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Found 14 results

  1. "I'll Drink to That" A National Exhibition of Drinking Vessels This show opens with a reception for the artists on Friday, August 4, from 6 to 8 pm. It remains on view, Thursday to Sunday, from 10 am through 5pm, through August 27. The premise of the special exhibition is to underscore the aesthetics and diversity of high end ceramic artists creating functional but exquisite objects. More than twenty-five ceramic artists from as far away as Oregon and Arizona as well as local and regional potters will exhibit. Ceremonial tea bowls, wine cups, whisky cups, juice cups, steins, chowder mugs and more will be available for purchase. A variety of clays, techniques, glazes and firing processes will be represented. During the busy summer season there is a lot of tourism in the community drawn by proximity to MASS MoCA, The Clark Art Institute, Williams College Museum of Art and the Berkshire Artists Museum. Eclipse Mill Gallery 243 Union St. North Adams, MA 01247
  2. Mountain Tumbler and Eucalyptus Platter

    From the album Pottery 2016

    © Giselle No. 5 Ceramics 2016, all rights reserved

  3. Slate Blue Carved Mountain Tumbler

    From the album Pottery 2016

    Thrown on the pottery wheel in white stoneware, carved deeply with mountain design. Treated with 2-1 water and iron oxide mix on only the mountains. One coat Mayco's Stoned Denim on mountains, four coats on everything else. Fired at ^6 in an electric kiln.

    © Giselle No. 5 Ceramics 2016, all rights reserved

  4. Slate Blue Carved Mountain Tumbler

    From the album Pottery 2016

    Thrown on the pottery wheel in white stoneware, carved deeply with mountain design. Treated with 2-1 water and iron oxide mix on only the mountains. One coat Mayco's Stoned Denim on mountains, four coats on everything else. Fired at ^6.

    © Giselle No. 5 Ceramics 2016, all rights reserved

  5. Plum Carved Mountain Mugs

    From the album Pottery 2016

    Thrown on the pottery wheel in white stoneware, carved deeply with mountain design. Treated with 2-1 water and iron oxide mix on only the mountains. One coat Amaco's Smoky Merlot on mountains, four coats on everything else. Fired at ^6.

    © Giselle No. 5 Ceramics 2016, all rights reserved

  6. Plum Carved Mountain Tumblers

    From the album Pottery 2016

    Thrown on the pottery wheel in white stoneware, carved deeply with mountain design. Treated with 2-1 water and iron oxide mix on only the mountains. One coat Amaco's Smoky Merlot on mountains, four coats on everything else. Fired at ^6.

    © Giselle No. 5 Ceramics 2016, all rights reserved

  7. Yunomi with combed blue and green slips

    From the album newer work

    This yunomi was dipped in both green and blue slips and then quickly combed to expose both. It may be excessively bright, but I like it because it's lively. Same white satin glaze.
  8. Yunomi with multiple slips

    From the album newer work

    This is probably my favorite piece from the last firing. The yunomi was sprayed with a vitreous green slip and then a more refractory lavender slip. It was glazed in my current favorite glaze, a titanium satin matte. Somehow this treatment resulted in a soft gray with tiny flecks of many colors, green, blue, lavender... and with a mysterious pink flush on one side.
  9. Granite Yunomis

    From the album newer work

    These have no actual granite in them, but the glaze has a granite-like quality, with green specks on a blue background, a smooth matte surface, and a micaceous sparkle in the sun.
  10. Celadon Yunomis

    From the album newer work

  11. Pale green ash-glazed yunomis

    From the album newer work

    These porcelain yunomis are fluted and glazed with a pale green ash glaze on the exterior, and a clear glaze on the interior, overlaid with ash glaze a distance down from the rim.
  12. Wood fired stoneware with shino glaze

    From the album Wood Fired

    This cup was side fired on shells, the ash build up ran nicely down the finger grooves.
  13. From the album John Baymore's Clay Work

    Yunomi thrown from clay with massive amounts of local NH granite dust and stone mixed in. Almost more stone than clay. Fired many multiple times in my woodfired noborigama to get the rocks to melt sufficiently. Included wooden stoage box. Sold at one of my solo exhibitions at an asian art gallery in the US. Now in the personal collection of the executive director of a US art museum.

    © John Baymore -all rights reserved

  14. I love making Yunomi's. I don't call them that, I call them cups. But the shape is the same idea, a tallish cup form with a trimmed foot. Anyway, I love sitting down and throwing tons of them off the hump. I also love trimming them. There seems to be something pure about this particular shape and I enjoy it immensely. My problem is this: people in Minnesota don't know what to do with it. They know what a mug is and will buy one blind. But it's like having to pull teeth to get people interested in cups. I use a cup WAY more than a mug. Yet I find that most people enjoy their glassware and don't intend to include any ceramics with their cold drink lineup. It seems like only coffee, tea, and hot cocoa can be drunk from a ceramic vessel. Anything cold like soda, milk, juice, or water, ceramic cups tend to fall by the wayside to glass. I have thought awhile on this and believe it may have something to do with people wanting very SPECIFIC uses for things--too general and people don't really want it. Think about all the one hit wonders like French butter dishes, apple bakers, ring keepers, etc. The general public seems to adore these things. But you show them a cup and they are like, what the *ell do I use this for? Perhaps the ingenuity of potters is biting me in the butt? Does anyone else experience this? I am an educator at heart so I am always trying to teach people pottery things but no one seems to like ceramic yunomis/cups. It is always disheartening how many cups I have leftover from a sale. All my mugs go really fast, but I'm lucky to sell a few cups. PS - this does not include the cup form that is similar to glassware, like something that I might call a "dinner cup." I am specifically talking about the traditional yunomi form. I will post a picture too so there is no confusion
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