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Found 70 results

  1. Eleanor Anderson - July 26-30, 2019 - SKETCHING YOUR WAY INTO CLAY - $614.00 $614.00 Workshop Description: In this workshop, you will learn how to take pottery to the next level by focusing on surface design. We will learn how to carve, etch and stencil patterns, images and textures onto your pottery. Participants will learn Sgraffito, Mishima (Japanese Underglaze/ Slip Inlay) Stamping, monoprinting as well as water etching. We will do daily drawing exercises to come up with solutions for original and personal surfaces. This workshop is designed for students who have some experience with clay. Students are encouraged to prioritize process and risk taking, and will take home bisque wear designed to be fired at cone 6 oxidation. REGISTER HERE ALL LEVELS some clay experience handy Session runs January 26 - 30, 2019 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. daily, open studio hours on select days. Fee includes tuition + materials fee + studio fee. Students may be asked to bring some additional items. Materials include 25 lbs. of clay and 2 firings. Additional clay will be available for purchase. Artist Bio: Eleanor Anderson graduated from Colorado College, where she studied printmaking and fibers. She works across a broad range of media including ceramics, textiles, prints and collage. She has been a resident at the Textile Arts Center is Brooklyn, NY and the 9th Semester Fellow in Design at Colorado College. Most recently she finished a two year Core Fellowship at Penland School of Crafts in Penland, North Carolina. She sends work into the world with the optimistic intentions of enlivening and enriching objects and spaces for the user or the viewer. www.eleanoranderson.com www.eleanoranderson.com
  2. Hi There, I make work that is sgraffito carved, most of which I try to do when the piece is leather hard but sometimes it's a little drier than I'd like. I am very concerned about silicosis. In the last couple of years, I have been wearing my respirator when I carve. It's a msr mask with p100 filters. Recently I met another sgraffito artist who suggested that unless I am replacing those cartridges VERY regularly (she suggested weekly or more) then it traps dust and does more harm than good. So she has switched to a regular dust mask that she replaces daily. I can't imagine that is true but wondering about peoples thoughts. I replace my cartridges about every 6 months and am never using them for heavy dust scenarios and the filters always look completely new when I replace them. Also looking for tips to improve my carving workstation to minimize dust. Currently I use a dropcloth which is laundered daily, and a pillow, encased in a plastic bag, then a pillowcase which is laundered semi-regularly, and a scrap of towel for the part that is touching the pot (also laundered daily). The dustiest part is when I shake the dust/trimmings from the towel to the drop-cloth. What would you suggest for a less dusty setup? How concerned should I be about silicosis? Is it possible to get lungs checked for damage already done? Anyone have any experience with respiratory issues? Thanks
  3. Hey All! I'm new here and very new to throwing clay (6 months in) but have come to LOVE using colored slip on greenware and doing sgraffito. Now, please excuse my novice questions but I've been looking online for recipes for different colored slips. My pottery mentor told me to avoid buying stains as they are way too overpriced and to make my own colored slips with different chemicals. I found a black slip recipe easily but can't find a purple one or pink or yellow or green...even blue. Are there such recipes? I do love vibrant colors so this may be something that doesn't exist. Please share what you know about coloring slips without stains. Thanks! Kristy
  4. From the album: Favorites

    I love all the varied shapes a good mug comes in. The shape is my current favorite. It works well to separate the textured areas from the geometric sgraffito in the bottom. It has a pulled handle and commercial glazes and was fired to cone 6 electric.
  5. From the album: Favorites

    I don't make many teapots, but I had the idea for this teapot with a hollow wave cut out of the body. It was an experiment, and it's not perfect but I still really like this piece. Wheel thrown and hand built with applied engobe and underglaze, sgraffito and hand painted waves. Fired to ^6 electric.

    © Firenflux

  6. From the album: Favorites

    This is my favorite piece I have made to date. I sold it about a year ago but haven't made another one yet. It's wheel thrown with applied colored engobes. It's hand carved and textured with pulled handles and commercial glazes. Fired to ^6 electric.

    © Firenflux

  7. From the album: Favorites

    This was a new take on a design I've been doing awhile. It may have spurred a new variation on several of my usual pots. I'm excited to see what comes of it. The pattern at the bottom was created with paper resist and sgraffito. After bisque fired, black underglaze was applied and wiped back, then colorful accents added to the wings. It's finished with commercial ial glazes and fired to cone 6 in an electric kiln.
  8. From the album: Favorites

    Wheel thrown and hand carved. The bottom features a leaf design created by using paper leaves as a resist to the underglaze. Sgraffito designs were added along with a pulled handle and spiral embellishments. Fired to cone 6 in an electric kiln.
  9. From the album: Favorites

    wheel thrown bowl covered in underglaze. I used paper butterfly's to resist the white underglaze and create the butterfly design. I then carved a geometric pattern on the inside and outside of the bowl. It's finished in a commercial clear glaze and fired to cone 6 in an electric kiln.
  10. From the album: Favorites

    Wheel thrown vase with underglaze and sgraffito geometric design. Hand textured and fired in an electric kiln to cone 6.
  11. From the album: Favorites

    Small wheel thrown bowl with underglaze, geometric sgraffito carving, fired to cone 6 in an electric kiln.
  12. From the album: first album

    An example of custom work: Client asked for sisters sitting on a dock feeding ducks. Sorry this picture is so dark
  13. From the album: first album

    another too dark picture. Sorry.
  14. CarolynB

    bee mug

    From the album: first album

    glazed inside and lip, outside is a light wash of an oil spot glaze
  15. From the album: first album

    playing with color pattern and texture, cone 6, Amber celedon, slate blue and black underglaze
  16. From the album: Wheel Thrown Work, 2015

    Mug thrown in Speckled Buff. Design hand-carved and glazed in bright underglaze and overglaze colors. Peach interior and clear glaze on outside.

    © Copyright Giselle Massey - Giselle No. 5 Ceramics - All Rights Reserved

  17. crazypotterlady

    027

    From the album: Displays

    Arrangement of ^6 dark clay functional pottery in an autumn leaf design. Sgraffito through underglazes. Platter, vase, mug, and jar.
  18. From the album: Work in Progress

    Three wheel thrown pieces made with Speckled Buff clay. The interiors are then painted with white stoneware slip and the outside is carved with grass and flowers.

    © Copyright Giselle Massey 2015

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