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Crackle Slips For Greenware Or Bisque Cone 6,7,8


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#1 cambriapottery

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Posted 07 May 2011 - 12:44 PM

have become interested in producing some texture on surface of pots using crackle slip. I need a starting point to jump off from so anyone have some suggestions about recipes and applications?

#2 Chris Campbell

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Posted 07 May 2011 - 05:06 PM

How are you planning on firing them?
What temp? What type of kiln?
You also have options of crackle glazes and lichen type glazes.

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#3 Natas Setiabudhi

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Posted 09 May 2011 - 09:28 AM

correct me if i was wrong. i think crackle is terminology in glazes not slip. crackle or crazing may be define as glazes who tendency to craze is used for decorative effect.
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#4 Chris Campbell

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Posted 09 May 2011 - 10:27 AM

Not wrong ... but the effect can be produced in more ways than just glazes.

Some people are now using slips to get crackle effects in raku firings.
The slip falls off and you are left with black crackles on the white clay body.

You can also use some wax resists to get a crackle type effect ... as it shrinks it leaves channels for color application.

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#5 cambriapottery

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Posted 09 May 2011 - 10:39 AM

How are you planning on firing them?
What temp? What type of kiln?
You also have options of crackle glazes and lichen type glazes.


If you have a copy of 500 pitchers there are two examples of the surfaces I would like to begin with. John Arnold Taylor`s jug has a description that he uses slips stains and oxides as well as glaze. But I think he starts with the crackle slip on greenware or bisque for the initial texture. In the same book there is a piece from Dan Anderson which seems to be fired much lower. I am firing electric in cone 6, 7, 8 range. Sometimes I have possibility to fire with wood at a higher temperature cone 10ish. Application is my question and consistency and recipes for the slip(s).

#6 Chris Campbell

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Posted 09 May 2011 - 08:18 PM

Sorry, I don't have that book. If you can post images it would help.
There are just too many ways of doing crackle to be able to guess what was done.

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#7 LawPots

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 06:15 AM

I have a similar question; is the surface on the pots like these?

http://www.rob-barna...whiteBowls1_pop

#8 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 09:23 AM

I have worked with crawling glazes which can be made with additions of magnesium carbonate. The amount directly affects the texture and patterns.
Maybe you should see what happens by adding Magnesium to the slips?


Marcia



#9 cambriapottery

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 11:58 AM

I have a similar question; is the surface on the pots like these?

http://www.rob-barna...whiteBowls1_pop


It has some resemblance. Here is the site for John Arnold Taylor which shows the somewhat more subdued surface he is using. http://www.johnarnol...6&AKey=4J924LSX
But the bowls you have shown are interesting.
Thanks any more info you have collected? I have been reading what can promote crackle surface from Robin Hopper`s books and including reticulated glazes and black slips (underneath the glaze). Also very interesting. John Brit also has crackle slip in his publication on high fire glazes (page 62).

#10 cambriapottery

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 12:01 PM

I have worked with crawling glazes which can be made with additions of magnesium carbonate. The amount directly affects the texture and patterns.
Maybe you should see what happens by adding Magnesium to the slips?


Marcia



Yes thanks for this post Marcia. I plan to try this suggestion.

#11 cambriapottery

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 12:14 PM

Sorry, I don't have that book. If you can post images it would help.
There are just too many ways of doing crackle to be able to guess what was done.


To show an image from John II can only direct you to his webpage. It is used on his tableware and especially on the cups and jugs.
http://www.johnarnol...6&AKey=4J924LSX

#12 LawPots

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Posted 13 May 2011 - 07:21 AM


I have a similar question; is the surface on the pots like these?

http://www.rob-barna...whiteBowls1_pop


It has some resemblance. Here is the site for John Arnold Taylor which shows the somewhat more subdued surface he is using. http://www.johnarnol...6&AKey=4J924LSX
But the bowls you have shown are interesting.
Thanks any more info you have collected? I have been reading what can promote crackle surface from Robin Hopper`s books and including reticulated glazes and black slips (underneath the glaze). Also very interesting. John Brit also has crackle slip in his publication on high fire glazes (page 62).


I'm pretty much a beginner. My teacher recommended that I try firing to bisque twice, with slip applied after the first firing. It should cause the slip to shrink over the already partially vitrified clay and therefore crackle. It might also leap off the pot or flake off. I've not tried it yet. In theory, mismatched clay body to a slip which shrinks more than the body should do that as well. Really only one way to find out . . . try something and see.

#13 cambriapottery

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Posted 14 May 2011 - 11:23 AM



I have a similar question; is the surface on the pots like these?

http://www.rob-barna...whiteBowls1_pop


It has some resemblance. Here is the site for John Arnold Taylor which shows the somewhat more subdued surface he is using. http://www.johnarnol...6&AKey=4J924LSX
But the bowls you have shown are interesting.
Thanks any more info you have collected? I have been reading what can promote crackle surface from Robin Hopper`s books and including reticulated glazes and black slips (underneath the glaze). Also very interesting. John Brit also has crackle slip in his publication on high fire glazes (page 62).


I'm pretty much a beginner. My teacher recommended that I try firing to bisque twice, with slip applied after the first firing. It should cause the slip to shrink over the already partially vitrified clay and therefore crackle. It might also leap off the pot or flake off. I've not tried it yet. In theory, mismatched clay body to a slip which shrinks more than the body should do that as well. Really only one way to find out . . . try something and see.



Thanks Lawpots. I am going to try some of the different possibilities asap it all takes time. Please let me know if you discover anything along your path. Did you produce those bowls pictured?




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