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Found 117 results

  1. Wondering if anyone has experienced peeling of underglazes and/or colored slip when firing with raku clear glaze. One experienced potter suggesrwd adding EPK kaolin...Any similar experience out there?
  2. Hi folks, Today I was working on the Wedding Jar that I had made for a nephew, and was trying to accent their lettering for names and dates. I had stamped these in, but it was not quite clear so I cleaned them up and added a stain over top thinking to do a little mishima to bring the letters up. However, due to the curved surface I lost some of the letter forms. What to do. I used a small brush after engraving the missing areas to flow the glaze in, and that worked. At the same time I decided to use the brush with a white engobe to accent the flowers of the mountain laurel I had stamped into the form. My tip for the day though is much simpler. I had problems with getting the right amount of slip or stain on to the fine bristled brush. I tried a lot of different techniques and then tried to dip a sponge brush into the container of slip or stain and lay it over the top of the container loading the brush up from that. It worked perfectly with just the right amount of stain or slip to work into the brush and keep the fine work when painting on the pot. I was an art teacher, working with a lot of media, especially watercolor, acrylic, and inks. This technique I had never heard of, but it would work well with almost any media to keep from overloading a brush. So. . .. do any of you have some technique that would work well with the use of stains, underglazes, glazes, even if brushing, spraying, or other technique? Post it here, it would be great to hear from you. best, Pres
  3. PamelaLBL

    Raku with underglaze

    Has anybody used underglazes under a clear crackle Raku?
  4. Hi everyone, A question. Can anyone see a problem with not glazing over underglaze for non food works? I have looked but can't find an answer anywhere and it seems that everyone uses a glaze over the top for the underglazes. I'm using porcelain clay to make wearable works including rings (I should add). I love the results, and the undergalzes adhere very well to the porcelain. I can even wet sand after the final fire and the design stays put. The colours appear somewhat softer but that is good too. I belive that the newer underglazes have more frit in them making them a litle more like a glaze themselves and this is why they work differntly to older style glazes.? Any issues? I can do it but is it a bad idea as far as safely goes? cheers Lilly aka etched
  5. I have tried using underglazes and wiping them off to enhance textures on both bisqued and non-bisqued pieces. When I try to "wipe them off," a lot of color has already soaked into the raised areas of clay; or if I try being more precise about where I put the underglaze and then wipe it off, it still spreads onto and stains the other areas as I wipe. When I see pics of others' work in progress, it appears that their pieces have been wiped clean except for the textures. Do I just live with this or am I missing something in technique. Thanks for any help
  6. I had a collaborative project with a friend. I made the trays, she applied the black underglaze and did the sgraffito work. I bisqued the pieces to 04 and sprayed them with clear. All of the pieces came out with a white speckling and slight pitting. I have not noticed this effect on my other work with underglaze and clear. But I do not normally use large expanses of black. Does anyone have any thoughts or suggestions? We would love to do more of this work. Roberta
  7. Hi all, I've been starting to have a crawling issue with 3 of my last firings and can't figure out what's happening here (see photo). All color underneath the clear ^5 glaze is Amaco Velvet. I give 3 good layers for the underglaze every time, and have not changed the technique for painting. Glaze and clay body also remain the same. Upon suggestion from a friend I tried doing the firing SLOW, but that didn't help either. Couple of questions for you Amaco veterans: 1. Have you had issue with the crawling happening over Velvet? How did you resolve it? 2. Even in small coverage areas, the glaze is up higher where there is no underglaze, and lower where there is. A bit lost on what to do about this new strange issues.
  8. Wanting to make an Amaco underglaze have just a little bit of shiny-ness, but not cover it with a clear glaze. Have made some cups with a lot of exterior surface texture. Will be using a liner glaze on the interior as well as over the rim and down about 3/4" inch on the exterior. Planned to paint the underglaze in the textured area and then wipe off, leaving material in the recesses. Firing to Cone 6. Wondering if adding a small amount of either Gerstley Borate or Nepheline Syenite to the underglaze would do the trick? Or a Frit? Thanks for any suggestions.
  9. Help! I am having issues with underglazes disappearing in spots during glaze firings. I paint the underglazes (usually Duncan or Speedball) onto greenware and fire in a bisque kiln to cone 06. Then I dip my pieces in a clear glaze and fire to cone 6. When the pieces come out of the bisque firing, they are totally fine. After the glaze firing however, some pieces will have small round spots that look like the clear glaze and colored underglaze just JUMPED right off the pot. All my pieces are wiped down before applying the clear glaze, and as I already stated, they look perfect after the first firing.. I have had this happen on the inside of bowls, as well as the outside. Why would this be happening? Thanks in advance!
  10. Hi peps, I have an unfired stoneware planter that needs to be decorated. However my painting skills leave much to be desired. Because I don't have any spraying tools I will have to rely on using brushes. How can I achieve an even coat?
  11. Hello! I am very very new to ceramics and I have used a low fire underglaze to paint my pieces. They were Bisque fired and came out a bit glossy which signaled my instructor that I did something wrong and used low fire underglazes. I want to finish my pieces but I was told that they may get messed up after I glaze them. I wanted to use a clear glaze to make them food safe. Is this still possible? They are detailed pieces and I would hate to lose their designs. I used brown clay, and I was told that they have to fire the glaze at high temperatures. I am sorry I dont know alot so Im sorry if i got anything wrong. Thank you!
  12. I started pottery a bit over a year ago and recently begun exploring decorative techniques. I tried some underglaze inlay on a greenware piece, carving out decorative lines on a small waxed porcelain cup, then painting the whole thing with blue underglaze, and wiping off the excess underglaze. I bisque fired the piece, then dipped it in transparent glaze and fired it again. The final cup has streaky underglaze, I don't understand why since the underglaze was bisque fired before I applied the final glaze? (I'll attach a picture, please note it's just a test piece I do notice however that the streaking seems to occur on those lines that were less deep (the straight lines were carved a bit deeper into the clay, might that be the solution? - I thought mishima could be fairly superficial, am I wrong?) Should I try to sponge on the clear glaze instead of dipping? Also, I find that dipping gives me a bit of a thick final transparent coating, could I try and brush it on in order to obtain a thinner coating or am I just setting myself up for a huge mess? I'd very much appreciate some experienced insight on this! Many Thanks in advance! SaveSave
  13. firenflux

    Green geometric cup

    From the album: Favorites

    I love all the varied shapes a good mug comes in. The shape is my current favorite. It works well to separate the textured areas from the geometric sgraffito in the bottom. It has a pulled handle and commercial glazes and was fired to cone 6 electric.
  14. So I recently bought a kiln and don't know a lot about how glazes work - will figure it out as I go along. Just had a question. How is the effect in the attached teapot achieved? Can I dip bisqueware in white and then paint on top of it with underglaze and then fire? How else would I be able to achieve a white base with painted pattern on top? Appreciate any advice.
  15. Cavy Fire Studios

    Mr. Shrike's Head

    From the album: 2017 Stuff

    The final result of my first animal head sculpture. I'm quite pleased with how this turned out--as you can imagine, I was sweating when this piece was in the kiln!! My fella, its intended and current owner, was extremely happy when he got it for Christmas. <3 Sculpted from Clay Art Center (of Tacoma)'s Xtra White lowfire earthenware, painted with Amaco, Mayco, Duncan, and Clay Art Center underglaze, fired to ^03.

    © Me and my fella

  16. I make clay statues but the piece I'm needing help with is a poured greenware piece from a ceramics studio. I have an unfired daschund that i want to make look like a blue merle one. You can see examples of blue merle dogs in border collies and a few other breeds,if you care to look at one so you'll know what I'm talking about. They are sort of grey with color splotches and hair striping. The only underglaze I've ever used on this type of material is a 3-coat painted on type. Would it work to do 2 layers in grey with spotches and then top coat it with single-stroke underglaze the hairs? Or would there be an easier method? Since I'm going to clear glaze on top would it be better to use single-stroke for white or cut through the bottom layers down to the greenware? Any ideas or product recommendations? I've never tried doing something like this before.
  17. Hi all. Can anyone please recommend some food safe, high fire, clear matte/satin glazes? I'll be using it over fired underglaze on slipcast mugs I'm working on. Amaco recommended their SM-10 (https://www.amaco.com/products/glaze-sm-10-clear?ref=2&taxon_id=284) to me, so I'm going to try that out. But I'd like to see what other people are using as well. They can be dippable, sprayable, brushable - anything. I just want to test some different products to find what I like best. Also, I understand that the matte/satin clears aren't entirely crystal clear in the way that gloss clears are, but how much of a difference is there? I'm relatively new to ceramics so any info will be helpful. Thanks!
  18. Celia UK

    Small seed head Bowl

    From the album: Playing with mud 2016

    White earthenware bowl. Carved when leather hard. Grey underglaze painted into lines and scraped back to neaten. Transparent glaze.
  19. From the album: Monoprinting with plaster

    Tile I made using a plaster slab, underglazes and porcelain casting slip, learned technique in Andrew Wandless' book 'Image Transfer on Clay' and also Joanne Veevers on CAD. This is still in greenware stage, not entirely sure how all of those colors will look as bisque and then glazed
  20. ChenowethArts

    House Wine 2

    From the album: Forum Discussion Images

    This is the second "House Wine" vessel that I made. This time, underglaze transfers were added in an effort to build more depth to the surface. These are fun to make but seem to require a good bit of time on the workbench. This one is headed for a November show.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA. All right reserved.

  21. ChenowethArts

    House Wine 2 - Lid Close-up

    From the album: Forum Discussion Images

    This is a close-up of the lid/stopper for the "House Wine" vessel. I like sneaking in some detail work on areas that don't show when the top is in place.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA. All right reserved.

  22. ChenowethArts

    House on the House - Image transfer detail

    From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    Handbuilt stoneware mugs, approximately 12oz capacity, fired cone10. Surface treatment includes 3-d dwelling, carved-out hillside community, and underglaze image transfers. The transfers are new to me...using a CriCut Explore to create silkscreen masks through which thickened underglaze is printed onto rice paper. Once dried, the surface of the mug is coated in underglaze, the transfer is sprayed until saturated, and then pressed/burnished (with pint side to the mug) onto the bisque fired surface. I'm not yet comfortable enough with this technique to try it on greenware but it should work equally well. Certainly there is a story to these mugs...the short version centers around work in some of the poorest slums in Central/South America in contrast with visits to numerous iconic cites in Europe.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

  23. ChenowethArts

    Keyboard Mug - Note Handle

    From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    This is a 14oz-16oz wheel-thrown, stoneware mug with slab-built (black only) keys attached to a carved/altered keyboard design. The handle idea is NOT original but borrowed/copied/altered from another artist's project. When I find the name, I will certainly give proper attribution. Interior is glazed with Woo's Blue. Exterior details are black and white, brushed-on, Amaco Velvet underglazes with a top coating of clear. This is a concept mug for a commissioned gift project that is currently underway. The basic form and structure may remain the same but the color scheme for the actual project will be altered considerably.

    © Copyright 2017 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  24. ChenowethArts

    House on the House - Image transfer detail

    From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    Handbuilt stoneware mug, approximately 12oz capacity, fired cone10. Surface treatment includes 3-d dwelling, carved-out hillside community, and underglaze image transfers. The transfers are new to me...using a CriCut Explore to create silkscreen masks through which thickened underglaze is printed onto rice paper. Once dried, the surface of the mug is coated in underglaze, the transfer is sprayed until saturated, and then pressed/burnished (with pint side to the mug) onto the bisque fired surface. I'm not yet comfortable enough with this technique to try it on greenware but it should work equally well. Certainly there is a story to these mugs...the short version centers around work in some of the poorest slums in Central/South America in contrast with visits to numerous iconic cites in Europe.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

  25. ChenowethArts

    House on the House...

    From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    Handbuilt stoneware mugs, approximately 12oz capacity, fired cone10. Surface treatment includes 3-d dwelling, carved-out hillside community, and underglaze image transfers. The transfers are new to me...using a CriCut Explore to create silkscreen masks through which thickened underglaze is printed onto rice paper. Once dried, the surface of the mug is coated in underglaze, the transfer is sprayed until saturated, and then pressed/burnished (with pint side to the mug) onto the bisque fired surface. I'm not yet comfortable enough with this technique to try it on greenware but it should work equally well. Certainly there is a story to these mugs...the short version centers around work in some of the poorest slums in Central/South America in contrast with visits to numerous iconic cites in Europe.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

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