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    • Jennifer Harnetty

      Moderators needed!   12/08/2017

      Ceramic Arts Network is looking for two new forum moderators for the Clay and Glaze Chemistry and Equipment Use and Repair sections of the Ceramic Arts Network Community Forum. We are looking for somebody who is an active participant (i.e. somebody who participates on a daily basis, or near daily) on the forum. Moderators must be willing to monitor the forum on a daily basis to remove spam, make sure members are adhering to the Forum Terms of Use, and make sure posts are in the appropriate categories. In addition to moderating their primary sections, Moderators must work as a team with other moderators to monitor the areas of the forum that do not have dedicated moderators (Educational Approaches and Resources, Aesthetic Approaches and Philosophy, etc.). Moderators must have a solid understanding of the area of the forum they are going to moderate (i.e. the Clay and Glaze Chemistry moderator must be somebody who mixes, tests, and has a decent understanding of materials). Moderators must be diplomatic communicators, be receptive to others’ ideas, and be able to see things from multiple perspectives. This is a volunteer position that comes with an honorary annual ICAN Gold membership. If you are interested, please send an email outlining your experience and qualifications to jharnetty@ceramics.org.

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  1. Week 26 In stoneware glazes, _____________ is often used as a matting agent giving some excellent opaque matt glazes. It is also very useful in helping to reduce crazing. calcium lime alkali zinc magnesia _______________ in glazes is due to the refraction and diffusion of light rays reflected from a surface that is minutely rough. Crystals Glossiness Mattness Durability A rust colored iron glaze-the rion oside crystals arte not visible to the naked eye. The name, _________, is Japanese for “persimmon”. Temmoku Tesha Shino Kaki The Mino area of Japan was responsible for four distinctive traditional styles of pottery, namely Oribe, Black Seto, Yellow Seto, and ___________ Temmoku Tesha Shino Kaki This weeks questions come from Stoneware Glazes, A Systematic Approach, by Ian Currie, c. 1985 second edition 1986, Bootstrap Pres, Queensland Australia. Note from Pres: I have had this book for many years, read it sporadically, as it is filled with many graphs and triaxial blend images that I have not understood until recently. It was written as a textbook, and is quite detailed in pursuit of the science of Stoneware glazes. Answers: 4. Magnesia-ln stoneware glazes, magnesia (Mg0) is often used as a matting agent, giving some excellent opaque malt glazes. It is also very useful in helping to reduce crazing, though the amount used is usually much less than the 0.5 M.P. used in the Magnesium Set here. Interesting color responses are achieved with cobalt and iron oxide pigments. In glazes fairly low in alumina and containing about 0.2 M.P. MgO, a pleasant speckle of pyroxene crystals is fairly easily produced. In an iron glaze, this gives the ‘teadust' effect. 3. Mattness-Mattness in glazes is due to the refraction and diffusion of light rays reflected from a surface that is minutely rough. This roughness may be caused by tiny crystals, undissolved materials, or by mechanical abrasion (e.g. sand blasting), or chemical corrosion (e.g. with hydrofluoric acid) or by bubble effects, or sometimes by minute crinkling of the glaze surface as it cools. 4. Kaki-Kaki - A rust colored iron glaze-the iron oxide crystals are not visible to the naked eye. The name is Japanese for ‘persimmon’. 3. Shino-Although I am primarily concerned here with Shino Ware,it is worth pointing out that the Mino area, where Shino Ware evolved, is also responsible for three other distinctive traditional styles of pottery, namely Oribe, Black Seto and Yellow Seto. The four styles are closely inter- related, and it is fascinating to see how the Mino potters of four hundred years ago created such a wide range of wares from such a narrow range of materials.
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