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Found 2 results

  1. I've got a bone dry bowl. Arctic white stoneware. It has thin walls and has been sitting for about a month. I also have a 'raven black' slip (description below). Is it possible for me to paint the pot with the slip, then paint patterns with shellac and wipe the black slip away, revealing the clay underneath? I'm unsure if the bowl will take the slip and whether it's possible to wipe the excess away, so I'm left with a black pattern. Ideas: These decorating slips, are suitable for use on both Earthernware and Stoneware bodies. When manufacturing our slips we believe in using high percentages of stain to give strong, vivid colours throughout the range. The slip can be applied to leather hard clay with brushes, sponges or slip trailers. After biscuit firing the pots should be glazed with a suitable transparent glaze which will further enhance the vibrant colours. Our sample is fired to 1060degC.The colours darken the higher you fire. Wide firing range - 1000-1300°C" Is it possible for me to paint the pot with the slip, then paint patterns with shellac and wipe the black slip
  2. Since there has not been a new question posted of late, I will ask one of my own. Do you resist in any way when working? Take it however you want in these times, but for me I will stick to using a resist when working with decoration or glazes on my pots. In the past I have used wax over glazes before spraying on more colors, used latex or shellac over leather hard clay before washing the pot with a sponge to carve a relief design, used wax on the bottom to protect bisqued areas from glaze for glaze firing, used paper resist to spray through designs, and used multiple layers of resist with spraying to create more complex designs. I have applied resist materials with a brush, a roller, fingers, aluminum foil, doilies, lace fabric, and other items. best, Pres
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