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Printing Decals?

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I have purchased decal paper from ceramic supply. The instructions say to only use an hp black only printer. Does anyone have success using any other type of printers or copiers? My friend with the hp printer moved away.

I am firing onto ^06 glaze ware, then decal firing at^010.

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I have purchased decal paper from ceramic supply. The instructions say to only use an hp black only printer. Does anyone have success using any other type of printers or copiers? My friend with the hp printer moved away.

I am firing onto ^06 glaze ware, then decal firing at^010.

 

 

I have heard of other printers. However it isn't the brand of LASER printer that is the key but rather the TONER that the printer is using. To find out the details of the toner(you are interested in) Google the MSDS details of the black toner for the brand and model of the printer that you are considering. The toner must have a minimum of 40% iron oxide in its composition as the decals rely on the unfluxed iron oxide as the colorant. Having said that, the PRINTER must also only be a B&W LASER as the drum on a colour laser printer heats up to much and fuses the iron oxide on to the surface of the drum and then you will have a big repair bill. Today most black toners for laser printers are composed of carbon/soot which of course will burn out in firing.

 

B&W HP laser printers are around $100 or less. You just need the base model but do check out the toner details.

 

If you go back through the archives and search for laser decals you will find that this topic has been discussed at great length.

 

Johanna

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I have purchased decal paper from ceramic supply. The instructions say to only use an hp black only printer. Does anyone have success using any other type of printers or copiers? My friend with the hp printer moved away.

I am firing onto ^06 glaze ware, then decal firing at^010.

 

 

I agree about the printer with Iron Oxide. I've printed many decals using my old Dell Printer.

I'm responding because I want to let you know IF you buy an old printer be sure you can get drivers for it to work with your computer. My old Dell printer does not have drivers that work with my new computer that runs Vista. I kept my old laptop what runs XP on it and has the old Dell printer drivers just to printer decals!. I've contacted Dell and they said they have no intentions of creating drivers for such an old printer to work with Vista OS. You still can print w/o the correct drivers, you just can't change preferences and make it darker, etc.

 

Decals are fun. Good luck.

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I have an hp laserjet 1012 that worked great for printing decals when I bought it. It cost me less then a 100 used on ebay. But like the psot oabove says its the iron oxide in th toner that matters.

 

Since I purchased the printer the original cartridge ran out of toner and I did not want to spend the money to buy an HP brand replacement. I've tried recycled cartridges paying attention to the iron oxide content of the toner and I've also tried punching a hole in the end of the cartridge where the manufacture refills the toner and pouring in my own toner mix.

 

The last place I purchased the toner from was a website called Ink-Refills-Ink.com (at least that is what the bottle next to me says on it). I don't remember where I got the recycled cartridges but the same site might have them. The toner refills were very cheap relative to a new cartridge and I can refill a cartridge 4 or 5 times before the roller starts to wear down and I buy a new/recycled one.

 

I’ve tried mixing my own iron oxide with the toner - just pour out the toner and mix it with well sieved iron oxide - to increase the percent of iron oxide and had good results too.

 

-Steve

 

Attached is a picture of the cartridge with the plastic end removed so you can access the toner refill area if you try that route.

post-6122-13073707045609_thumb.jpg

post-6122-13073707045609_thumb.jpg

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I have an hp laserjet 1012 that worked great for printing decals when I bought it. It cost me less then a 100 used on ebay. But like the psot oabove says its the iron oxide in th toner that matters.

 

Since I purchased the printer the original cartridge ran out of toner and I did not want to spend the money to buy an HP brand replacement. I've tried recycled cartridges paying attention to the iron oxide content of the toner and I've also tried punching a hole in the end of the cartridge where the manufacture refills the toner and pouring in my own toner mix.

 

The last place I purchased the toner from was a website called Ink-Refills-Ink.com (at least that is what the bottle next to me says on it). I don't remember where I got the recycled cartridges but the same site might have them. The toner refills were very cheap relative to a new cartridge and I can refill a cartridge 4 or 5 times before the roller starts to wear down and I buy a new/recycled one.

 

I’ve tried mixing my own iron oxide with the toner - just pour out the toner and mix it with well sieved iron oxide - to increase the percent of iron oxide and had good results too.

 

-Steve

 

Attached is a picture of the cartridge with the plastic end removed so you can access the toner refill area if you try that route.

 

 

Hi Steven

Thank you for reminding me about the refilling of toner cartridges. I haven't quite gone down that track myself yet but in the past I have come across a number of you tube videos demonstrating how to do this. I Googled "youtube refilling Hp toner cartridges" and came up with instructional videos for a myriad of HP models. I am sure that there would be the same for other models. I successfully use a HP P1005 laser printer which was the bottom of the range printer at that time.

 

I am grateful that you shared your info about adding extra iron oxide to the cartridge. Food for thought.

 

Johanna

 

 

 

 

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I have read that the toner you need is MICR toner.  This is check printing toner which requires iron in it so check readers can read the info.

Toner cartridges 85A and 12A work.  

You can find good resources here:  http://rothshank.com/justins-work/decal-resources/

 

My questions:

I currently do not have my own kiln and work at school near my home.  They only fire to cone 6.  They never do any lower temperature firings.  So I am wondering if anyone has done any work with the laser printed decals at cone 6.

If you have fired them at cone 6, did you apply the decal on bisque and apply glaze over it?  Or did you apply decal over glaze?

What brand/type of decal paper did you use?

Have you tried the decals on cone 6 porcelain?  (Like Laguna Frost).  

I am going to try experimenting with applying to leather hard cone 6 porcelain.  Has anyone tried this?  

 

Thanks 

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Plumcreative, do they do a bisque firing? If so just make and glaze your piece as you normally would for cone 6 glaze firing AFTER the piece is completed with glaze firing add your decals and THEN put it back in with the next load of bisque. That's what I do if I don't have enough for a whole load of transfers. I bisque fire to 04 but if I have a whole load of transfers I fire to 05.

 

T

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Oh! I assumed but maybe shouldn't have that you are going to be using Laser Transfers that you print yourself with an HP printer. The commercial color decals you can buy I have never used but think they fire to a much lower temperature.

I use a couple of different HP printers with 2 different numbered toner cartridges. The thing to check is the MSDS sheet for your printers toner cartridge and look for iron, ferrous, etc to be as high as possible. I get my paper from decal paper.com and buy as big a lot as I can afford since it gets cheaper the more you purchase. To start buy just a few sheets. When you print make sure your image is high contrast black and white and print in the best setting AND this is important print ONE sheet at a time and let the printer cool down in between sheets. You will feel the warmth of the paper when you pull it out and if you print several at once you risk melting the sheet to your printer head. Since the paper is expensive I squeeze every square inch full when I print so as not to waste any.

Laser transfers will only get you a dark chocolate brown when you fire not pure black. I use this as part of the design feature when I print mine. If when you fire your transfer images come out really light lower the temperature you are firing to. OR try it on a different glaze or different shelf in the kiln. It takes some playing to find the right combination. I have successfully re applied and re fired transfers that were too light so it is possible to rescue a piece if it doesn't work the first time.

 

I hope this all helps.

 

T

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