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  1. Tea Bowls: Form Function & Beauty www.pocosinarts.org Explore the processes and aesthetics of making winter and summer tea bowls for Tea Ceremony. Learn about the architecture of tea bowls, the art of trimming tea bowl feet including: aesthetics, proportions, preparing clay bodies, wheel, hand forming and carving methods, throwing off the mound to achieve fluid tea bowl forms. ALL LEVELS some clay experience handy Session runs October 4 – 7, 2018 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. daily, open studio hours on select days. $375 tuition + $35 registration fee Artist Bio: KRISTIN MULLER is a studio artist who began her study of Chawan making with Peter Callas and Takao Okazaki in 1994. She purchased Okazaki’s studio and anagama kiln in 2000 and completed an MFA thesis focused on Tea Bowl forming and firing techniques in 2014. Kristin is also the Executive Director of Peters Valley School of Craft, adjunct faculty at Hood College, author of The Potter’s Studio Handbook: A Guide to Hand Built and Wheel-Thrown Ceramics and co-author of Making Good: An Inspirational Guide to Being an Artist Craftsman. www.Kristinmuller.com $410
  2. Week 33 Although raku ware was guided to fame in ________ by Sen-no Rikyu - because it was favored by him for use in the tea ceremony – the raku ware itself was originated by Chojiro, the son of a Korean tile maker. Toono Gujo-Hachiman Kyoto Hirosaki For centuries the tea ceremony, called _______________ (hot water for tea), has been responsible for creating an appreciation and understanding of raku pottery. Usa-Cha Cha-No-Yu Koicha Kaiseki Clay for raku must mature chemically at or above ______________.; contain enough course or refractory material – such as grog, sand, volcanic ash, pumice, talc, or alumina – to withstand the thermal shock; respond well to the technique of forming; and successfully survive the firing. 19150F. 21000F. 12000 F. 16000F. History and legend indicate that ______________ glazed pottery may have contributed to the decline of Roman aristocracy, and the eventual fall of the Roman empire.. . . . .also thought to be a source of disease or disability among the segment of the Mexican poor who use such potter. stoneware frit lead zinc This weeks questions come from Raku Pottery, by Robert Pipenburg, c.1972, Collier Books, a division of Macmillan Publishing Co. Note from Pres:This is one of my older books, as I purchased it when I was taking Ceramics in undergrad at Penn State. We were studying raku at the time. No points for getting J. Baymore to help you out with the answers. Answers: 3. Kyoto-Although raku ware was guided to fame in Kyoto by Sen-no Rikyu - because it was favored by him for use in the tea ceremony - the raku ware itself was originated by Chojiro, the son of a Korean tile maker. During the 1520s Chojiro settled in Kyoto, and took the title Sokei after marrying into a Japanese family, and became naturalized. Rikyu became so fond of Chojiro that he honored him by giving him his father's name of Tanaka. 2. Cha-No-Yu-The Tea Ceremony, like raku, is almost synonymous with Japan. For centuries the tea ceremony, called Cha-No—Yu (hot water for tea), has been responsible for creating an appreciation and understanding of raku pottery. The tea ceremony used raku tea bowls because they symbolized the beauty, the simple and unassuming qualities, that were in harmony with everyday life. 4. 16000 F.-Clay for use in raku can be found almost anywhere. The only require- ments are that the clay must mature chemically at or above 1600° F.; contain enough coarse or refractory material - such as grog, sand, volcanic ash, pumice, talc, or alumina - to withstand the thermal shock; respond well to the technique of forming; and successfully survive the firing. 3 .lead-History and legend indicate that lead-glazed pottery may have contributed to the decline of Roman aristocracy, and the eventual fall of the Roman Empire. Wine stored in lead-glazed vessels or drunk from lead- glazed cups could have carried lead particles. The ingesting of these lead particles may have caused sterility as a result of chronic lead poisoning. The lead-glazed Mexican pottery of today is thought to be a source of disease or disability among the segment of the Mexican poor who use it. Reports from many countries throughout the world implicate lead as a poisoning agent that can cause serious illness, especially among children.
  3. Guest

    "Ode to Jurakudai"

    From the album: John Baymore's Clay Work

    Ido-style Chawan. Wood fired and electric fired. Granite bearing stoneware body. American Shino glaze on exterior (with finger wipes), semi-matte feldspathic glaze on interior. Gold luster on interior. Exhibited In "Chawan for Chanoyu" solo exhibition held in conjunction with the 2015 Providence NCECA conference.

    © 2015 John Baymore -all rights reserved

  4. From the album: John Baymore's Clay Work

    Thrown; yakishime; youhen charcoal finish; noborigama woodfired at Kanayamayaki, Goshogawara-shi, Aomori-ken, Japan; Orton cone 14. Private collection in Japan.

    © John Baymore 2013 - all rights reserved

  5. From the album: John Baymore's Clay Work

    Thrown; noborigama woodfired; Orton cone 12; American Shino glaze. In the Tsinghua University collection in Beijing.

    © John Baymore 2011 - all rights reserved

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