.

Marcia

 

 

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Spring Mold    0

Here is a link to information posted by Vince Pitelka, Appalachian Center for Craft, on oxide stains and patinas:

 

http://iweb.tntech.e...nd%20glazes.htm

 

I've followed his recipes with good results at Cone 6; some of my handbuilding students used them for raku firings and were pleased.

 

Thank you for your reply. :)

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