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Found 2 results

  1. I've noticed a trend in marking pottery with an extremely small stamp with no other form of signature. Do people generally do this on dishware only or on more extensive sculptural work as well? I am curious how others prefer to mark their work. Do you sign with a needle tool? Use a chop or seal! Have a stamp made? What information do you try to convey? Some of the stamps I've seen used are so small and simple it wouldn't lend a clue for someone who bought it to remember the maker. Do you prefer a simple mark or something more identifiable? Do you use your name, a symbol or both? I know there are as many options as answers to these questions, but I am curious and I would love to see some examples. Clearly this is also somewhat pointed. I am not fully satisfied with my marking method and I am considering a custom stamp, or more immediately re-carving a soap stone signature chop I had fashioned myself for other purposes.
  2. Well, I bisque fired a small load of cone 6 bowls, and only one bottom blew off. So that one won't be a problem to sign, because with no bottom, signing is not an option. But, I'm wondering, how in heck will I sign my name on to the rest of the bowls? I could use a laundry marker, but....naw. How would a savvy potter sign a pot after bisqueing (is that even a word, doesn't look right) or even after firing to completion? I'm guessing you wouldn't use a glaze, as that would stick the pot to the shelf (I'm catching on). But how about a stain or a slip that has been modified to stick to bisque? Any thoughts. Thanks, john autry (Hershey8 is my dog...Woof!...he thanks you too.
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