Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'slabs'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Ceramic Arts Daily Forums
    • Forum FAQ & Terms of Use
    • Studio Operations and Making Work
    • Clay and Glaze Chemistry
    • Equipment Use and Repair
    • Business, Marketing, and Accounting
    • Educational Approaches and Resources
    • Aesthetic Approaches and Philosophy
    • Int'l Ceramic Artists Network (ICAN) Operations and Benefits
    • Ceramic Events of Interest

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 4 results

  1. Having trouble drying handbuilt slabs of porcelain They are rather thin ( approx 1 & 1.5cm ) Have put them to dry sandwiched between two pieces of drywall And 80% have cracked in various places Any input would be GREATLY appreciated As is rather frustrating After so much trial and effort Luv Nicky
  2. Looking for some suggestions for the quickest/easiest way to make slabs for the jigger. At the moment we're slab rolling each one and then polishing the top with a rib, before flipping into the mould (shiny side down for a smooth bottom). This is working fine but is slow, recently I visited the Emma Bridgewater factory in Stoke and there the jigger jolly team had what I believe is a hydraulic mini jigger jolley with a flat blade and automatic water sprayer to make the slabs. The operator worked the two simultaneously, making a slab, replacing with new clay and transferring the slab to the jolley machine - this seemed to work well and was very quick. One option I have is to make a flat tool for my jigger machine with a plaster bat and make a batch of slabs before beginning jiggering, but my two worries are: a) how to keep the smooth surface as if it gets marked, it shows up on the plate's bottom and ruins the piece, and b) how to stop them drying out (if too dry they're very tricky to work with on the jigger and creases begin to form)? If anyone has any suggestions or knows of a place where I could get an automatic hydraulic jigger/jolley with an automatic water sprayer I would very much appreciate any suggestions.
  3. A customer is asking for a pizza stone.This is a large slab tile used in an oven to bake a pizza. The question; Is a bisque tile good enough or do you have to fire it to stoneware? Should it be porous, or should it be vitrified? Anyone make these babies? Not to be confused with the Rossetta stone, which is another animal altogether. TJR.
  4. I've always been a fan of texture when working with slabs, and I started hand-building to create more of an "organic" feel to my work. With slab rollers, the clay gets a canvas texture imprinted, and most people smooth it out. For me, sometimes I leave it, or I remove it and add a different texture, such as burlap or something non-organic. I was reading this (old) article today about Elephant Ceramics, and notice some of the comments from potters who said that her work looks "unfinished" because of the texture, and also that the edges of her work looks too sharp. I've always loved her work, and was curious what other serious potters thought of the texture (whether or not it was from a slab-roller, which I'm not sure if it was), and also of her style of work in general. Here's the link to the article: http://www.designsponge.com/2011/09/whats-in-your-toolbox-michele-michael.html
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.