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    • Jennifer Harnetty

      Moderators needed!   12/08/2017

      Ceramic Arts Network is looking for two new forum moderators for the Clay and Glaze Chemistry and Equipment Use and Repair sections of the Ceramic Arts Network Community Forum. We are looking for somebody who is an active participant (i.e. somebody who participates on a daily basis, or near daily) on the forum. Moderators must be willing to monitor the forum on a daily basis to remove spam, make sure members are adhering to the Forum Terms of Use, and make sure posts are in the appropriate categories. In addition to moderating their primary sections, Moderators must work as a team with other moderators to monitor the areas of the forum that do not have dedicated moderators (Educational Approaches and Resources, Aesthetic Approaches and Philosophy, etc.). Moderators must have a solid understanding of the area of the forum they are going to moderate (i.e. the Clay and Glaze Chemistry moderator must be somebody who mixes, tests, and has a decent understanding of materials). Moderators must be diplomatic communicators, be receptive to others’ ideas, and be able to see things from multiple perspectives. This is a volunteer position that comes with an honorary annual ICAN Gold membership. If you are interested, please send an email outlining your experience and qualifications to jharnetty@ceramics.org.

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Found 6 results

  1. Being a less-than-tall person, I bought an L&L 18" deep kiln - I couldn't reach the bottom of the 27â€ers. Kiln works great, tho I have to add degrees to the cone offset for 04 bisquing, and remove some from cone 6, ( according to my witness cones). Actually right now I’m using the cone 5 setting and that seems to get my 6 cone to the right spot. My e28s has 4 elements and 2 thermocouples, and this creates some challenges. I get even responses from my witness cones only if I fire with only 2 shelves. With 3 shelves in, the witness cones vary widely. I’ve tried every variation on shelf placement I can think of, including staggering and using 2 1/2 half shelves. The manufacturer says that you need 2 elements and 1 thermocouple per shelf, and I’m pretty sure I also read that the shelves should clear the elements. With my kiln , that means you can only have 2 shelves in, and when I follow these guidelines the kiln gods do favor me with matching witness cones. This has all turned out not to be a big problem for me anyway, because I haven’t had as much time as I’d hoped I would to be making stuff. Also running the kiln seems to cost me only about $10 a month for 3-4 firings. I expected the cost to be much higher. I'm making less at one time, but also getting more instant gratification, (instant being a relative term when applied to a slowly cooling kiln). Should I be less concerned about matching cones? I assume it's a matter of degree. It can be more than 1 cone. Also, I have been "lidding" the load with the 2 unused half shelves because I feel I should have them in there to increase the thermal mass, which is already 1/3 less than what the kiln could hold. Any thoughts on that? Thank you in advance for your advice and experience Irene in NJ
  2. Week 8 New quiz folks, another hodge podge of thought raising questions. All of the Earthenware clay bodies can be lumped into 3 arbitrary groups: pure earthenware, talc, and kaolin bodies fritted, grogged, and kaolin bodies pure earthenware, fritted, and talc bodies pure earthenware, kaolin, and fritted bodies As temperature decreases, flux increases, and ________________ decreases. Feldspar kaolin ball clay quartz The thinnest, and lightest of kiln shelves are made of a ____________________composition. high alumina cordierite nitride bonded silicon carbide ____________ glazes are used in a lot of studios to avoid throwing small bits of glazes down the drain Trash Raw Commercial Ash This weeks questions come from text in Electric Studio: Making and Firing, edited by Bill Jones, c. 2016, The American Ceramic Society Note from Pres: This is one of the newer books(paperback) in my library. If for nothing else, it has a large area on the use of , repair and firing of electric kilns. This includes sections on kiln furniture, repair and upkeep. Answers: c) pure earthenware, fritted, and talc bodies Pure earthenware clay-as mined it can contain varying amounts of flux and other impurities and it fires to whatever temperature its contaminants (sodium, potassium, iron, etc.) dictate. Fritted bodies think of it as porcelain (25 kaolin, 25 ball clay, 50 non-plastics) but with much of the non-plastics being frit and the frit often containing boron. Two subsets exist; one with lots of nepheline syenite as a flux source, another with whiting (calcium carbonate), which is problematic because its firing range is narrow. There are, of course, an infinite range of mixes of frits, feldspar, and nepheline syenite in this group. Talc bodies-similar to porcelain but they have use talc (magnesium aluminum silicate mineral) as the principal flux. Again, talc, frit, nepheline syenite, and feldspar are mixed in infinite variety to make low-fire clay bodies. The clearest example is 50 talc and 50 ball clay. Talc bodies have very little silicate glass, in fact they have very little silica and consequently they can be terribly weak better for figurines than for functional ware. (d) Quartz As firing temperature decreases, flux increases and quartz decreases. Natural Earthenware clay, as mined, contains all the sodium, potassium, iron and other fluxes necessary to fire to maturity without added materials. c) nitride bonded From an image caption. . . . The relative thickness of three 18x24-inch kiln shelves composed of different materials. The thickest(left), a 1-inch cordierite/high alumina shelf weighing 21 pounds; the next is a thinner but denser 3/4:-inch silicon carbide shelf that weighing 20 pounds; and the thinnest shelf, a 3/16-inch silicon carbide nitride bonded shelf weighing only 9 1/2 pounds! (a) Trash It’s a fairly common practice in large studios to make what’s called a “trash glaze†using the remaining bits of various shop glazes to avoid throwing glaze materials down the drain.
  3. January 2017, snowed in

    From the album WIPs

    Stuff piling up on my studio shelves while I wait for the snow to go away. Bleh.

    © Ann Nielsen

  4. I am looking to get an angle grinder for doing kiln shelves. There are a lot of different models out there, what should I look for so that I get one that will work for doing kiln shelves. Here are some of the things I have found I need to choose from (so far): Amps 7, 9, or 11 Weight of the tool 5-7 pounds 9,000-12,000 rpm Type of control switch... paddle seems to be preferred Disc sizes 41/2 or 7 Brand, I recognize quite a few and have always had good luck with DEWALT tools. Once I decide on the model to get I need to know what kind of grinding wheel I will need: General grinding wheel Masonry grinding wheel Diamond Grinding CUP Flat grinding wheel Etc So those of you that have one and use it to do kiln shelves any recommendations? Anything I am not considering? Thanks for your help. T
  5. I need to replace my broken kiln shelves and I wondered if I could cut vermiculite sheet to size and use this for the shelves (as would save me money). I now vermiculite can withstand high temp, but wondered if anyone had any experience with this. Thanks.
  6. I used to stack shelves where ever I could find a place to put them-which seemed to always be in the way in the shop. Being a small room, I just could never find a place out of the way to store them. I decided last year enough moving them around-I built a cart out of scrap materials from a deck build and added heavy wheels to the base. It works well in my situation as I can push it into a corner or some other area and have it out of the way, yet have it handy when I need to load or unload the kiln. It is also easy to get it to the work area for kiln washing or scraping. How do you store your shelves?
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